U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-28-2010, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Lake Charles, LA
2,189 posts, read 2,399,984 times
Reputation: 737

Advertisements

I know, that this is often referred to suburban areas, however, in city areas this is becoming more common(i.e. the label cookie cutter). I know when I think cookie cutter, I think houses w/ the same colour brick, and half assed thrown together. Also, a lack of large trees and a lack of any landscape(only shurbs!)

What do you think makes a neighborhood take the label of "cookie cutter"? What can be done to fix it? What would you like to see done to improve urbanization and suburban sprawl? How about general development?

NOTE: All opinions will be accepted here. You may or may not think anything needs to be changed about urbanization, I'd still like to hear your side.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-28-2010, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
13,143 posts, read 19,186,968 times
Reputation: 14007
What is a "cookie cutter" neighborhood? A PUD with homes that all look/feel the same, built with all the same standardized materials and designed with maximum profit for the developer in mind, not quality, livability or adaptability.

The solution? um... tear them all down and start again? No, build a giant wall around the development and put future poor people in them.

No matter how you change them up superficially, they will always represent an inferior development plan.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2010, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
7,991 posts, read 16,048,592 times
Reputation: 9332
I think cookie cutter is simply anything cheaply and quickly mass produced at a mediocre quality ("value engineered"). Of course you hear it in reference to suburbia quite frequently, but it does apply to many newer "urban" developments (think of almost any new housing project or large-scale development).

It's worth noting that while many historic neighborhoods share similar architectural themes on a large scale, most were built at a MUCH higher quality and many were built independently of the buildings (as opposed to being mass produced). I guess you could look at some of the older lower-class neighborhoods in many cities (I'm thinking along the lines of the old Barbell Tenements you can still find in parts of Manhattan) and call those "cookie cutter" as they were mass produced, but they were still built at a MUCH higher quality than what the pre-cast alucobond and glass crap that's sprouting up all over today. Thankfully it's mostly lower quality so it won't last`forever.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2010, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
Reputation: 3232
Cookie cutter = cheap, mass produced, modular. Same design - same vinyl siding, same brick trim, same prominent three car garage door in front, same everything. No creativity. The solution? A bulldozer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2010, 08:05 PM
k_s
 
Location: Texas
408 posts, read 781,926 times
Reputation: 199
Cookie Cutter = McMansion developments.

There's really no way to "fix" the developments once they've built -- not that their residents would want them changed, anyway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2010, 08:29 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
I think cookie cutter is simply anything cheaply and quickly mass produced at a mediocre quality ("value engineered"). Of course you hear it in reference to suburbia quite frequently, but it does apply to many newer "urban" developments (think of almost any new housing project or large-scale development).

It's worth noting that while many historic neighborhoods share similar architectural themes on a large scale, most were built at a MUCH higher quality and many were built independently of the buildings (as opposed to being mass produced). I guess you could look at some of the older lower-class neighborhoods in many cities (I'm thinking along the lines of the old Barbell Tenements you can still find in parts of Manhattan) and call those "cookie cutter" as they were mass produced, but they were still built at a MUCH higher quality than what the pre-cast alucobond and glass crap that's sprouting up all over today. Thankfully it's mostly lower quality so it won't last`forever.
It also applies to many older neighborhoods in many cities. There are neighborhoods in Denver where the same 2-3 styles of houses go on for blocks, ditto many other cities I have been in, e.g. Chicago.

It's nonsense that these older houses were better quality built, particularly the tenements. My nephew lived in an old duplex in Denver that was the same style as many other homes in that neighborhood, and indeed, all over Denver. It was drafty, had few kitchen cupboards and virtually NO counter area; when taking a shower the water wouldn't flow down the drain properly, the wiring was obviously bad (lights flickered), and that's just for starts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2010, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Wexford PA / Clear Lake TX
8,224 posts, read 27,114,669 times
Reputation: 4502
Cookie cutters are going up in both urban and suburban areas. It's just you only hear one side of the story in here most of the time.

Suburban, as noted above. Usually a neighborhood consists of 4-5 floor plans, each one with a mirror plan. And maybe 3-4 different brick schemes. Some have turned into ghettos, some haven't. I know of both types of neighborhoods around here. Whatever the case may be, the whole tree thing is a moot point. Eventually they grow, and tear up any concrete in their way.

Urban cookie cutters, many of those "affordable" townhomes for first-time home buyers but some of the upscale ones are the same way. Usually they are the same 3 models all side by side with the same garages underneath. Glorified apartments. Speaking of which, apartments, no matter where they are are usually extremely cookie cutter.

I'll bet most people in here live in some kind of modular design home. And I'll also bet that most people in newer houses/apartments are living in a more energy efficient, better quality home vs the older ones. As with automobiles, large advances have been made over the decades.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2010, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Lake Charles, LA
2,189 posts, read 2,399,984 times
Reputation: 737
It does happen, but every now and then you'll see a residential area that incorporates some of the newer designs w/ the old, and what is becoming more popular is the TND (traditional neighborhood design). These are more of a mixed income, and they focus more of the culture of a particular area, rather than just mass produced bull****. There is a real estate company in Louisiana, called the PAR homes who's focus is custom homes. Then in my city, Past the country club, there are some neighborhoods that blend new w/ old. While some of the homes are the newer "suburban" homes, there are others that are vintage Louisiana. IMO, the worst of the suburban sprawl(at least that I've seen anyway) would be Florida, who knew that there were that many different types of beige. The homes have no character whatsoever and again, BEIGE BEIGE BEIGE. Those ugly ass bricks(which would be fine if used on one or two homes, but not 200 homes).

http://www.olowalu.net/index.cfm?fus...age&PageID=158

Look at this comparison that I found between TND(similar to new urbanism) and suburban sprawl.

Last edited by pandorafan5687; 07-28-2010 at 11:23 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2010, 12:22 PM
 
217 posts, read 588,048 times
Reputation: 300
Every apartment building built in Manhattan in the 1940's-1960's is a cookie-cutter brown or white brick multistory box. To say nothing of public housing projects - the epitome of cookie-cutter, architectureless disfunction.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2010, 03:46 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,131,199 times
Reputation: 1406
Rows of housing and buildings that look exactly alike, maybe alternating between 3 or 4 variants, but all retaining the exact same colors and aesthetics. Also, these new mid-rise apartment buildings that appear to be popping up all around the country now. From my understanding there supposed to replace the suburban (large complex with multiple buildings and surface parking) style apartments with a denser street level feel. The are a large improvement from the gated complex, but they make them all look exactly the same. No originality or detail whatsoever.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top