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Old 09-23-2011, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
14,829 posts, read 8,597,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOriginalMrsX View Post
I grew up in NYC all my life. When I moved to England and had to travel back and forth to London, I always left London with a migraine. It is way too crowded for me, at times I felt claustrophobic. We went on holiday to Hong Kong and I felt relief. If I wanted to go shopping in a big city, I prefer going to the Bull Ring in Birmingham before going into London. If I move back I would most likely look at a town like Leamington Spa just to have the feeling of some space or a small town on the outskirts of London along the M25.
When you live here all your life it isn't a problem at all really. And as I said before I find it surprising that people find London more crowded than NYC when they share a relatively same population but London is much more spread out and larger in area and actually has 'suburbs' that aren't all high density housing.

And I love the hectic buzz of a city centre, which is probably why I'm in a hurry to go to London, can't stand the suburbs!

 
Old 09-23-2011, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffredo View Post
I was in London for nine months. I really didn't notice it feeling crowded coming from San Francisco (second most densely populated city in the US) but after I got home San Francisco felt positively calm and quiet by comparison. I think its just the overall closeness of how people live in England. Even outside of London there is a new village or town every mile or two. In more rural parts of California settlements are spaced apart at least ten times that distance.



Well... As much as I enjoy England, the cities did seem a little dark and a bit grimy at times (the stone and brickwork). Plus the winter days are so gray and short compared to parts farther south. I remember flying home for Christmas after being in London for four months and San Francisco seem very bright and white to me (sun was shining and it was about 60F that December day). Mostly wood buildings and stucco painted light colors.
Hm, fair enough. Though I always find British cities more attractive than American ones, in terms of historical architecture at least.
 
Old 09-24-2011, 08:22 AM
 
1,933 posts, read 1,822,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
When you live here all your life it isn't a problem at all really. And as I said before I find it surprising that people find London more crowded than NYC when they share a relatively same population but London is much more spread out and larger in area and actually has 'suburbs' that aren't all high density housing.

And I love the hectic buzz of a city centre, which is probably why I'm in a hurry to go to London, can't stand the suburbs!
I find it more crowded is smaller streets and the buildings are much smaller so it gives in that closed in feel. The only time I did not feel so closed in was down by the Gherkin.

My husband has lived in England all his life and he too finds London to be to crowded. He rather take NYC or any other UK city over London any day of the week. But if we had to move back and London was the only option, I would take London over living in the US.
 
Old 09-24-2011, 09:55 AM
 
Location: locus amoenus
1,777 posts, read 1,875,099 times
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I lived in London years ago and while some places and main streets got very crowded, particularly on work days, I thought that there were many quiet areas where you could just chill out and that felt like a much smaller town. London is huge and I found that to be a blessing.

The UK on the whole didn't, doesn't feel crowded to me. European urban nuclei are very dense and the UK is no exception, but there's plenty of countryside, and rural and small town living, too. I dón't think the insularity makes it more claustrophobic or anything.
 
Old 09-24-2011, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOriginalMrsX View Post
I find it more crowded is smaller streets and the buildings are much smaller so it gives in that closed in feel. The only time I did not feel so closed in was down by the Gherkin.

My husband has lived in England all his life and he too finds London to be to crowded. He rather take NYC or any other UK city over London any day of the week. But if we had to move back and London was the only option, I would take London over living in the US.
Oh yeah, the small streets. After the Great Fire of London city planners in London decided to keep the old medieval street layout rather than going for a grid-system (which is actually a British invention, in Glasgow!) for some reason, which is probably why London feels very crowded a lot, especially compared to other British cities.
 
Old 09-25-2011, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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[quote=dunno what to put here;20964098]Depends on where abouts on the country you go.

I have to say I don't encounter queue's very often in Leeds.

I also fail to see how the UK is operating 'beyond capacity'. People queuing for miles has nothing to do with shopping centres/business parks being under provided. That makes little sense if any. There's nothing you can do to get rid of queue's, that's what British people do, it's part of our culture.

I also do all my shopping on a Saturday at Sainsbury's and it's never too crowded at all. The city centre is always full of people on a Saturday afternoon but nothing that would make you feel claustrophobic to the point that you just can't bare it.

Oh and then you have to consider Germany and the US are considerably less over-crowded than the UK. In fact the US isn't over crowded at all since half of its territory is uninhabited. But even then I'd argue that the United States is operating over capacity due to its incredibly large population putting a strain on how well its government can actually provide a first-world standard of living to all 300,000,000+ people.[/quote]

Interesting that you say that. Growing up I never heard talk of breaking the US up into a more regionally based group of countries, more like the EU. I have to say I've heard more and more talk of that lately as the US seems to have become a giant, unwieldy nation that can't get anything done. Particularly when it comes to infrastructure. Maybe we should break up into six smaller nations.
 
Old 09-25-2011, 01:29 PM
 
2,087 posts, read 3,631,144 times
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[quote=tom77falcons;21026317]
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Depends on where abouts on the country you go.

I have to say I don't encounter queue's very often in Leeds.

I also fail to see how the UK is operating 'beyond capacity'. People queuing for miles has nothing to do with shopping centres/business parks being under provided. That makes little sense if any. There's nothing you can do to get rid of queue's, that's what British people do, it's part of our culture.

I also do all my shopping on a Saturday at Sainsbury's and it's never too crowded at all. The city centre is always full of people on a Saturday afternoon but nothing that would make you feel claustrophobic to the point that you just can't bare it.

Oh and then you have to consider Germany and the US are considerably less over-crowded than the UK. In fact the US isn't over crowded at all since half of its territory is uninhabited. But even then I'd argue that the United States is operating over capacity due to its incredibly large population putting a strain on how well its government can actually provide a first-world standard of living to all 300,000,000+ people.[/quote]

Interesting that you say that. Growing up I never heard talk of breaking the US up into a more regionally based group of countries, more like the EU. I have to say I've heard more and more talk of that lately as the US seems to have become a giant, unwieldy nation that can't get anything done. Particularly when it comes to infrastructure. Maybe we should break up into six smaller nations.
Actually the U.S. is already divided into 50 states, which have a fair amount of autonomy. As the nation expanded, the territory continued to be divided into states in part because it would have been too unwieldy to run such a large country entirely from a national level.
 
Old 09-25-2011, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
5,867 posts, read 2,916,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaggy001 View Post
The cities are crowded

I picked up an interesting statistic about England and Wales ....

"All except around 400,000 of us live on just 2.2m acres - about 6% of the total land area"

Land care and Permaculture (http://www.self-willed-land.org.uk/articles/land_care_perm.htm - broken link)
Very good point. In the US, 75% of the population lives in 2.5% of the land area. When I took a train from London to Manchester a few years back, the countryside was beautiful on a sunny day in May. I saw green hills spreading out in the distance for miles. Didn't look crowded at all to me once outside the major cities.
 
Old 09-26-2011, 12:04 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,693 posts, read 18,980,446 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaggy001 View Post
In fact the UK is not crowded. The south east of England is crowded. The rest of the country is not.
That's an erroneous statement. All of England is crowded with small pockets of 'rural' land and a few tiny national parks which would qualify as suburbs and a few large city parks in the US. From Sheffield north to Leeds and Manchester to Liverpool is super-dense. The UK is one of the densest countries in the world by population (the population of France in 1/4 the area) with a population density comparable to nations like Japan. And if you consider England, with half the land and by far the majority of the population, the density figures go up even more. Don't be fooled by the quaint, countryside of the UK, this is one crowded island.
 
Old 09-26-2011, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
14,829 posts, read 8,597,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
That's an erroneous statement. All of England is crowded with small pockets of 'rural' land and a few tiny national parks which would qualify as suburbs and a few large city parks in the US. From Sheffield north to Leeds and Manchester to Liverpool is super-dense. The UK is one of the densest countries in the world by population (the population of France in 1/4 the area) with a population density comparable to nations like Japan. And if you consider England, with half the land and by far the majority of the population, the density figures go up even more. Don't be fooled by the quaint, countryside of the UK, this is one crowded island.
Some true statements there, but there's plenty of open countryside in the UK. I live in the UK's fourth largest urban area, but there's rolling hills and woodland right on my doorstep which goes on for miles and miles. The Yorkshire Dales, The Lake District, The Peak District and Northumbria would hardly qualify as city parks in the US.. unless you think the Pennines of northern England would easily fit in the centre of New York.

But yes, we are very over-crowded, but if you want to scape the urbanity that is the majority of England, I, for example, could be on a train and in 20 minutes be in TWO national parks with miles on end of untouched beauty... that's the great thing about the UK in my pinon, you are never far away from a town or city but never far away from some breathtaking countryside
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