U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Was urban renewal worth it
Yes 18 34.62%
No 19 36.54%
A bit of both 14 26.92%
I don't care 1 1.92%
Voters: 52. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-06-2010, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Limbo
6,475 posts, read 6,186,999 times
Reputation: 6239

Advertisements

A lot of cities have seen some very historic and wonderful buildings torn down due to urban renewal. Since most of this destruction has happened decades ago, I ask if it was worth it. Would you rather have more of the older buildings in your downtown/core or nice shiny skyscrapers? Remember, a lot of the times an old building gets taken down, for years and years it's a surface parking lot. Shame.



Last edited by emcee squared; 09-06-2010 at 10:33 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-06-2010, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,604,149 times
Reputation: 390
Detroit's been seeing alot of urban renewal in its inner city neighborhoods, and it's completely worth it.
A few years ago, Brush Park looked like this


Abandoned houses in Detroit (http://www.flickr.com/photos/kbauman/2185664666/ - broken link) by Kevin Bauman (http://www.flickr.com/people/kbauman/ - broken link), on Flickr


And, now, much of it has either been restored, or cleared out for new development, such as this

Brush Park, Detroit, MI - Google Maps
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2010, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Limbo
6,475 posts, read 6,186,999 times
Reputation: 6239
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remisc View Post
Detroit's been seeing alot of urban renewal in its inner city neighborhoods, and it's completely worth it.
A few years ago, Brush Park looked like this


Abandoned houses in Detroit (http://www.flickr.com/photos/kbauman/2185664666/ - broken link) by Kevin Bauman (http://www.flickr.com/people/kbauman/ - broken link), on Flickr


And, now, much of it has either been restored, or cleared out for new development, such as this

Brush Park, Detroit, MI - Google Maps
That's cool. How much of that is happening in Detroit? When I look at Google Maps or something, it looks as if there are vast swaths of the city that are abandoned.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2010, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,604,149 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by emcee squared View Post
That's cool. How much of that is happening in Detroit? When I look at Google Maps or something, it looks as if there are vast swaths of the city that are abandoned.
Right now, they're focusing on the core areas of the city, like Downtown, Brush Park, Corktown, etc. Mayor Bing's been tearing down all those vacant homes, maintaining vacant lots, and going after slum lords. Areas along the river have been rehabbed, for the most part, with some areas dominated by a suburban feel (newer tract housing, even a few McMansions), including my future neighborhood, the Marina District. So, while this isn't going on in a large scale, like so many people here would LOVE to see, it's still happening.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2010, 12:33 PM
 
1,084 posts, read 3,473,831 times
Reputation: 338
the guy who did urban renewal through out the US in the 60's and 70's ****ed up the US for generations and if i can se him today i would punch him in the face.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2010, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Limbo
6,475 posts, read 6,186,999 times
Reputation: 6239
Quote:
Originally Posted by somebodymiami View Post
the guy who did urban renewal through out the US in the 60's and 70's ****ed up the US for generations and if i can se him today i would punch him in the face.
I think the urban renewal going on in Detroit is much different than what happened years and years ago. Slums being torn down is much more beneficial to a city than ransacking old, glorious buildings. So sad.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2010, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,604,149 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by emcee squared View Post
I think the urban renewal going on in Detroit is much different than what happened years and years ago. Slums being torn down is much more beneficial to a city than ransacking old, glorious buildings. So sad.
Exactly. And, Detroit being so dilapidated and run down, in a way, gave the city much more potential for new construction than most cities. When they tear down blighted properties, that allows them land to do this: Montclair Street, Detroit, MI - Google Maps
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2010, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
915 posts, read 1,662,430 times
Reputation: 1549
Urban renewal was a disaster to say the least. The U.S. could have had beautiful cities, like in Europe. Instead we have vast parking lots, public housing, hideous cement block building etc. I wish we could go back in time and undo the damage we did. We torn down elegant classic ornate brick and stone buildings and replaced them with garbage. Most cities will never recover. Some cities, such as Brooklyn N.Y. were so down on their luck that urban renewal was not extensive. Now look at Park Slope, Brooklyn Heights, Ft.Green and other neighborhoods. Expensive homes, in many cases worth millions, which 40 years ago were considered slums. Urban renewal of the 50's and 60's was arrogant social planning at it's worst. We believed that anything old was junk and a new better way was the way to go. What a joke. Ugly square cold buildings in many cases surrounded but massive blacktop parking. A disaster on our cities worse than the bombing of European cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2010, 01:44 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,570,477 times
Reputation: 5662
depends, I think they should have kept the stuff from the worlds fair in chicago for instance...



I think only a single statue remains...



I think they should have kept a lot of the old mansions in NYC too...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2010, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Limbo
6,475 posts, read 6,186,999 times
Reputation: 6239
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allan Trafton View Post
Urban renewal was a disaster to say the least. The U.S. could have had beautiful cities, like in Europe. Instead we have vast parking lots, public housing, hideous cement block building etc. I wish we could go back in time and undo the damage we did. We torn down elegant classic ornate brick and stone buildings and replaced them with garbage. Most cities will never recover. Some cities, such as Brooklyn N.Y. were so down on their luck that urban renewal was not extensive. Now look at Park Slope, Brooklyn Heights, Ft.Green and other neighborhoods. Expensive homes, in many cases worth millions, which 40 years ago were considered slums. Urban renewal of the 50's and 60's was arrogant social planning at it's worst. We believed that anything old was junk and a new better way was the way to go. What a joke. Ugly square cold buildings in many cases surrounded but massive blacktop parking. A disaster on our cities worse than the bombing of European cities.
Right on the money.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top