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Old 12-08-2011, 02:12 AM
 
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I am a US born citizen wanting to retire in the UK. Is that a complete dream or is there a touch of reality in my quest? I will have some savings and social security. A part time job would be great if I'm allowed. I have just started looking into a long term visa, but nothing seemed to fit my situation. Does anybody have experience in this?
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Old 12-08-2011, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Airstrip 1, Oceania
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There are only three ways to do this: 1. marry a British citizen and get a spouse visa. 2. If you are a multi-millionaire you can get an investor's visa. 3. Investigate your ancestry and try to obtain citizenship of one of the 27 member countries of the European Union - this will give you the right to live in any of them including the UK. The rules are different for each country - some will only give citizenship if you have a native-born parent, some will give it via a grandparent, some will go back even further.
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Old 12-08-2011, 05:57 PM
 
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May I join this discussion? I am similarly interested in retirement in the UK. I saw the following information on a UK web site:

Persons aged 60 years or more may retire to the United Kingdom if they intend to have their principal home in the country.
The applicant should have a net income after overseas and United Kingdom taxes of at least GBP25,000 per annum. It is also a requirement that the applicant shows a close connection with the country, perhaps by long employment in the country or close relatives living here already.
If you have a specific question regarding retirement in the United Kingdom, please email personal@visalondon.com or use our general enquiry form.

Retiring in the United Kingdom UK as a person of independent means

This seems to put forth a slightly different standard in that it does not seem to require any change of citizenship. Can anyone elaborate on this or reconcile post #2 with this? Does the difference relate to teh OP's interest in employment?

Thanks
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Old 12-08-2011, 06:34 PM
 
Location: American Expat
2,129 posts, read 2,392,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeTheFencer View Post
I am a US born citizen wanting to retire in the UK. Is that a complete dream or is there a touch of reality in my quest? I will have some savings and social security. A part time job would be great if I'm allowed. I have just started looking into a long term visa, but nothing seemed to fit my situation. Does anybody have experience in this?
As they pointed out below - going to the website of the British Embassy in the U.S. would probably be a good start.

FAQs

Or the other website I posted below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
May I join this discussion? I am similarly interested in retirement in the UK. I saw the following information on a UK web site:

Persons aged 60 years or more may retire to the United Kingdom if they intend to have their principal home in the country.
The applicant should have a net income after overseas and United Kingdom taxes of at least GBP25,000 per annum. It is also a requirement that the applicant shows a close connection with the country, perhaps by long employment in the country or close relatives living here already.
If you have a specific question regarding retirement in the United Kingdom, please email personal@visalondon.com or use our general enquiry form.

Retiring in the United Kingdom UK as a person of independent means

This seems to put forth a slightly different standard in that it does not seem to require any change of citizenship. Can anyone elaborate on this or reconcile post #2 with this? Does the difference relate to teh OP's interest in employment?

Thanks
What do you mean by "change of citizenship" ? You can't just "change" your citizenship.
That website is not an official one.

UK Border Agency | Extending your stay as a retired person of independent means

Looks like the U.K. closed this visa category in 2007. Perhaps they have something else now, because this was somewhat hidden. I can't find anythign else, though.
Just the regular work visa section, but that seems to be out of question anyway.

UK Border Agency | Working in the UK

They also don't seem to extend most visitor visas for more than 6 months.

UK Border Agency | If your visa has expired or will expire soon

It's tough. I believe marrying any E.U. citizen would be ok because you would get some special rights even as non-E.U. citizen. Ok, I'm sure you wouldn't wanna do that anyway, but I figured I'd just throw this in the mix.
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Old 12-08-2011, 06:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-666 View Post
. . . . 3. Investigate your ancestry and try to obtain citizenship of one of the 27 member countries of the European Union - this will give you the right to live in any of them including the UK. The rules are different for each country - some will only give citizenship if you have a native-born parent, some will give it via a grandparent, some will go back even further.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
. . . .

What do you mean by "change of citizenship" ? You can't just "change" your citizenship.
Of course one can change citizenship. Even so, it wasn't my comment in the first place. It was the response above that stated it.

Thank you for the links. That would be my interest, i.e. extended stay in the UK. Actually, I can continue to work by virtual office in the US which is probably what I will do for a few years at least. I assume that accessing my office in the US via the Internet would not violate anything in the UK.
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Old 12-08-2011, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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You mean they have immigration laws? Wow...must be nice.
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Old 12-08-2011, 07:16 PM
 
Location: American Expat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Of course one can change citizenship. Even so, it wasn't my comment in the first place. It was the response above that stated it.

Thank you for the links. That would be my interest, i.e. extended stay in the UK. Actually, I can continue to work by virtual office in the US which is probably what I will do for a few years at least. I assume that accessing my office in the US via the Internet would not violate anything in the UK.
As I said, you can not just change your citizenship. Nobody's gonna give you a passport just like this. The extended stay is only for 6 months. And it says they usually do not extend it beyond those 6 months. They also only do grandparents, not great grandparents etc. Interestingly, you would only get a permanent visa, it seems. Not even citizenship.
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Old 12-08-2011, 07:23 PM
 
8,704 posts, read 12,557,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
As I said, you can not just change your citizenship. Nobody's gonna give you a passport just like this. The extended stay is only for 6 months. And it says they usually do not extend it beyond those 6 months. They also only do grandparents, not great grandparents etc. Interestingly, you would only get a permanent visa, it seems. Not even citizenship.

I take it from the link that the five year extended stay for retired persons of independent means was repealed in 2008.
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Old 12-08-2011, 09:08 PM
 
Location: American Expat
2,129 posts, read 2,392,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
I take it from the link that the five year extended stay for retired persons of independent means was repealed in 2008.
Yeah, that visa no longer exists. I guess it's time to get used to the British accent and go on a British bride hunt.
Might want to check out other European countries, too.
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Old 12-08-2011, 09:33 PM
 
8,704 posts, read 12,557,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
Yeah, that visa no longer exists. I guess it's time to get used to the British accent and go on a British bride hunt.
Might want to check out other European countries, too.

I don't think my wife would appreciate that.

I am not interested in anything but the UK. I've been to several European countries and only UK stuck me as a place I would like to spend more time. I like everything British. My ancestors were from Exeter. I particularly liked Oxford, but I am also interested in the coastal area around Plymouth. I guess I'll have to settle for an extended vacation or two.
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