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Old 03-17-2013, 12:20 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
New York actually does match Paris and London. It's Moscow that no one can match.
If we're talking about maybe the central half to 2/3rd s of NYC than it matches or surpasses Paris or London (NYC has better coverage in some ways). Further out, not really. For example, in eastern Queens, past the edge of the subway, the choice is:

1) slow bus then transfer to subway. $2.50
2) LIRR. Many don't live in walking distance, so another bus is required. Two separate tickets, rather pricey. The LIRR frequency is low, half-hour off-peak weekday on some lines, less on others. The LIRR also brings you to one station in the city center (with a couple of stops along the way in Queens), requiring an additional subway transfer.

The Paris RER has better coverage than the LIRR and higher frequency, so the outer areas get better service. London's commuter rail is far more extensive than NYC's and generally higher frequency. And for NYC for some subway lines, taking it at the end can be a very slow journey due to lots of stops. Paris and London may come a bit ahead, though where the NYC subway exists the coverage is good.

Looking at outer neighborhood to outer neighborhood trips (or suburb to suburb), New York City comes out worst of all. Not sure about Moscow, but its layout concentrates people at high density at the periphery, the reverse of all 3 other cities.
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Old 03-17-2013, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Paris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
How is the Transilien like in Paris? Does it compared at all to New York's commuter rail networks (like LIRR)?
I've never been to NYC so can't compare with the LIRR. If you've been to Berlin, the RER is like the S-Bahn, with lines going through the city, whereas the Transilien stops at the main stations like the LIRR.
In directions already served by a RER line, the Transilien doesn't stop at all for up to 20 miles and then serves obscure commuter towns/villages (for example Paris-Melun-Montereau, southeast on this map). Trains are less frequent than on the RER network (one every 10 minutes or slightly less at rush hour, compared to one every 2 minutes for the RER on central sections).
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Old 03-17-2013, 09:01 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rozenn View Post
I've never been to NYC so can't compare with the LIRR. If you've been to Berlin, the RER is like the S-Bahn, with lines going through the city, whereas the Transilien stops at the main stations like the LIRR.
In directions already served by a RER line, the Transilien doesn't stop at all for up to 20 miles and then serves obscure commuter towns/villages (for example Paris-Melun-Montereau, southeast on this map). Trains are less frequent than on the RER network (one every 10 minutes or slightly less at rush hour, compared to one every 2 minutes for the RER on central sections).
The LIRR has a similar pattern: mimimal stops (often skips entirely, particularly rush hour trains) once it gets to areas served by a subway (more like 10 miles, than 20 miles though):

MTA LIRR - LIRR Map

The subway lines terminate at the Jamaica and Flushing Main Station train stations marked by white dots. Westward, you can see a far fewer stations, though the map is quite to scale, it's close. During rush hour, each LIRR branch might have a train every 15 minutes or so.
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Old 07-06-2015, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Crown Heights
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For the area it does serve, the NY Subway does it better than anything except the Paris Metro. That being said, lots of European cities have better overall coverage than NYC (Paris, London, Berlin, Madrid come to mind)
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Old 07-07-2015, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
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I think anybody who thinks that any American city can compete with the public transit systems in Europe, or any other part of the world, is fooling themselves.

Everybody is talking about NYC, but to put it in perspective. The trains in Tokyo in the 1950s looked sleeker and more modern then any train in NYC today. The rail system in NYC was built in the early 1900s, before the US decided to abandon public transportation for private automobiles. There has been no significant investment in it since 1950. It's like it's been stuck in a time warp since then. It never changes. It never modernizes.

It's only going to get worse. Right now they are constructing Chinese made bullet train systems all over South America. Even if the plans for high-speed rail in the US take off, it will be some cheeper scaled down American version bullet trains. The US is 75 years behind the rest of the world in public transit. It would be almost impossible for us the catch up now.

So to answer the question, I don't think public transportation in any American city can compare to most South American cities, let alone Europe.
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Old 07-08-2015, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Crown Heights
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Yeah no doubt the New York Subway doesn't look anywhere near as clean or sleek as rapid transit systems in the rest of the world and isn't kept up nearly as well. What I (and I think most other people) were talking about was not cleanliness or how sleek the trains are but actual coverage and level of service, because that is what matters to residents and actually affects how the city functions. In that area, NY is comparable to many of the best systems in the world even if nowhere else in the US is.
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Old 07-11-2015, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Philly
1,033 posts, read 723,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayp1188 View Post
NYC can definitely hold its own against any European city when it comes to public transportation.

Chicago and DC have good public transportation, but not quite up to the standard of European cities.

Boston has decent public transportation, but really not comparable to Europe.

SF and Philly..no way. Both cities have pretty pathetic public transportation when not judging by American standards.

Portland has a very nice system (aesthetically and technologically speaking), but most of the city is still extremely inconvenient to live in without having access to a car.
Maybe in terms of heavy rail transit, but that's about it. Even with heavy rail transit, the Market-Frankford Line has an average weekday ridership that nears 160,000.

SEPTA is one of only two U.S. transit agencies to offer all 5 major types of transit (light rail, heavy rail, commuter rail, bus, and electric trolleybus). The only other U.S. transit agency is Boston's MBTA. MBTA also has ferry service, but so will Philly (though it will be operated by the Delaware River Port Authority and not SEPTA).

SEPTA's Regional Rail service is unmatched by any other North American city, and relatively few cities in the world. The Pennsylvania Railroad and Reading Railroad used to operate two different commuter services that were taken over by SEPTA in 1981. Before the late 1970s, SEPTA operated its commuter rail lines (under contract to Conrail) out of Suburban Station for ex-Pennsy lines and Reading Terminal for ex-Reading lines, respectively. Mayor Frank Rizzo pushed to unify the two systems. This push became the Center City Commuter Connection, or the Commuter Tunnel. Because of this project, one of the most redefining transit projects in U.S. history, commuter trains are through-routed through Philadelphia at five city stops (University City, 30th Street Station, Suburban Station, Jefferson, and Temple University). Philadelphia is the ONLY U.S. city capable of having commuter rail service similar to the S-Bahn. This is why SEPTA Regional Rail lines formerly had an "R-#" system.

The only real comparison to SEPTA's trolley service is Boston's service. Although Sunbelt cities have planned and built light rail lines, none are quite like SEPTA's trolley lines. The Subway-Surface Lines (Routes 10,11,13,43, and 36) traverse dense, mature, established West Philadelphia neighborhoods. They then travel underground through University City and loop around City Hall with a final stop at 13th and Juniper, providing for free interchange with the Market-Frankord Line and Broad Street Line. The 15 trolley is similar to the Subway-Surface routes, except that it does not travel underground. The ex-Philadelphia and Western suburban trolley lines (Routes 101 and 102) travel through established suburban Delaware County neighborhoods. Media, PA is considered America's only true suburb since the 102 runs through its downtown on Orange Street.

SEPTA's bus service is expansive. SEPTA buses serve all 5 PA counties in the Philadelphia area (Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia), Mercer County in NJ, and New Castle County in DE. It runs buses through its City Division, Victory Division, and Frontier Division. One downside about the City Division is that buses stop at every Center City intersection. When I was in Paris a few months ago, I stayed in the 13th Arrondisment near the Nationale station on Line 6. There was an adjacent bus service that was run like an American-style BRT with a buffered bus lane. In some cases, the bus got me to Place D'Italie faster than Line 6!

SEPTA also has electric trolleybuses. Off the top of my head, Boston and San Francisco are the only other two cities I know of that have this. This type of bus service is extremely environmentally friendly. It adds an extra layer of coverage to SEPTA's ever-present bus service.
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Old 07-13-2015, 04:39 PM
 
125 posts, read 105,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilliesPhan2013 View Post
Maybe in terms of heavy rail transit, but that's about it. Even with heavy rail transit, the Market-Frankford Line has an average weekday ridership that nears 160,000.

SEPTA is one of only two U.S. transit agencies to offer all 5 major types of transit (light rail, heavy rail, commuter rail, bus, and electric trolleybus). The only other U.S. transit agency is Boston's MBTA. MBTA also has ferry service, but so will Philly (though it will be operated by the Delaware River Port Authority and not SEPTA).

SEPTA's Regional Rail service is unmatched by any other North American city, and relatively few cities in the world. The Pennsylvania Railroad and Reading Railroad used to operate two different commuter services that were taken over by SEPTA in 1981. Before the late 1970s, SEPTA operated its commuter rail lines (under contract to Conrail) out of Suburban Station for ex-Pennsy lines and Reading Terminal for ex-Reading lines, respectively. Mayor Frank Rizzo pushed to unify the two systems. This push became the Center City Commuter Connection, or the Commuter Tunnel. Because of this project, one of the most redefining transit projects in U.S. history, commuter trains are through-routed through Philadelphia at five city stops (University City, 30th Street Station, Suburban Station, Jefferson, and Temple University). Philadelphia is the ONLY U.S. city capable of having commuter rail service similar to the S-Bahn. This is why SEPTA Regional Rail lines formerly had an "R-#" system.

The only real comparison to SEPTA's trolley service is Boston's service. Although Sunbelt cities have planned and built light rail lines, none are quite like SEPTA's trolley lines. The Subway-Surface Lines (Routes 10,11,13,43, and 36) traverse dense, mature, established West Philadelphia neighborhoods. They then travel underground through University City and loop around City Hall with a final stop at 13th and Juniper, providing for free interchange with the Market-Frankord Line and Broad Street Line. The 15 trolley is similar to the Subway-Surface routes, except that it does not travel underground. The ex-Philadelphia and Western suburban trolley lines (Routes 101 and 102) travel through established suburban Delaware County neighborhoods. Media, PA is considered America's only true suburb since the 102 runs through its downtown on Orange Street.

SEPTA's bus service is expansive. SEPTA buses serve all 5 PA counties in the Philadelphia area (Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia), Mercer County in NJ, and New Castle County in DE. It runs buses through its City Division, Victory Division, and Frontier Division. One downside about the City Division is that buses stop at every Center City intersection. When I was in Paris a few months ago, I stayed in the 13th Arrondisment near the Nationale station on Line 6. There was an adjacent bus service that was run like an American-style BRT with a buffered bus lane. In some cases, the bus got me to Place D'Italie faster than Line 6!

SEPTA also has electric trolleybuses. Off the top of my head, Boston and San Francisco are the only other two cities I know of that have this. This type of bus service is extremely environmentally friendly. It adds an extra layer of coverage to SEPTA's ever-present bus service.
San Francisco's heavy rail system has ridership of about 425K per day. That's better than Philly's.
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Old 07-13-2015, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Philly
1,033 posts, read 723,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Exlamatir View Post
San Francisco's heavy rail system has ridership of about 425K per day. That's better than Philly's.
I know. Philly has a little while to go before we get our ridership numbers up to that. Also, be aware that I mentioned only one heavy rail line. SEPTA also operates the Broad Street Line and Broad-Ridge Spur. Philly really has four heavy rail lines, but PATCO isn't operated by SEPTA; it is operated by the Delaware River Port Authority.
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Old 07-15-2015, 07:32 PM
 
Location: World
3,648 posts, read 3,516,386 times
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Other countries are picking up. This is Delhi Metro in India. NYC seems to be the only American City which can match even Asian cities in Public Transit, forget about Europe.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vksbA5UiUgw
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