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Old 09-19-2011, 01:00 PM
 
Location: London, United Kingdom
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For me, 'crowded' is the wrong word. I'd call it "tight-knit".

I say that because although yes, it is technically crowded, everyone pulls together and helps each other out (for the most part, anyway!).

 
Old 09-19-2011, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,164 posts, read 21,609,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
I started to get very anxious being in London last January. The crowdedness got to me like New York never could. Outside of London in Berkshire, I'd say it was nice and spaced out enough for me to tolerate. I'm from a very densely populated area originally (San Juan, PR) and London was just too much for me
I find that surprising since New York has a larger population than London in a much smaller area.
 
Old 09-20-2011, 02:55 AM
 
Location: London, United Kingdom
5 posts, read 8,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
I started to get very anxious being in London last January. The crowdedness got to me like New York never could. Outside of London in Berkshire, I'd say it was nice and spaced out enough for me to tolerate. I'm from a very densely populated area originally (San Juan, PR) and London was just too much for me
I also find it surprising, since New York is also covered in skyscrapers, coupled with the amount of people I'd've thought it would be much more claustrophobic.
 
Old 09-20-2011, 05:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I find that surprising since New York has a larger population than London in a much smaller area.
Having lived in both the New York area (White Plains) and London, I don't see too much difference between them in terms of being crowded. Parts of both cities are very urban and have a very high density of people. But both cities have a decent amount of green space and both cities are very easy to get out of. When I lived in London, we would head south into Surrey or Sussex and very quickly you were in countryside with few people around. In New York, we would often head north into the beautiful countryside of Dutchess county. Both trips would take less than an hour.
 
Old 09-20-2011, 10:16 AM
 
25,063 posts, read 21,403,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forkie View Post
I also find it surprising, since New York is also covered in skyscrapers, coupled with the amount of people I'd've thought it would be much more claustrophobic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I find that surprising since New York has a larger population than London in a much smaller area.
To answer both of your questions, even my gf who is from Berkshire said the same thing. From my personal experience, London's streets are way too small, and since it has many buildings, the narrower streets make it seem like the buildings are squashing you. Whereas in New York, in Manhattan anyway, the streets are wider and there's less "clutter" on the sidewalks and it just lends to the perception that is has more open space. Gf said the same thing, and she's English through and through, London seems more crowded than New York according to her as well for the same reasons. New York has a sense of order to its chaos, whereas London is a hodgepodge of little, twisty narrow streets and there seems to be no sense of order.
 
Old 09-20-2011, 12:24 PM
 
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I live near Letchworth, about 40 miles north of London, and yes it feels crowded. Sure there are fields and open space, but the roads, shopping centres, business parks, everywhere all feel crowded and under provided. Ive been to Germany and the US for longer periods of time, ie not just a holiday. Neither felt like they were operating beyond capacity like the UK. Everything is a bloody queue in this stupid country.

Im sure most of that is bad planning in the UK.

Luckily I only work part time at the moment, so can be flexible with things like shopping when its less busy (though still too busy for my liking). If i had to do everything on a saturday i think I would go mad.
 
Old 09-20-2011, 01:34 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
19,690 posts, read 17,778,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prairiestate View Post
Pretty straightforward question. You live on a small island with a lot of people. Does it feel crowded there?
It depends on what you are used to. If you come from a US suburb where people hide away from the rest of the world, you will find Britain crowded, except for the countryside maybe, parts of which are surprisingly empty. I remember going by train from Newcastle southwards, I only remember endless green and lots of sheep

But at the end of the day, people is all that matters in life. And in Britain cities are often so gloomy that people really are the only interesting aspect of them So enjoy the proximity of people
 
Old 09-20-2011, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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British cities aren't gloomy at all!
 
Old 09-20-2011, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,164 posts, read 21,609,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LondonAreaWeatherSummary View Post
I live near Letchworth, about 40 miles north of London, and yes it feels crowded. Sure there are fields and open space, but the roads, shopping centres, business parks, everywhere all feel crowded and under provided. Ive been to Germany and the US for longer periods of time, ie not just a holiday. Neither felt like they were operating beyond capacity like the UK. Everything is a bloody queue in this stupid country.

Im sure most of that is bad planning in the UK.

Luckily I only work part time at the moment, so can be flexible with things like shopping when its less busy (though still too busy for my liking). If i had to do everything on a saturday i think I would go mad.
Depends on where abouts on the country you go.

I have to say I don't encounter queue's very often in Leeds.

I also fail to see how the UK is operating 'beyond capacity'. People queuing for miles has nothing to do with shopping centres/business parks being under provided. That makes little sense if any. There's nothing you can do to get rid of queue's, that's what British people do, it's part of our culture.

I also do all my shopping on a Saturday at Sainsbury's and it's never too crowded at all. The city centre is always full of people on a Saturday afternoon but nothing that would make you feel claustrophobic to the point that you just can't bare it.

Oh and then you have to consider Germany and the US are considerably less over-crowded than the UK. In fact the US isn't over crowded at all since half of its territory is uninhabited. But even then I'd argue that the United States is operating over capacity due to its incredibly large population putting a strain on how well its government can actually provide a first-world standard of living to all 300,000,000+ people.
 
Old 09-20-2011, 08:07 PM
 
25,063 posts, read 21,403,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Depends on where abouts on the country you go.

I have to say I don't encounter queue's very often in Leeds.

I also fail to see how the UK is operating 'beyond capacity'. People queuing for miles has nothing to do with shopping centres/business parks being under provided. That makes little sense if any. There's nothing you can do to get rid of queue's, that's what British people do, it's part of our culture.

I also do all my shopping on a Saturday at Sainsbury's and it's never too crowded at all. The city centre is always full of people on a Saturday afternoon but nothing that would make you feel claustrophobic to the point that you just can't bare it.

Oh and then you have to consider Germany and the US are considerably less over-crowded than the UK. In fact the US isn't over crowded at all since half of its territory is uninhabited. But even then I'd argue that the United States is operating over capacity due to its incredibly large population putting a strain on how well its government can actually provide a first-world standard of living to all 300,000,000+ people.
I didn't encounter many "queues" in Windsor or Slough either. It's only London, so far, that seemed super crowded to me. Even then, most of the crowdedness was along Oxford St. and around the Houses of Parliament and Buckingham Palace. I much enjoyed my time in Windsor instead, and the family wedding I went to in rural west Oxfordshire. That was pretty fun, I was the only foreigner there and, much to my surprise, I was the first American most of them met. I loved the west country and the villages (except the questionable group of hooded kids hanging around the local Co-Op in Carterton)
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