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View Poll Results: Im a Brit living in
The UK 29 12.24%
Europe 0 0%
US 37 15.61%
Other 5 2.11%
Im not a Brit 166 70.04%
Voters: 237. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-13-2008, 08:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post

Also, he uses a word/s for snap that I will never remember. A snap that you might have on your clothing -- anyone know?
We used to call those press-stud things on clothing 'poppers'
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Old 02-13-2008, 09:20 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,161 posts, read 2,858,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
We used to call those press-stud things on clothing 'poppers'
Of course 'poppers' means something else entirely these days... I was going to use but then I thought was probably more appropriate to the subject, or is that a bit too 90s? lol
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Old 02-13-2008, 10:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RH1 View Post
Of course 'poppers' means something else entirely these days... I was going to use but then I thought was probably more appropriate to the subject, or is that a bit too 90s? lol
Hence my !!!!!!

Did they have raves in the US?
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Old 02-13-2008, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
11,289 posts, read 12,930,435 times
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I watch a lot of British TV on BBC America and PBS, plus when I lived in Germany I used to travel to England on a regular basis for work, so I can easily understand UK English, but I do wonder how they understand us!

Maybe someone can confirm this, but is the phrase "Went missing", as in, "Last evening two hikers went missing in the mountains..." a British phrase? I was taught in journalism school in the '90s that this was incorrect. Now we hear it daily on the news and it sounds strange.

I also hear "Cheers" used commonly on the phone and used in e-mail instead of good bye.

I love the show "Keeping Up Appearances" and find myself picking up words and phrases like "take away" for "carry out" (the Chinese take away), "postal code" instead of "zip code" and others.
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Old 02-13-2008, 07:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
Maybe someone can confirm this, but is the phrase "Went missing", as in, "Last evening two hikers went missing in the mountains..." a British phrase? I was taught in journalism school in the '90s that this was incorrect. Now we hear it daily on the news and it sounds strange.
"Went missing" is used extensively here in the US on news programs. I do not know where it originated, but it sounds and IS wrong. That one phrase makes me cringe. You also hear people say "gone missing" on news programs. Both phrases are "cringeworthy" (thank you, northsider for that one; I like it very much).
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Old 02-13-2008, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Ireland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irukandji View Post
You also hear people say "gone missing" on news programs. Both phrases are "cringeworthy" (thank you, northsider for that one; I like it very much).
You're welcome.

Let's have another one that's 'cringeworthy' to me. "Bishop slams government cutbacks!"

That's how they print it over here (Ireland).

How do you 'slam' a government?

He never criticises, never condemns.... he slams. I wonder if you have to be a bishop to slam? Maybe it's something he's given when they promote him.

Sometimes he 'slates' them. It's all very confusing to a simple mind like mine.

Let's all go out and 'slam' the government.... start a slamorution as opposed to a revolution.
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Old 02-13-2008, 10:30 PM
Status: "going on a cruise" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: New England
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Just ducking in here to say that PRESS STUD is what my friend calls a snap -- thank you to the person who answered my question. Whew. And I thought I knew some Brit English.

Another whole area of confusion is the parts of a house. First, the cooker, then passageway for hallway, cupboard? for closet......and ad infinitum.
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Old 02-14-2008, 03:49 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,161 posts, read 2,858,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I watch a lot of British TV on BBC America and PBS, plus when I lived in Germany I used to travel to England on a regular basis for work, so I can easily understand UK English, but I do wonder how they understand us!

Maybe someone can confirm this, but is the phrase "Went missing", as in, "Last evening two hikers went missing in the mountains..." a British phrase? I was taught in journalism school in the '90s that this was incorrect. Now we hear it daily on the news and it sounds strange.

I also hear "Cheers" used commonly on the phone and used in e-mail instead of good bye.

I love the show "Keeping Up Appearances" and find myself picking up words and phrases like "take away" for "carry out" (the Chinese take away), "postal code" instead of "zip code" and others.
I don't think anyone has replied to this from scanning the responses but forgive me if I'm repeating someone...

Yes "went missing" is used here in the UK too. I can see people's points about it being technically incorrect but there are plenty of phrases in common use that wouldn't make sense for example if you were learning English as a second language logically. But it's a common phrase and it's probably in the dictionary as well. "Disappeared" would sound a little too mysterious! Are you saying you'd rather say "..are missing"?

"Post code" is used more commonly than "Post code" incidentally, certainly in speech.

Also "cheers" - it's a sort of combination phrase used for both thanks and goodbye. I often find myself saying "cheers, bye" when I'm leaving a shop, which seems silly as it means both, but it's quite common.

Someone else mentioned passageway/ hallway - I've always used hallway or hall. Passageway to me would mean something that's outside, like with terraced houses (does that need explaining? Houses that are joined together) when you have 2 houses with doors facing each other and an external passage to the pavement (or sidewalk!) - I'd call that a passageway.
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Old 02-14-2008, 03:59 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,161 posts, read 2,858,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northsider View Post
You're welcome.

Let's have another one that's 'cringeworthy' to me. "Bishop slams government cutbacks!"

That's how they print it over here (Ireland).

How do you 'slam' a government?

He never criticises, never condemns.... he slams. I wonder if you have to be a bishop to slam? Maybe it's something he's given when they promote him.

Sometimes he 'slates' them. It's all very confusing to a simple mind like mine.

Let's all go out and 'slam' the government.... start a slamorution as opposed to a revolution.
Slam, slate, slur, sl*g off... we do like our sl... words here don't we?! And what about "slug" for punching someone? I'm not keen on that, although you don't hear it that often thankfully.

My pet hates here are "wacky" and "zany". It might be different in the US, but for the UK in my experience (in TV guides especially) they're usually a sure sign that something is going to be about as original and hilarious as a brick . And a rather dull one at that.

It's a bit like having a sign on your desk saying "You don't have to be mad to work here but it helps" - best way to get punched I reckon.
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Old 02-14-2008, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
11,289 posts, read 12,930,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RH1 View Post
I don't think anyone has replied to this from scanning the responses but forgive me if I'm repeating someone...

Yes "went missing" is used here in the UK too. I can see people's points about it being technically incorrect but there are plenty of phrases in common use that wouldn't make sense for example if you were learning English as a second language logically. But it's a common phrase and it's probably in the dictionary as well. "Disappeared" would sound a little too mysterious! Are you saying you'd rather say "..are missing"?

"Post code" is used more commonly than "Post code" incidentally, certainly in speech.

Also "cheers" - it's a sort of combination phrase used for both thanks and goodbye. I often find myself saying "cheers, bye" when I'm leaving a shop, which seems silly as it means both, but it's quite common.

Someone else mentioned passageway/ hallway - I've always used hallway or hall. Passageway to me would mean something that's outside, like with terraced houses (does that need explaining? Houses that are joined together) when you have 2 houses with doors facing each other and an external passage to the pavement (or sidewalk!) - I'd call that a passageway.
Thany you for the explanations. I was taught to say, "Two hikers are missing in the Rocky Mountains. They were last seen Tuesday evening", rather than, "Two hikers went missing Tuesday evening in the Rocky Mountains".

The phrase just sounds silly to me and gramatically incorrect, but it shows how UK and US English are possibly integrating a bit. I'm sure some American English has crept in to bastardize true English over the years!
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