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Old 09-20-2011, 08:09 PM
 
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In fact the UK is not crowded. The south east of England is crowded. The rest of the country is not.

 
Old 09-20-2011, 09:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaggy001 View Post
In fact the UK is not crowded. The south east of England is crowded. The rest of the country is not.
England is most crowded country in Europe - Telegraph

Yes, I realize they are talking about England, which does not make up the entirety of the UK, let alone the island of Britain. Still...
 
Old 09-20-2011, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Because London and the South East of England make up the largest percentage of England's population.

Go to North East England or the West Midlands, home to counties that have very little urbanity.

And besides, comparing England to Germany, for example, is like comparing Wyoming to Canada.
 
Old 09-21-2011, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Scotland
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West Midlands, Greater Manchester and Strathclyde (Greater Glasgow) are also fairly crowded.
 
Old 09-21-2011, 06:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paull805 View Post
West Midlands, Greater Manchester and Strathclyde (Greater Glasgow) are also fairly crowded.
The cities are crowded

I picked up an interesting statistic about England and Wales ....

"All except around 400,000 of us live on just 2.2m acres - about 6% of the total land area"

Land care and Permaculture (http://www.self-willed-land.org.uk/articles/land_care_perm.htm - broken link)
 
Old 09-21-2011, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Scotland
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There the most crowded areas outside London. It's not Just the cities of Birmingham, Manchester and Glasgow, it's also the surrounding areas. In the West Midlands there is Birmingham, Wolverhampton, Coventry, Dudley, Sandwell, Solihull, and Walsall with nearly with 2.7million people staying there. In Greater Manchester there's Manchester, Salford, Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan with 2.6million people staying there. In Greater Glasgow there's Glasgow, Airdrie, Bearsden, Bellshill, Bishopbriggs, Cambuslang, Clydebank, Coatbridge, Motherwell and Paisley with 1.2million people staying there.

Last edited by paull805; 09-21-2011 at 07:28 AM..
 
Old 09-23-2011, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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How are cities such as Leicester, Bristol, Northampton, Nottingham, and Middlesbrough, etc. in that regard?
 
Old 09-23-2011, 02:13 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
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I was in London for nine months. I really didn't notice it feeling crowded coming from San Francisco (second most densely populated city in the US) but after I got home San Francisco felt positively calm and quiet by comparison. I think its just the overall closeness of how people live in England. Even outside of London there is a new village or town every mile or two. In more rural parts of California settlements are spaced apart at least ten times that distance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
British cities aren't gloomy at all!
Well... As much as I enjoy England, the cities did seem a little dark and a bit grimy at times (the stone and brickwork). Plus the winter days are so gray and short compared to parts farther south. I remember flying home for Christmas after being in London for four months and San Francisco seem very bright and white to me (sun was shining and it was about 60F that December day). Mostly wood buildings and stucco painted light colors.
 
Old 09-23-2011, 02:31 PM
 
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I grew up in NYC all my life. When I moved to England and had to travel back and forth to London, I always left London with a migraine. It is way too crowded for me, at times I felt claustrophobic. We went on holiday to Hong Kong and I felt relief. If I wanted to go shopping in a big city, I prefer going to the Bull Ring in Birmingham before going into London. If I move back I would most likely look at a town like Leamington Spa just to have the feeling of some space or a small town on the outskirts of London along the M25.
 
Old 09-23-2011, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paull805 View Post
West Midlands, Greater Manchester and Strathclyde (Greater Glasgow) are also fairly crowded.
I know. But away from the major cities, the northern and midland areas are not very crowded. Counties like Herefordshire, Shropshire, Northumberland and Cumbria have very low density.
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