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Old 07-20-2009, 03:47 PM
 
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Hello from across the pond,

Michael Moore (who I don't always like, but makes Americans at least think) is his recent movie (last year) suggested that the socialized health care system in the UK, may be a long term positive cultural effect of the British having to pull together and help each other during the World War II (food rationing, the horrible Blitz).

Now certainly the stories I've read about the World War II Blitz in London are truly inspiring and really are moving. As an American, it can make one realize that although 9/11 was horrible, what Britain had to go through from 1940-1942 (or so) was like ten times that much (just not nearly that all destruction all at once).

Do you think that indeed there were long lasting impacts of that experience on British policy and culture in terms of pulling together a couple generations later?
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Old 07-20-2009, 04:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
Hello from across the pond,

Michael Moore (who I don't always like, but makes Americans at least think) is his recent movie (last year) suggested that the socialized health care system in the UK, may be a long term positive cultural effect of the British having to pull together and help each other during the World War II (food rationing, the horrible Blitz).

Now certainly the stories I've read about the World War II Blitz in London are truly inspiring and really are moving. As an American, it can make one realize that although 9/11 was horrible, what Britain had to go through from 1940-1942 (or so) was like ten times that much (just not nearly that all destruction all at once).

Do you think that indeed there were long lasting impacts of that experience on British policy and culture in terms of pulling together a couple generations later?
My understanding of the move to socialized health care was that it was influenced by two main factors.

The first was military necessity (or national security). When Britain mobilized in 1939, the army was horrified at the generally poor state of health of the recruits. No one had realized that one of the effects of the Depression on the population had been a low level of malnutrition for a large proportion of the population.

The second main factor was a tacit social understanding that, in asking the country to fight and to make the sacrifices needed, that there would be a payback after the war. That was why the Labour Party won a landslide victory in 1945.
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