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Old 04-12-2012, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Southern England.
10,645 posts, read 6,631,360 times
Reputation: 18485

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Cheers.
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Old 04-12-2012, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Next stop Antarctica
1,668 posts, read 1,272,143 times
Reputation: 1711
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunshineleith View Post
There are a number of lovely thatched ones near me as well.
This one is a beauty

The Tollemache Arms:: OS grid SP7780 :: Geograph Britain and Ireland - photograph every grid square!





(Just a reminder on this thread re the ToS and copyright - only post photos you have taken yourself - otherwise please post a link to the photo)
Have been to this pub many times, as i lived in a large town nearby, as you say there are many in Northants with the thatched roof, must look up some photo's.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Purgatory
2,667 posts, read 2,451,708 times
Reputation: 2937
Damn, I miss the pubs.

They're not just about getting s**tfaced. They're places to socialise and talk, put the world to rights or watch a game of football on a Sunday afternoon. Country pubs tend to have beer gardens too and you can't beat sitting outside (even when it's cloudy and 16 degrees) with a nice pint and a packet of Walker's crisps or pork scratchings.

Pubs are great places to talk, that's the whole point. Other countries have bars, but they're not the same and they usually have god-awful loud music playing, so loud that you have to shout across the table to your friends to be heard.

I miss the normalcy and sanity of the UK.
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Old 04-13-2012, 01:54 AM
 
Location: England
2,138 posts, read 1,699,883 times
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My local pub is the meeting place for the local golf society, the allotment society, the deep sea angling club and the Rotarians.
And of course the ancient brotherhood of tiplers!
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Old 04-13-2012, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
5,347 posts, read 6,669,256 times
Reputation: 6273
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
The UK doesn't get the same summer we do, but I don't care if it was 70F and cloudy, I'd still very much enjoy sitting there.
That's the problem though... the average highs in the summer are in the 60s. I wouldn't mind 70F and cloudy either... but typically, it's more like 60 and either raining or threatening to rain. Oh, and windy too (example: wind speeds for Manchester average around 8-10mph with gusts averaging around 20+mph - wunderground.com). All of which makes it feel even cooler than it is. And the summer is much shorter too - while much of the US can start enjoying the outdoors as early as March, don't expect that in the UK. It's April and I'm still wearing my winter coat most days.

Of course we DO get nice days. It's not like the sun never comes out or it never breaks 70F. But those days are in a minority and the likelihood one will fall on a day when you have the time to relax outside a nice pub are few and far between.
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Old 04-13-2012, 07:36 AM
 
Location: England
2,138 posts, read 1,699,883 times
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The weather in the South is usually a lot better than the north of England. I live in West Sussex and the temp this morning in my garden, which is south facing, is, according to my weather station, 21.9c or 73f and not a cloud in the sky.
Last summer we had long spells of sunny weather with temperatures in the 80s and very little rain, hence the hosepipe bans that are presently in place.
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Old 04-13-2012, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Colorado
4,268 posts, read 7,409,222 times
Reputation: 4144
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragonborn View Post
Damn, I miss the pubs.

They're not just about getting s**tfaced. They're places to socialise and talk, put the world to rights or watch a game of football on a Sunday afternoon. Country pubs tend to have beer gardens too and you can't beat sitting outside (even when it's cloudy and 16 degrees) with a nice pint and a packet of Walker's crisps or pork scratchings.

Pubs are great places to talk, that's the whole point. Other countries have bars, but they're not the same and they usually have god-awful loud music playing, so loud that you have to shout across the table to your friends to be heard.

I miss the normalcy and sanity of the UK.
And they're not pick-up joints like most American bars tend to be. Well, not usually
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Old 04-13-2012, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
5,347 posts, read 6,669,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by albion View Post
The weather in the South is usually a lot better than the north of England. I live in West Sussex and the temp this morning in my garden, which is south facing, is, according to my weather station, 21.9c or 73f and not a cloud in the sky.
Last summer we had long spells of sunny weather with temperatures in the 80s and very little rain, hence the hosepipe bans that are presently in place.
I will grant you that the south has slightly better weather than the north. But every weather website I check for areas of West Sussex say it's currently no warmer than 56F (also, btw, 21.9c is more like 71F but that's besides the point). In fact, the Met Office is issuing a yellow warning of severe weather (rain) in the south of England! Unless the weather has drastically changed within a couple hours (which is not impossible for England), your weather station has got it horribly wrong, lol!

Severe weather warnings - Met Office

As for the last summer, it was dubbed the coldest summer in the UK in 18 years - for the whole of the country, not just the north. So the sunny, hot spells were not that long.

UK's coldest summer since 1993 - in pictures | UK news | guardian.co.uk

Here's a weather history of London from last June, July and August (not West Sussex but close):
History : Weather Underground
History : Weather Underground
History : Weather Underground

As you can see, more clouds/rain than sun. Average highs were in the 60s. Sure, there were days that broke 70 or even 80 - but on average, they were in the minority and the days in the 60s or even 50s draws the average down.
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Old 04-13-2012, 09:39 AM
 
Location: The Silver State (from the UK)
3,633 posts, read 4,280,064 times
Reputation: 2246
Quote:
Originally Posted by albion View Post
The weather in the South is usually a lot better than the north of England. I live in West Sussex and the temp this morning in my garden, which is south facing, is, according to my weather station, 21.9c or 73f and not a cloud in the sky.
Last summer we had long spells of sunny weather with temperatures in the 80s and very little rain, hence the hosepipe bans that are presently in place.

Last summer? There wasnt one
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Old 04-13-2012, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
14,927 posts, read 8,923,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
That's the problem though... the average highs in the summer are in the 60s. I wouldn't mind 70F and cloudy either... but typically, it's more like 60 and either raining or threatening to rain. Oh, and windy too (example: wind speeds for Manchester average around 8-10mph with gusts averaging around 20+mph - wunderground.com). All of which makes it feel even cooler than it is. And the summer is much shorter too - while much of the US can start enjoying the outdoors as early as March, don't expect that in the UK. It's April and I'm still wearing my winter coat most days.

Of course we DO get nice days. It's not like the sun never comes out or it never breaks 70F. But those days are in a minority and the likelihood one will fall on a day when you have the time to relax outside a nice pub are few and far between.
A large chunk of the US is still shovelling snow into April. In many winters people in Manchester won't even have to shovel snow at all.

Anyway, Manchester is a cool city, it's the kind of place where you don't let the weather stop you from having a good time.
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