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Old 04-22-2012, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
8,846 posts, read 5,262,163 times
Reputation: 2793
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
And that density has almost no bearing on its urbanity and walkability. Check out these corners in Koreatown, one of which the tour guide calls "one of the busiest in Koreatown" (at 2:43). Yet there are hardly any pedestrians to be found. To be the second largest city in the United States, you would think that it's most urban and densely populated residential district would be able to generate more foot traffic than Takoma Park, MD.

This is pathetic. You can't even argue that it's just a bad time of day because we DO see plenty of cars.


Welcome to Koreatown - YouTube

Compare the above to Shaw/U Street in DC. There's no comparison really. One city is designed for walking. The other is designed for driving, which the Koreatown video makes abundantly clear.


Scene In: U Street - YouTube
Good god next time I'm in DC I'll know what neighborhood to avoid. Could those people be any more annoying?

Note: those videos are terrible, terrible evidence
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
8,846 posts, read 5,262,163 times
Reputation: 2793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitzrovian View Post
I think we have different conceptions of what adjacent means. To me, Chelsea, West Village and Soho are adjacent. South End, Back Bay and Beacon Hill are adjacent. Center City and University City are adjacent.
These are all tiny neighborhoods (besides South End).

It would be like me saying, the Yucca Corridor, Franklin Village, Thai Town and Little Armenia are adjacent neighborhoods - all located within Hollywood.
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
5,347 posts, read 2,367,123 times
Reputation: 2739
Bajan dancing around the same 1.5-2 sq mile area in Washington DC. The lulz. Most of these "adjacent neighborhoods" are Santa's Village tiny. Might as well compare it to downtown L.A.

And despite his claims, Koreatown definitely has pedestrian activity. The neighborhood has tracts that would not be out of place in Manhattan, after all. It's also 3-4 miles away from DTLA. Here's what it looks like 3-4 miles away from D.C.'s core:

cleveland park dc - Google Maps

Hollywood (a massive 3.5 sq mile neighborhood) is 7 miles from DTLA. Here's what it looks like 6 miles away from downtown D.C.:

colonial village washington d.c. - Google Maps

Los Angeles still looks quite urbanized 16 miles away from its downtown core, in Santa Monica. Here's what it looks like 10 miles away from D.C.:

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=west+f...en&sa=N&tab=wl
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
16,339 posts, read 8,859,263 times
Reputation: 5635
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Good god next time I'm in DC I'll know what neighborhood to avoid. Could those people be any more annoying?

Note: those videos are terrible, terrible evidence
No they're not. Both videos show multiple blocks in the same district. I provided the densest neighborhood in Los Angeles so that there would be no whining ("Oh, but you didn't post our census tract that contains 90,000 people!"). If that's the best that LA has to offer (and Shaw is not the best DC has to offer because Georgetown, Adams-Morgan, Gallery Place and possibly Columbia Heights all get significantly more foot traffic), then that's sad. I mean, really, really sad.
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
5,347 posts, read 2,367,123 times
Reputation: 2739
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
No they're not. Both videos show multiple blocks in the same district. I provided the densest neighborhood in Los Angeles so that there would be no whining ("Oh, but you didn't post our census tract that contains 90,000 people!"). If that's the best that LA has to offer (and Shaw is not the best DC has to offer because Georgetown, Adams-Morgan, Gallery Place and possibly Columbia Heights all get significantly more foot traffic), then that's sad. I mean, really, really sad.
How many sq miles are those neighborhoods combined? Maybe two? It's like every street is a neighborhood in D.C.
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
16,339 posts, read 8,859,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
And despite his claims, Koreatown definitely has pedestrian activity. The neighborhood has tracts that would not be out of place in Manhattan, after all.
Show us. Is it walking through the "drive thru" window at the El Pollo Loco? The comparison to Manhattan is quite laughable, btw. And why the deference to Manhattan? It's like saying, "But of course we're inferior to NYC!" LOL.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
It's also 3-4 miles away from DTLA.
The neighborhoods closer to Downtown LA obviously are not any denser or more urban. Koreatown is the densest neighborhood in LA, right? So everything in between Koreatown and DTLA is going to be less intense than that. And Koreatown hardly provides an "intense" urban experience. It is an area characterized by little pedestrian traffic, wide roads, strip malls and drive thru restaurants.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
Hollywood (a massive 3.5 sq mile neighborhood) is 7 miles from DTLA.
Harlem would be 20 miles from Midtown if Manhattan were configured like LA. That's what happens with sprawl. Things get pushed out and away over enormous distances. Hollywood may be massive, but it's full of parking lots, wide roads and unwalkable patches whereas the West Village is full of narrow roads, virtually no off-street parking, and a completely walkable urban environment. If it makes you happier, we could demolish every structure in Manhattan and re-arrange it LA-style so that we have 652 sq. miles of strip malls and parking lots.
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
16,339 posts, read 8,859,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
How many sq miles are those neighborhoods combined? Maybe two? It's like every street is a neighborhood in D.C.
And it's like every street is Arlington, Virginia in LA.

By the way, why is LA obsessed with becoming more like the East Coast? I mean, if it were fine the way it is, then there'd be no need to insitute road diets, for example.

narrow streets: los angeles: 3rd street + the grove drive

You don't see people in New York or Boston saying, "Geez, I wish we had more six-lane roads with 55 mph speed limits, more parking lots, more strip malls, less public transit, a more decentralized core, and an auto-centric lifestlye!" Why do you spend all of your time here trying to prove that LA is more New York than New York?
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
16,339 posts, read 8,859,263 times
Reputation: 5635
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
These are all tiny neighborhoods (besides South End).
Okay...

If were to adopt your logic, then LA would also be significantly more urban than Manhattan. The Village, SoHo and Chelsea are just "tiny neighborhoods" whereas Hollywood has a footprint of urbanity that's 4 or 5 times the size of Chelsea.

That's totally ridiculous. What matters is the way a city or area functions. And Manhattan functions very differently from every other place in America over a much larger geographic footprint. It's not uncommon to find places with miles and miles and miles of parking lots and drive thrus. It is uncommon, however, to find tightly-packed, cohesive neighborhoods spanning several square miles. LA obviously can't offer that. Chicago, DC, Philly, Boston and SF also fall short, but do a much better job than LA.
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:47 AM
 
Location: NYC
1,713 posts, read 1,042,725 times
Reputation: 894
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
These are all tiny neighborhoods (besides South End).

It would be like me saying, the Yucca Corridor, Franklin Village, Thai Town and Little Armenia are adjacent neighborhoods - all located within Hollywood.
Yeah *like*... Except no it's not.

This:

Little Armenia, Los Angeles, CA - Google Maps

Is in no way comparable to this:

Back Bay, Boston, MA - Google Maps

or this:

Beacon Hill, Boston, MA - Google Maps

I know you've lived in Boston, so you should know the difference.

And I am not even gonna address the silly point about census tract density.
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
16,339 posts, read 8,859,263 times
Reputation: 5635
Here's another comparison:

Downtown LA. Whoa! This is intense!


Downtown Los Angeles HD - YouTube

Downtown Chicago. So sleepy. That El train rumbling above the streets makes me so....sleepy...(yawn)


Riding the Chicago Loop - YouTube
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