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Old 02-06-2008, 07:13 AM
 
9 posts, read 49,677 times
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Arrow Moving from UK to USA

Hi guys,

I've searched the forums and read several threads about people wanting to move TO the UK... but as they say it always looks greener on the other side...

So i have been seriously considering moving from the UK to USA.

Im not sure if this is the right subforum for that sort of advice, but i figure plenty of you guys are well traveled , so maybe you could drop us a line on some of the basic requirements?

Background:

Im 23 single male, dont really have any family commitments (yet) and can support myself for at least a year or more financially etc, but really i want to settle in USA...

the dilemma is...I am a British Citizen, so... Can i Live, Work, Own Property in USA by just going there? or are there other requirements?

Also i prefer to hold British Citizenship but at the same time i would probably never come back to UK! except for short holidays (that may sound strange but my heart is overseas i think)..

Also how long would i have to live in USA before being entitled to US citizenship?

do you think its smarter to get dual US-UK citizenship?

what do you guys think?
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Old 02-06-2008, 07:27 AM
 
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I am from the UK living in the US. You need a work visa to come and work and for that you need to find a job and the employer has to be willing to sponsor your visa. The visa is much easier to get if you are a college graduate. If not it is based on experience. The other alternative is marry an American!
In all seriousness it is very difficult to get here. My husband had to come on the toursit visa waiver for 3 months, find a job during that 3 months, and then go back to England while they processed his visa. Working for a University is easier but, again, you have to have a degree. Once you are here and working for about 3 years your employer may be willing to sponsor your green card - which is permanent residency. We now have that after being here for 8 years.
You then have to be on that for 5 years before you can get citizenship. You can maintain dual citizenship and probably should - we plan on doing that so our kids can choose where they want to live when they grow up.
I understand the desire to get out of England, the job climate for young people is terrible and house prices are so high you can't even get on that first rung of the ladder. Of course, you could face the same thing here depending on where you want to go. California and New York are very expensive. We have lived in Florida and now North Carolina and it is VERY reasonable.
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Old 02-06-2008, 07:50 AM
 
483 posts, read 1,370,780 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sal23 View Post
the dilemma is...I am a British Citizen, so... Can i Live, Work, Own Property in USA by just going there? or are there other requirements?
It is just as hard to immigrate to the US (legally) as it is to immigrate to the UK.
All sorts of hoops to jump thru, but those I know who have done that don't seem to regret making the move.

However - you might consider a long visit as a tourist first. The US has a lot more variety in terms of scenery, weather, and living conditions than you'll find in England.

Who knows what will appeal to you? Once you find a place that's right for you, then you can start with the job hunt, work permits, etc.
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Old 02-06-2008, 08:15 AM
 
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Thanks for the feedback guys, in terms of employment my uncle here in UK owns a driving school, so our 'family business' if you like is driving instructors.

My ambition really is to jump across the pond and setup a similar outfit in the USA,

[For me i think its going to be a close one between Florida or Texas- initially i had California in the equation too, but from what i hear it has far more expensive so you get more for your buck in other states that may not have as much glamor, but really im attracted by the warm weather and relatively cheaper property prices in particular Texas...i liked the idea of Florida quite alot but the hurricanes scared me away (we get rain all the time here in North England, but tropical storms sound like a whole different ball game for a newbie like me!)

Anyway what i have to research now is...as a UK driving instructor, how easily transferable would that be in the USA - obviously different regulations and examination before i will qualify but if i setup my own school (business) over there - would that exempt me from requiring some kind of employer to sponsor my greencard?

Also i am willing to take on other driving jobs until i get myself sorted with green card, such as Taxi/cab/limo driver (which i assume requires much less documentation etc)
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Old 02-06-2008, 09:37 AM
 
321 posts, read 937,813 times
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I think you have to invest so much money into the US to set up your own business. And I have to be honest there is not the need for driving instructors here as there is in the UK. The kids learn how to drive in school and with a learner's permit go out with their parents. The driving test is so wasy here there is no need for an instructor!!
You would likely need a sponsor for a visa. If you can, take a trip over here...you can be a tourist for 3 months without a visa, and talk to some people.
Oh, and tropical storms are not so bad if you are away from the coast a little...no worse than those times when you get gales in the UK!
For visa info go to USCIS Home Page and look up temporary work visas...particularly H1
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Old 02-06-2008, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Camberville
6,715 posts, read 7,981,881 times
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The British driving exam is a WHOLE other ballgame from the US. I took private driving lessons, but I was in the minority and only did it because my parents were nervous wrecks. Most kids learn to drive just from their parents.
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Old 02-06-2008, 11:58 AM
 
483 posts, read 1,370,780 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sal23 View Post
Thanks for the feedback guys, in terms of employment my uncle here in UK owns a driving school, so our 'family business' if you like is driving instructors.

My ambition really is to jump across the pond and setup a similar outfit in the USA,
As others have said: this may be difficult. Most public school systems offer driving instruction, and the tests are so easy the majority of kids could pass even without
formal instruction. I would suggest some other business.
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Old 02-06-2008, 12:42 PM
 
9 posts, read 49,677 times
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Thanks for the info guys!

lol i think you saved me alot of time and money starting a business that ultimately wouldn't be as lucrative as imagined just with those few lines...

but nah i would visit first and get a good feel for the country before all else, got to plan a proper trip within the next 6 months and take it from there!
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Old 02-06-2008, 12:55 PM
 
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i wouldn't cross california off your list of potential placs to live. Look at the sacramento area places like lincoln are cheap and still pretty close to the big city as well as the mountains and coast. I would travel to texas first before you decide to make the move, it will be a giant culture shock to you when moving there. Texas is our most patriotic state and in my opinion arent as out going and accepting as people in california. the police there are hilarious though.
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Old 02-06-2008, 01:40 PM
 
321 posts, read 937,813 times
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I agree with Cape diem about Texas. I will say that generally the South (Alabama, Tennessee, South Carolina, Georgia etc) are less accepting of immigrants etc. My husband encounters some of that here in North Carolina. Florida is different because there aren't too many native Floridians, they are all "immigrants" of some description! Raleigh Durham area here (where we live) is an exception for the south as it has several large research universities and the research triangle park with IBM, Glaxo Smithkline etc. so, again, this area is full of imports!
Not to be too down on the South, I like it here but you do fight that "you don't belong here" attitude sometimes.
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