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Old 06-26-2007, 12:02 PM
 
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Which city in the U.S. has the best public transportation system? Let's factor in busses, light rail and streetcars. What's the going rate for monthly passes and general fares?
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Old 06-26-2007, 02:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supernova7 View Post
Which city in the U.S. has the best public transportation system? Let's factor in busses, light rail and streetcars. What's the going rate for monthly passes and general fares?
APTA/Oct '06
Go>>>
APTA: Top Public Transportation Leaders Are Honored By The American Public Transportation Association (APTA)


-Beaver County Transit Authority (BCTA), Rochester, PA (Category: Providing fewer than 1 million annual passenger trips.)

-Stark Area Regional Transit Authority (SARTA), Canton, OH (Category: Providing more than 1 million and fewer than 4 million annual passenger trips.)

-Central New York Regional Transportation Authority (CNYRTA), Syracuse, NY (Category: Providing more than 4 million but fewer than 30 million annual passenger trips.)

-Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA), Los Angeles, CA (Category: Providing more than 30 million annual passenger trips.)
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Old 06-26-2007, 08:11 PM
 
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I read that info as well. I think there is a big difference between how citizens rate their local public transit and the ratings made by the APA. The CNYRTA is a good one but I wouldn't agree with the rest.
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Old 06-26-2007, 08:37 PM
 
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Good topic but I have no personal knowledge of cities other than my own.

Some solutions are needed --many plans being considered. I hope things work out for the best.
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Old 06-27-2007, 01:30 AM
 
Location: The 12th State
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I thought san francisco has a nice variety of public transportation
BART
CalTrain
Muni
Street Cars
and bus lines
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Old 06-27-2007, 07:00 AM
j33
 
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The only systems in the US I've ridden on more than a couple of times are the system in the city I live in (chicago) and that of new york and both systems seem to be okay in that they allow people in some parts of the city to get on without a car (not all parts of the city though, I wouldn't want to live on the far south or west side of chicago without a car nor would I want to live on the edges of new york cities outer boroughs without one either).

In my opinion, a good public transportation system allows one to live without need of a car in ones day to day life.

That being said, it seems like many cities are struggling to keep their public transportations alive and properly funded so they can run.
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Old 06-27-2007, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Expatriate Philadelphian in Northern Virginia
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Based on my personal experience and/or bias, I would say the following metros:

1. San Francisco

2. New York

3. Philadelphia

4. Washington, DC

5. Chicago

6. Boston
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Old 02-27-2009, 07:25 PM
 
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Smile My list

My list:

1) NYC
2) Boston
3) Chicago
4) Philly
5) Washington DC
6) San Francisco

I've spent a lot of time in most of the cities in the US that I can imagine living without a car. I've lived in DC and Boston, my brother has lived in Philly and Chicago (both of which have too many areas with poor coverage for me to really consider living without a car), and I have spent an enormous amount of time in San Francisco and NYC for work. I've also spent a lot of time in some cities where you could probably get by w/o a car, even though they have no good public transit (it's just they're small enough). Particularly, Seattle, Portland and Austin. The only places where I'd definitely be willing to live without a car are NYC and Boston.

I think San Francisco is VERY overrated. Yes, there are three different train systems. But none of them cover the city well, nor do they do a good job in aggregate. Plus, you can't transfer between the train systems anyway!! I usually end up cabbing or walking everywhere in San Fran.

I know people tend to rate DC higher than Boston, but having lived in both places, I can say it's VERY easy to live without a car in Boston, and impossible to do in DC. Many reasons:

1) DC actually has pretty poor Metro coverage for important parts of the city. Georgetown is a surprisingly far and unpleasant walk from Foggy Bottom (about 20 mins to Wisconsin and M). And, it's just as long to get from Adams Morgan to the closest metro stop, even though the name of the Metro stop is Adams Morgan!!!

2) DC has extremely poor coverage of the suburbs. The commuter rail is very important to the transit system. How easy is it for people to get into the city without driving? In DC, there isn't a real commuter rail (VRE is so crappy it doesn't count). And the metro doesn't go anywhere near deeply enough into the population base. In DC, the only option for most of the rural population is to drive to a stop that's close to the interstate, at which point they've gone most of the way to their destination. Plus, there isn't enough parking.

3) In DC, most of the jobs are actually in the suburbs, positioned around the beltway (and generally not close to the Metro). In Boston, plenty of jobs are in the Rt 128 corridor, but I have gone to meetings all over the Boston metro area by taking the commuter rail out, then catching a short bus or cab ride the rest of the way. I live in the city, so I do not need a car, period. In DC, I could live right by Union Station, but if I had to go out to Reston or Rockville a lot, I would be hosed.

4) Where the metro does stop in the burbs (and this is true in some places in the city), the surrounding area is generally not walkable. Arlington I consider part of the city (it's part of the original land grant after all), but by the time you get out to East Falls Church and West Falls Church, it's totally unwalkable. For instance, my friends and I used to hang out at a wine bar that is no more than a mile walk from West Falls Church, but along route 7 and on the other side, which is stress inducing and horrible. They don't really expect you want to walk next to a major road, and they sure as hell don't expect you to cross it. Cab availability at West Falls Church was very spotty as well. I eventually gave up and just drove in and drank a lot less.

Yes, the green line is pretty slow and crowded, but it's not actually too much slower than DC, and it's only crucial for the area West of Hynes. Yes, DC's cars are often "nicer", but I don't care if my train looks old, I care if it gets me somewhere efficiently. And, the flat fee, no-badge-out thing is outstanding, in comparison to DC's ridiculously complex fare schedule. And, the T is far cheaper than the Metro, too!

In short, I'm of the opinion that anyone who ranks DC's public transit anywhere near Boston has never lived in both places.
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Old 02-27-2009, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Sandy Springs, Georgia
256 posts, read 467,147 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tone509 View Post
Based on my personal experience and/or bias, I would say the following metros:

1. San Francisco

2. New York

3. Philadelphia

4. Washington, DC

5. Chicago

6. Boston
Yep, that sums it up perfectly.

Case closed.

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Old 02-27-2009, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Boston
5,404 posts, read 9,451,811 times
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I think New York City has far and away the most extensive, but I don't know if I'd say it's the best.

My top 6 would go:

1) DC
2) NYC
3) Chicago
4) Philly
5) Boston
6) San Fran
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