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Old 03-18-2011, 11:28 AM
 
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Britain and America are two countries separated by a common language.
Couldn't think of two more disparate countries.
I bet that Americans would feel more at home in many European countries than in England. Scandinavia, parts of Germany and southern Europe, almost anywhere but England.

 
Old 03-18-2011, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Fife
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manolón View Post
Britain and America are two countries separated by a common language.
Couldn't think of two more disparate countries.
I bet that Americans would feel more at home in many European countries than in England. Scandinavia, parts of Germany and southern Europe, almost anywhere but England.
yep i would agree with that, because, not being funny, britain has more of an identity than the states because its an older country, and america is a melting pot of a lot of identities
 
Old 03-18-2011, 12:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paull805 View Post
yep i would agree with that, because, not being funny, britain has more of an identity than the states because its an older country, and america is a melting pot of a lot of identities
-----

Well, not really..
It's not about identity and being an older country....
I guess that for an American, England would be a very nice place to visit, but a very uncomfortable place to live.
 
Old 03-18-2011, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Fife
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well it could be identity, maybe you would feel uncomfortable here because you don't get us, our sense of humour etc in other words our identity
 
Old 03-19-2011, 02:08 AM
 
Location: Nowhere Land.
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May I ask at this point, have you all, that are discussing this, been to each other’s countries?

From what I see, there are quite large differences in culture between states in the US, and between countries and counties in the UK.
 
Old 03-19-2011, 05:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LondonUSA View Post
Did i say majority? NO! I said 'largely'. Read every word properly before you state something disagreeing.
large·ly/ˈlärjlē/
Adverb: To a great extent; on the whole; mostly.

Still sounds like majority to me.
You could always just say "Oops. I was wrong." Or "misinformed".
 
Old 03-22-2011, 06:50 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
4,884 posts, read 4,735,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glasvegas View Post
True. Interestingly, the Celts themselves originated from Central Europe. I read somewhere that early British people descended from Basques from the Iberian Peninsula? I'll have to do some more research though.
I believe you are speaking about the Picts which are more associated with Scotland then England. No one really knows anything about the Pictish language so there are dozens of theories out there but they're all just a guess. Yes, one of the theories supposes Picts to be pre-Celtic inhabitants of Britain, most likely a bronze age people, who got driven back by the iron age Celts when they arrived from the European mainland. Again, that's just a guess as there is so little evidence to go on. The Basques are a non-indo-european people and probably the last reminent of the pre-indo-european expansion population left in Europe.
 
Old 03-23-2011, 04:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I have been wondering about this.

What with increasing European integration and all, would people from the UK say they or their country feel closer to the U.S. culturally (because of the language) or closer culturally to the rest of Europe (geographic and political proximity) these days?

Well, of course the UK is closer to the US culturally than any other country in Europe - since the US WAS under British rule for a short period.

However, I don't think the UK associates itself in any cultural similarity with the US per say; the British are really not interested in the US. They have a rich history, an extremely wealthy and dynamic country that -although small - is one of the leading nations of the world that everyone else tries to emulate.
 
Old 03-23-2011, 04:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paull805 View Post
yep i would agree with that, because, not being funny, britain has more of an identity than the states because its an older country, and america is a melting pot of a lot of identities

Nonsense! Most Americans who have lived in the UK love their time here.

And Britain is actually a bigger melting pot than America (gasp! Yes, but its true!). In Britain you quickly sense how deeply proud immigrants are if they are considered British. They quickly want to adapt British mannerism, the culture, the appearance (they dress well in Britain) and so on. The evidence of true value is when there is something worthy to admire or envy.
 
Old 03-24-2011, 03:53 PM
 
356 posts, read 434,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paull805 View Post
also this is incorrect because most of the irish imigrants to america were mostly scottish and nothern english imigrants to ireland, thus they are really descendants from scotland and northern england

wikipedia= ''The origins of the Scotch-Irish lie primarily in the Lowlands of Scotland and in northern England, particularly in the Border Country on either side of the Anglo-Scottish border, a region that had seen centuries of conflict. In the near constant state of war between England and Scotland during the Middle Ages, the livelihood of the people on the borders was devastated by the contending armies. Even when the countries were not at war, tension remained high, and royal authority in one or the other kingdom was often weak. The uncertainty of existence led the people of the borders to seek security through a system of family ties, similar to the clan system in the Scottish Highlands. Known as the Border Reivers, these families relied on their own strength and cunning to survive, and a culture of cattle raiding and thievery developed''

and because these people could not settle in ulster (northern ireland) they set off for america, there is a good documentary on this subject called ''Born Fighting – how Scots and Irish shaped the New World'' should be easily found online, if you would like to watch it pretty much explains it all, its presented by the american senator jim webb, who is of scots-irish heritage
actually that's not true. Most Irish in the US are Catholic and thus likely Irish by heritage, and not Scots-Irish.

Irish American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In fact, those who were descended of the Protestant Scots-Irish identify themselves as such.

As to the % English descent in the US, more people probably have English ancestry than realize it. Most English ancestors were here early as opposed to the more recent German and Irish waves of immigration. Then again, who qualifies as having "English ancestry"? I'm 1/128 English, and without genealogy my family wouldn't have known we were any English. And I don't really consider myself English. You put the ancestry on the census form you're most familiar with, that's it.


Back to the thread at hand, I find this interesting. As an American, I agree with the one person who said, "Most Americans think of the British as just like us with funny accents." I really think that's true in many cases. (Except we tend to stereotype them as weak, also).

I'd say the US is closer culturally to Canada, then Australia. Australians in their outback are pretty much like rural-Americans.

But really, other than Canada (and Mexico to the southern-US) we're pretty isolated over here. I don't consider us culturally like Europe or Great Britain, really. Maybe certain parts of the country are, but we're so huge, it's hard to take one paintbrush and swipe it across.
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