U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-27-2011, 04:18 PM
 
1,164 posts, read 1,792,262 times
Reputation: 801

Advertisements

I thought this was kind of funny. I looked up the densest cities in America on wiki for a different thread, but got a little bit confused because I didn't recognize any of the names. That's because they're almost all suburbs; places like Guttneberg, Union City, West New York, Hoboken, NJ; Maywood and Huntington Park, CA. Even the densest state is nothing but a huge suburb of New York and Philadelphia - New Jersey. Interesting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-27-2011, 04:34 PM
 
229 posts, read 248,367 times
Reputation: 251
those are not suburbs.... look at those tightly packed blocks in guttenberg and union city. There is nothing suburban about it plus most people live in apartments
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-27-2011, 05:56 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
Reputation: 14804
Big cities have a large area that often include non-residential parts such as airports, ports, industrial and commercial land. And sometimes city boundaries are drawn arbitrarily, with some dense places close to the center of the city not part of the city. For example, there parts New Jersey right on the other side of Hudson from Manhattan (only 3-4 miles away) that are built up similar to the denser parts of Brooklyn and Queens while Staten Island, a mostly borough (and a long train / drive to Manhattan) is part of NYC.

All of the places you listed are towns / cities that are close to the center city of the metro area and contain mostly multifamily residences and little non-residential sections. And they are the area of city neighborhoods. I could find a city neighborhood of similar size to those towns that are much denser. Here are a few examples:

LA metro:

Densest city: Maywood, CA (23k people /sq mile, 1.18 sq miles)
Largest city: Los Angeles, CA (8.2k people / sq mile, 469 sq miles)
Densest neighborhood in Los Angeles: Koreatown (43k people /sq mile, 2.7 sq miles)

NYC metro:

Densest city: Union City, NJ (53k people/ sq mile, 1.25 sq miles)
Largest city: New York City, NY ( 27.5k people / sq mile, 305 sq miles)
Densest neighborhood in NYC: Upper East Side (126k people /sq mile, 1.75 sq miles)

Boston metro:

Densest city: Sommerville, MA (18k people/ sq mile, 4.2 sq miles)
Largest city: Boston, MA ( 13.3k people / sq mile, 48 sq miles)
Densest neighborhood in Boston: Back Bay ? (28k people /sq mile, 1 sq miles)

I'm not completely sure if Back Bay is the densest neighborhood in Boston, but it's probably close. I didn't count the North End because it's tiny (1/3 square mile). Also, Los Angeles' density is a bit lower because there's a mountain range in its city limits. Anyhow my point is the only reason the places you listed are the densest is because of boundaries. If you could draw a 1 square mile in the densest place in these (and most) metro areas, you find it that it would lie in the large city very close to downtown, not in a "suburb".

Last edited by nei; 01-27-2011 at 06:38 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2011, 03:44 PM
 
1,164 posts, read 1,792,262 times
Reputation: 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by im_a_lawyer View Post
those are not suburbs.... look at those tightly packed blocks in guttenberg and union city. There is nothing suburban about it plus most people live in apartments
If a suburb isn't a community that developed outside of a major city's limits because of its proximity to that major city, what is a suburb? Perhaps New Jersey isn't the most suburban state?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2011, 04:19 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyev View Post
If a suburb isn't a community that developed outside of a major city's limits because of its proximity to that major city, what is a suburb? Perhaps New Jersey isn't the most suburban state?
As I said, city limits are weirdly drawn. Which feels more city to you?

west new york,nj - Google Maps

Mill Basin, New York, NY - Google Maps

The places in New Jersey you listed were built up around 1900, earlier than parts of NYC.

Last edited by nei; 01-28-2011 at 04:39 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2011, 04:32 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,890,268 times
Reputation: 18049
Its because they once were sub burb many cases. The sub burb have been aroud since shortly after WWII when they became popular with so mnay that had seen anther world larger than their hometwon. It reallty has not stopped since but the areas are much different. Cities often annnexed but now mnay sub burbs have become their own towns and incorporated.IMO ;mnay cities have annexed unitl they can't govern the area they control with mnay older areas being high depednent on new areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2011, 05:31 PM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,381 posts, read 23,366,772 times
Reputation: 4519
Those are cities and not suburbs..... Very dense cities at that....on the NJ part..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2011, 10:00 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,556,250 times
Reputation: 4048
Americans have been moving out of cities and into suburbs in huge numbers since the 1930s, and government advocated the emptying of central cities for about the same length of time. For the same length of time, the suburban model was the only allowable form of development aside from a token level of poorly-supported public housing (whose construction generally followed the destruction of housing in urban neighborhoods.) After 7-8 decades, it is any surprise that so many people are now in the suburbs?

Also, recall that not all suburbs are alike--those high-density, high-population suburbs are not the kind with multi-acre lots of single-family homes. Some suburbs have rows of multi-story townhomes, mid-rise apartments, and other high-density housing--back when a suburb was someplace you rode to on the streetcar.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2011, 05:58 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Americans have been moving out of cities and into suburbs in huge numbers since the 1930s, and government advocated the emptying of central cities for about the same length of time. For the same length of time, the suburban model was the only allowable form of development aside from a token level of poorly-supported public housing (whose construction generally followed the destruction of housing in urban neighborhoods.) After 7-8 decades, it is any surprise that so many people are now in the suburbs?

Also, recall that not all suburbs are alike--those high-density, high-population suburbs are not the kind with multi-acre lots of single-family homes. Some suburbs have rows of multi-story townhomes, mid-rise apartments, and other high-density housing--back when a suburb was someplace you rode to on the streetcar.
Most of the places in New Jersey listed peaked or are only slightly less than today's population than today' population in 1930.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2011, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Chicago
3,569 posts, read 6,017,186 times
Reputation: 2577
If a place is dense then it is urban... right?

So how can an urban place be SUB- urban if it is urban?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top