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Old 12-30-2010, 07:47 PM
 
138 posts, read 190,996 times
Reputation: 90

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Quote:
The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) released its monthly “The Transit Savings Report” detailing how riding public transportation on average saves money. The report found that individuals save $9,515 annually (up by a few hundred dollars from this time last year) and up to $793 per month based on the average national gas price on November 8, 2010 ($2.85 per gallon, reported by AAA) and the national unreserved monthly parking rate. This monthly savings is up 3.5 percent compared to last year. MOD CUT. Read the rules!
How Much Money Does Public Transportation Save? | TheCityFix.com

Last edited by linicx; 01-04-2011 at 03:21 PM.. Reason: Citation violation
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Old 12-31-2010, 03:23 AM
 
Location: Bryte, CA
1,963 posts, read 2,849,142 times
Reputation: 1321
$793 a month? What the hell are people doing?

I spend about $135-$150 a month for gas and insurance. For those months when I do a lot of driving I might reach $250.

Auto payment is another $120 a month.

People need to stop buying expensive vehicles with poor fuel economy and try walking to the corner store once in a while.
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Old 12-31-2010, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Granby, CT sometimes NH.
2,824 posts, read 2,969,733 times
Reputation: 2160
My wife used to ride the bus into work when we lived near a bus line. The cost for a monthly pass was about equal to the cost of a parking pass. She literally would put less than 50 miles a week on the car.

Where we live now does not have convenient bus service. It requires traveling 30 minutes out of the way for a total of 1 hr and 15 mins each way versus a 30 minute car ride. Now she is driving over 300 miles per week.

My job has never afforded the opportunity to use public transportation. We'd prefer to use it if it were available and most certainly would save money especially given the cost of maintaining and replacing vehicles that each amass 18 to 20k miles per year.

The primary reason for where we chose to live is the quality of schools for our children. When our kids finish school we will most likely relocate in a more urban location.
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Old 12-31-2010, 07:31 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,476 posts, read 6,203,114 times
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Using tranist saves me about $300-400 month between insurance, registration fees, gas and repairs. I had no car payment when I owned one.
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Old 12-31-2010, 08:57 AM
 
Location: North Metro Atlanta
4,906 posts, read 6,274,817 times
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Intersting that the study (Well not realy) uses the highest costs for cars, and lowest costs to the transit.
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Old 12-31-2010, 09:25 AM
 
43,416 posts, read 47,342,340 times
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I wander if they actally look at all public tranport and the total cost;not just to the user but to taxpayers. I know where I live the public tranport system doesn't even breal even with fares.
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Old 12-31-2010, 09:42 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,476 posts, read 6,203,114 times
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While you're wondering about that, wonder about the actual cost of fuel and highway once the subsidies are taken away.
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Old 12-31-2010, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Earth
1,480 posts, read 2,961,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
I wander if they actally look at all public tranport and the total cost;not just to the user but to taxpayers. I know where I live the public tranport system doesn't even breal even with fares.
You want to compare costs to tax payers? Construction, maintenance, and endless widening of roads... emergency response to auto-accidents... the subsidization of oil companies... and the user tax (or gas tax) does not come close to covering these costs. People who do not or cannot drive also pay the taxes that let us afford to drive our cars.

Plus, when households save on transportation they tend to spend that money in their local economy as opposed to sending their money to the middle east or wherever else. For further reading: The Green Dividend | Impresa, Inc.
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Old 12-31-2010, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Bryte, CA
1,963 posts, read 2,849,142 times
Reputation: 1321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastern Roamer View Post
You want to compare costs to tax payers? Construction, maintenance, and endless widening of roads... emergency response to auto-accidents... the subsidization of oil companies... and the user tax (or gas tax) does not come close to covering these costs. People who do not or cannot drive also pay the taxes that let us afford to drive our cars.
There is adequate funding after accounting for state and federal fuel taxes. Additionally, public transportation projects are paid for out of these taxes. The problem is politicians see the money generated from fuel taxes as a giant piggy bank.

Here is a previous post I made about the issue:

Two Californias

People who do not drive don't pay anything in most places. In some areas they pay, on average across the country, less than one half of one percent in sales taxes to assist in the development of roads AND public transportation projects because the state and federal governments can't manage the revenue they generate from fuel taxes. After they take a few rides these people have used more than what they have paid through their .5% contribution to the local transportation fund, if there is one where they live.

Show me where the oil companies are subsidized (where they receive money from federal expenditures), with the exception of the development of alternative fuels. Perhaps I missed something when searching for subsidized oil. At best, I disagree with many of their federal leases and how they are taxed for extraction within the US. But, they aren't receiving any money to sell oil cheaper.

I'm not against public transportation. In fact, I'm very much for it and I'm ok with it costing more than it generates in fares. What I have a problem with is people making up, or distorting facts thinking it is going to persuade people to take their position. The best example I can think of is the Republicans claim that the wealthy will spend more if they get big tax cuts and a ton of jobs will be created.

The idea is to acknowledge the problem (not enough people using transportation) and figure out why more people don't use it. There are a variety of reasons ranging from inconvenience, trips taking three times as long, having to sit next to obnoxious people, and more.
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Old 12-31-2010, 09:38 PM
 
7,611 posts, read 8,535,570 times
Reputation: 3141
Quote:
Originally Posted by KC6ZLV View Post

Show me where the oil companies are subsidized (where they receive money from federal expenditures), with the exception of the development of alternative fuels. Perhaps I missed something when searching for subsidized oil. At best, I disagree with many of their federal leases and how they are taxed for extraction within the US. But, they aren't receiving any money to sell oil cheaper.
Turn Off the Oil Subsidy Spigot

Obama Calls for End of Oil Subsidies in 2011 Budget

(obviously he didn't follow through with this)

Oil Subsidies - Oil companies have a rich history of U.S. subsidies - Los Angeles Times

Low-Grade Markets & Oil Subsidies

And if you include global oil production, government subsidy for oil production peaked in 2008 to over $500 billion a year--more than half a trillion! This year they are predicted to be a more reasonable $250 billion--assuming prices don't peak to 2008 levels again, although pundits are already warning they might.

Finance & Development, June 2010 - Oil Subsidies: Costly and Rising

These are all from the first page of results of a Google-search for "oil subsidy."
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