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Old 03-24-2012, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Fife
6,585 posts, read 4,586,071 times
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Get out of town! You will never be able to change Scottish dialects, it is to much rooted in our regions, it is called identity it works fine for us.
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Old 03-24-2012, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,411 posts, read 9,214,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paull805 View Post
Get out of town! You will never be able to change Scottish dialects, it is to much rooted in our regions, it is called identity it works fine for us.
I think it adds to the charm, but it may be getting out of hand when/if people cannot understand what you are saying on tv and telephones. It impedes commerce, limits children from broadening their education sometimes. It could turn into a BIG problem. Best addressing it early.
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Old 03-24-2012, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Fife
6,585 posts, read 4,586,071 times
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Or not, and stay the way we are - Scottish, with our language the way it has been for a very, very long time.
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Old 03-25-2012, 01:49 PM
 
Location: NJ
2,199 posts, read 4,205,801 times
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I don't define either as "more" scottish than the other. Gaelic is primarily spoken in the far north and islands and has no direct relation to English. I can't understand a word, either written or spoken more's the pity.

"Broad Scots" is something harder to define. I can almost always identify which area of Scotland someone is from by the accent and words. Glaswegian is very distinct, most notably by the gluttoral stop and disappearance of most consonants - "b'le' for 'bottle' or "ta'y" for "potatoe". East coast is more rounded with very particular vowel sounds.
Then there's Doric which I would center on Aberdeen/Grampian/Buchan. This uses distinct words unrelated to English - "Cheil" for guy, "quine" for young girl, "loon" for young man, and words recognized in English but utilized differently - "fine" for good. "He's an affa fine cheil" would mean "he's a really good guy. Right will be pronounced "richt", "what" is pronounced "fit" - "how are you?" becomes "Fit like?".
Doric Scots can be incomprehensible to anyone outside of the area and indeed there are unique speech patterns among towns. The only reason I can follow is because my family originally comes from there and I spent the summers there. My relatives all have to switch to "proper English" to be understood and then they still make mistakes.
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Old 03-26-2012, 09:45 AM
 
203 posts, read 237,205 times
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I read somewhere that Scotland has four official languages:

English
English spoken with a Scottish accent with a differentiated grammar
Saxon, the Court's language until annexation
Gaelic
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Old 03-26-2012, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
14,609 posts, read 8,183,530 times
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Scots Gaelic is Celtic

Broad Scots is Germanic

Broad Scots is far more common, according to Wiki between 17% and 85% of the Scottish population speak it to some degree.
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Old 03-28-2012, 03:38 AM
 
Location: The cupboard under the sink
3,574 posts, read 3,924,256 times
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Quite a lot of Scots is very Scandinavian, possibly due to Viking influence, or possibly just trading links.

Some similarities between
English......... Doric.............. Norwegian
church......... kirk................. kirke
good............ braw(if in Dundee said as "bra")................ bra
child............. bairn............... barn
poo............... dirt................. dritt
house........... hoose.............. hus (pr hoose)
go................ gang............... gang
mouse.......... moose............. mus (pr moose)
from............ fae................... fra
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Old 04-03-2012, 02:03 AM
 
Location: Paris, France
320 posts, read 403,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyB View Post
I don't define either as "more" scottish than the other. Gaelic is primarily spoken in the far north and islands and has no direct relation to English. I can't understand a word, either written or spoken more's the pity.
Actually, Anthony, Gaelic is not spoken really at all in the far north of Scotland (Caithness, Orkney Islands, etc).

Its stronghold is the Outer Hebrides islands (or Na h-Eileanan Siar in Gaelic), where it is still spoken as a mother tongue by between 50-75% of the population.

It is also spoken to a lesser extent on the Isle of Skye and some of the other smaller Inner Hebrides, by between 30-60% of the population depending on the locality.

Caithness - in the far north - has next to no native Gaelic speakers, and the remote northwest coast still reports less than 10%.

Check out the map here:
Scottish Gaelic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 04-10-2012, 03:18 AM
 
3,062 posts, read 4,062,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by britinparis View Post
Actually, Anthony, Gaelic is not spoken really at all in the far north of Scotland (Caithness, Orkney Islands, etc).

Its stronghold is the Outer Hebrides islands (or Na h-Eileanan Siar in Gaelic), where it is still spoken as a mother tongue by between 50-75% of the population...

Anthony said the far north and islands. Not the far northern islands.
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