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Old 12-26-2010, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 23,628,176 times
Reputation: 6103

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I love the article. My town is already doing that and our unemployment has dropped 4Q straight.

The waterfrong warehouses are being converted into green lofts, office space and stores. Traffic was rerouted to closs off the street and create a walkable space to food and entertainment. It doesn't happen overnight but it is certainly exciting to watch.
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Old 12-26-2010, 02:36 PM
 
138 posts, read 261,554 times
Reputation: 91
Cars have only been in common usage about 100 years. Who is to say that cannot change in the next 100, or even 50, or 25.

I feel automobiles will always be around, it only makes sense. They have important application in undeveloped areas, rural, and even suburban. However I feel our cities will no longer prioritize for them. Cities will once again prioritize the pedestrian, and for longer trips we will have public transportation.

The trend is to move into urban cores across the world. These places will only become more dense.

We have to. To better humanity.
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Old 12-28-2010, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Parkridge, East Knoxville, TN
460 posts, read 860,013 times
Reputation: 354
Actually cable tv subscribers fell for the first time for the last 2 quarters. Automobile miles driven peaked in 2007, and although I'm sure they will go up again, miles driven per capita will probably continue to fall. Once it is evident that we peak oil is behind us and the price of oil and gas skyrockets cars will really stop going anywhere.
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Old 12-28-2010, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, AUSTINtx
3,312 posts, read 4,750,060 times
Reputation: 1853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That article is very long, and I didn't find the quote about suburbanites spending 24% of their income on transportation. However, in the past I have found such numbers to be wildly inflated b/c of assumptions about driving expensive late-model cars, financing the purchase of cars with loan-shark rates, etc. One can pay cash for a car and keep it for 10+ years, as we have for our last several vehicles, and the cost per mile driven goes down dramatically.
Maybe so but I did a True Cost to Own on two vehicles over 5 years, a Nissan Altima and a GMC Yukon, the mid-level models for each on edmunds.com. Over 5 years the depreciation, gas, taxes, maintenance, repairs and insurance on the Altima was $548/month and the Yukon was $897 for a total of $1445/mo. Yes there are cheaper alternatives, I could of done a Civic and a Kia minivan but it still seems expensive when you consider a house payment in the suburbs of Texas for the average family is around $900 to $1300. Spending more on transportation than housing is what another poster refers to as the "two car trap" and I think he's right b/c in the long term real estate appreciates but transportation is a consumable.
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Old 12-28-2010, 07:48 PM
Status: "On Break" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,413 posts, read 91,841,888 times
Reputation: 28071
Quote:
Originally Posted by verybadgnome View Post
Maybe so but I did a True Cost to Own on two vehicles over 5 years, a Nissan Altima and a GMC Yukon, the mid-level models for each on edmunds.com. Over 5 years the depreciation, gas, taxes, maintenance, repairs and insurance on the Altima was $548/month and the Yukon was $897 for a total of $1445/mo. Yes there are cheaper alternatives, I could of done a Civic and a Kia minivan but it still seems expensive when you consider a house payment in the suburbs of Texas for the average family is around $900 to $1300. Spending more on transportation than housing is what another poster refers to as the "two car trap" and I think he's right b/c in the long term real estate appreciates but transportation is a consumable.
A lot of this money, however, isn't exactly being spent. Depreciation is not money spent. It may be money lost, but just how much is lost depends on the length of time you own your vehicle. We've only owned one vehicle less than ten years, and even that, a Ford Fiesta, we owned about 5, even though it was a lemon.
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Old 12-28-2010, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
37,359 posts, read 40,935,629 times
Reputation: 99977
Google (Americans love their cars)
^^^^
Americans love their cars. Like their guns, try and pry that steering wheel from their cold dead hands.

If they were banned or eliminated what would Jay Leno do with all those 100's of cars and motorcycles he owns...
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Old 12-28-2010, 09:33 PM
 
8,280 posts, read 13,221,867 times
Reputation: 3908
Americans love their cars because their gas and the roads are subsidized. Without them, cars become wealthy people's toys again.
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Old 12-29-2010, 03:13 AM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
44,585 posts, read 35,317,298 times
Reputation: 14268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
A lot of this money, however, isn't exactly being spent. Depreciation is not money spent. It may be money lost, but just how much is lost depends on the length of time you own your vehicle. We've only owned one vehicle less than ten years, and even that, a Ford Fiesta, we owned about 5, even though it was a lemon.
I thought the Ford Fiesta just came out?
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Old 12-29-2010, 03:42 AM
 
Location: Sacramento, Placerville
2,157 posts, read 4,455,598 times
Reputation: 1646
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Americans love their cars because their gas and the roads are subsidized. Without them, cars become wealthy people's toys again.
Subsidized gas? You've lost your mind!

Your insistence that people are using the roads for free because you want everyone to use public transportation gives a lot of people the impression you are just another whiny liberal who can't deal with the reality that other people don't share your desire to live in overpriced housing downtown and sit beside some stinking homeless person hauling bags of smelly beer cans and bottles on the train.

Americans pay for the roads through fuel taxes every time they purchase fuel. Additionally, people buying fuel pay for public transit projects.

In some cases local voters have approved a sales tax increase for transportation projects. These are never dedicated to roads, but to a variety of transportation projects.
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Old 12-29-2010, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,162 posts, read 4,590,210 times
Reputation: 2834
Quote:
Originally Posted by verybadgnome View Post
I don't think that is the goal but the middle ground is where a lot of planners are looking. Going from a two car to a one car family in a city with the appropriate infrastructure is a step in the right direction. That suburbanites spend 24% of their income on transportation is a problem:

(The Next Real Estate Boom - Patrick C. Doherty and Christopher B. Leinberger)
Good article. However, one huge factor not discussed is schools. One of the reasons that most cities do not attract the critical mass necessary to affect change is due to the fact that many middle-class families with children will not invest in a community that has poorly-performing schools. They may wholeheartedly agree with everything else but are unwilling to experiment with their child's future during their critical development years. Safety is another concern.

The passing of No Child Left Behind has further stratified many suburban communities with high test scores. Many middle-class families are willing to make sacrifices such as longer commuting times, higher fuel bills, and loss of convenience for their children's best interests.

Somehow this hurdle has to be overcome before we can move forward with redevelopment of the urban core with the younger families. There is resistance from many fronts as property values and the desirability of communities are highly correlated to the quality of schools. Anything that threatens that key characteristic (such as regionalization) will be met with strong opposition.
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