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Old 09-26-2011, 02:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Some true statements there, but there's plenty of open countryside in the UK. I live in the UK's fourth largest urban area, but there's rolling hills and woodland right on my doorstep which goes on for miles and miles. The Yorkshire Dales, The Lake District, The Peak District and Northumbria would hardly qualify as city parks in the US.. unless you think the Pennines of northern England would easily fit in the centre of New York.

But yes, we are very over-crowded, but if you want to scape the urbanity that is the majority of England, I, for example, could be on a train and in 20 minutes be in TWO national parks with miles on end of untouched beauty... that's the great thing about the UK in my pinon, you are never far away from a town or city but never far away from some breathtaking countryside
Right - and the OP's question was does it FEEL crowded. Answer (from most people who actually live here) is that no, it does NOT feel crowded, except in the cities and towns. As you have said, the rural land and green space are expansive, not "small pockets".

This was one of the biggest surprises to me when I first visited here - from the statistics and people per square kilometre data I expected no green space and wall to wall people. You get the wall to wall people in the cities, but the farm land and green rolling hills stretch for miles and miles and miles

 
Old 09-26-2011, 04:24 AM
 
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I grew up in Glasgow which is the centre of a large Metropolitan area of approximately 1.5 million people. But, in 30-60 minutes you are out in the middle of nowhere whether it be the Campsies, Loch Lomond or the beaches of Ayrshire.
 
Old 09-26-2011, 05:15 AM
 
Location: Scotland
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I think England must be super crowded, 52million people in an area roughly a similar size to Scotland, California etc. Yeah most people can travel to green space fairly quickly but I can't name many countries with so many people in such a small area.
 
Old 09-26-2011, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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It is crowded, but the question is, does it feel crowded. The answer is no.

And you cannot compare England to sovereign states, since it is not one. You can, however, compare England to North-Rhine-Westphalia in Germany, which has a density of 1,356 people per square mile.
 
Old 09-26-2011, 05:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paull805 View Post
I think England must be super crowded, 52million people in an area roughly a similar size to Scotland, California etc. Yeah most people can travel to green space fairly quickly but I can't name many countries with so many people in such a small area.
Not really. They are all crowded into a few metropolitan areas leaving a good amount of empty space in between. Thus, the Peak district between Manchester and Leeds/Sheffield is very accessible and pretty empty. from Liverpool it is not so far to North Wales, Birmingham is close to 'leafy' Warwickshire and from London it is not so far to the beautiful countryside of Sussex.

So the point is that the cities are crowded (like cities everywhere) but the country is not.
 
Old 09-26-2011, 06:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
It is crowded, but the question is, does it feel crowded. The answer is no.

And you cannot compare England to sovereign states, since it is not one. You can, however, compare England to North-Rhine-Westphalia in Germany, which has a density of 1,356 people per square mile.
Right. Or you could look at density maps that show how cities like Dundee, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, London ARE crowded, but that there are many areas in the COUNTRY itself, which are not.

http://www.city-data.com/forum/membe...uk-density.jpg
 
Old 09-26-2011, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunshineleith View Post
Right. Or you could look at density maps that show how cities like Dundee, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, London ARE crowded, but that there are many areas in the COUNTRY itself, which are not.

http://www.city-data.com/forum/membe...uk-density.jpg
Shows that away from the urban areas England isn't that crowded in reality. Afterall, the five largest counties by population make up 31.9% of England's population.
 
Old 09-26-2011, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paull805 View Post
I think England must be super crowded, 52million people in an area roughly a similar size to Scotland, California etc. Yeah most people can travel to green space fairly quickly but I can't name many countries with so many people in such a small area.

Actually, England is much smaller than California. Louisiana comes closest at around 51,000 sq mi, while England is around 50,000 sq mi. Many states are around the same size as England. My state has 46,000 sq miiles and is ranked 33rd in total area. Californis is larger than the entire UK (164,000 sq mi vs. 95,000 sq mi).

Having said that, I believe the overwhelming consensus is that England does not feel crowded. And that is coming from people that actually live there. I think they do smart planning and urban development. Wish someone could teach that to the sprawlers we have over here.
 
Old 09-26-2011, 08:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunshineleith View Post
Right - and the OP's question was does it FEEL crowded. Answer (from most people who actually live here) is that no, it does NOT feel crowded, except in the cities and towns. As you have said, the rural land and green space are expansive, not "small pockets".

This was one of the biggest surprises to me when I first visited here - from the statistics and people per square kilometre data I expected no green space and wall to wall people. You get the wall to wall people in the cities, but the farm land and green rolling hills stretch for miles and miles and miles
This is very accurate! I was surprised when I took the train out of London towards Northampton and saw sheep. I asked my husband at the time is that cotton fields (very American of me)..he said No. It is sheep grazing.

One thing I do love about England is that once you do remove yourself from the city literally anywhere between 20 minutes to an hour you can be in lush green country side. I love the spring when the yellow rapeseed comes to bloom and fills the fields.

Yes cities and towns 'feel' crowded but the UK overall does not. My Fil lives in a village where the nearest hospital is over 40 minutes away and they still only have dial up!
 
Old 09-26-2011, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by docwatson View Post
Comparisons to California are a bit unfair anyway because California is mostly desert, irrigated desert, and mountains ... with the people crowded along the coast in cities that (save San Francisco) were built for the automobile, hence lots of land area in asphalt for roads, highways and parking lots. The UK is mostly habitable, green land. I lived in Japan and the comparison to California was often made (as land area actually was similar), but I'd take Japan (all things being equal) for its mountains, miles and miles of seacoast, many islands, more compact cities with good public transit, and probably more affordable housing.
Good point - certainly England more so than the rest of the UK is 90-95% habitable, fertile land if not even more, and so naturally we can sustain a denser population than somewhere where half the land is desert/mountains/permafrost etc without people feeling crowded in the places where they live.
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