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Unread 02-12-2011, 05:06 PM
Status: "Snow on the blooming daffodil!" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
65,233 posts, read 51,495,674 times
Reputation: 17800
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
You'd be surprised. I grew up in a rural environment, learned how to farm and how to garden (vegetables, fruit, etc.) and now I live in the city. I actually know a number of others who grew up in a rural setting and know much of the same and they're urban dwellers today as well.
I would be surprised. For every example like yours, there are probably 100 who don't even know how to plant a seed. I've worked in "the city" as a visiting nurse. Some of my clients couldn't even make mac and cheese from a box; they had to buy it all prepared and open a jar and eat it cold. My own DH grew up in the city; his family never gardened or grew anything other than grass. He had to learn all that when we bought a house with a garden already put in by the previous owners.
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Unread 02-12-2011, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
22,753 posts, read 26,128,657 times
Reputation: 31962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You know, thinking about it, a lot of the suburbs of Chicago are also called cities, villages, etc.
That's not uncommon in Ohio, either, especially around Cleveland and Cincinnati.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
it makes it hard to have a dialogue with so many people with different definitions.
Agreed. And I'd absolutely qualify Cambridge and Somerville as suburbs of Boston (yes, I've been to both).
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Unread 02-12-2011, 05:23 PM
Status: "Can I pack away my winter coat now?" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
22,490 posts, read 9,659,078 times
Reputation: 6687
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Agreed. And I'd absolutely qualify Cambridge and Somerville as suburbs of Boston (yes, I've been to both).
Meh. I didn't feel that Cambridge and Somerville was much different from Boston (except of course Downtown Boston).
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Unread 02-12-2011, 05:25 PM
Status: "Make no little plans." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
2,918 posts, read 3,558,975 times
Reputation: 1645
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I would be surprised. For every example like yours, there are probably 100 who don't even know how to plant a seed. I've worked in "the city" as a visiting nurse. Some of my clients couldn't even make mac and cheese from a box; they had to buy it all prepared and open a jar and eat it cold. My own DH grew up in the city; his family never gardened or grew anything other than grass. He had to learn all that when we bought a house with a garden already put in by the previous owners.
Except for growing a Dixie-cup full of grass seeds in kindergarten, I never planted a single plant until I moved to the city. Of course, most of what I choose to plant aren't fruits or vegetables, (with the exception of a blackberry bush) but I feel confident I could grow them if I wanted.

Here are some pictures of my landscaping: (this probably isn't necessary, and maybe I'm showing-off a little, but some might like to see pictures from summer )

Backyard:



Front yard:


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Unread 02-12-2011, 05:32 PM
Status: "Make no little plans." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
2,918 posts, read 3,558,975 times
Reputation: 1645
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
That's not uncommon in Ohio, either, especially around Cleveland and Cincinnati.

Agreed. And I'd absolutely qualify Cambridge and Somerville as suburbs of Boston (yes, I've been to both).
IMO, when most posters say "suburb" or "suburban," they are referring to form, and not that area's geography. For me, "suburban" is like that supreme court judge's definition of pornography: "I know it when I see it." And, it never has anything to do with whether an area is legally recognized as a city, town, village, borough, township, or whatever.
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Unread 02-12-2011, 06:16 PM
Status: "Can I pack away my winter coat now?" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
22,490 posts, read 9,659,078 times
Reputation: 6687
I live in a "city" and there is farmland less than one mile from me.
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Unread 02-13-2011, 08:37 AM
Status: "Snow on the blooming daffodil!" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
65,233 posts, read 51,495,674 times
Reputation: 17800
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
IMO, when most posters say "suburb" or "suburban," they are referring to form, and not that area's geography. For me, "suburban" is like that supreme court judge's definition of pornography: "I know it when I see it." And, it never has anything to do with whether an area is legally recognized as a city, town, village, borough, township, or whatever.
Now I feel like I'm on the set of "Groundhog Day". We've gone round about this before, and still are going on about it on some threads on this forum.

I disagreed with the porn definition (which seems to have gotten much looser since that statement was made), and I disagree with this definition of a suburb. Just because an area is new, or G*d forbid has attached garages, or some street layout other than a strict grid, that does not make it a "suburb".

Many people on this forum seem to think that "suburb" means and endless sea of new homes on large lots with attached garages on winding streets with no services available for miles around. In fact, I have lived outside large cities almost my entire life, and I've never lived in a place like that.

ETA: I do like your landscaping.

Last edited by Katiana; 02-13-2011 at 08:59 AM..
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Unread 02-13-2011, 09:04 AM
Status: "Can I pack away my winter coat now?" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
22,490 posts, read 9,659,078 times
Reputation: 6687
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Now I feel like I'm on the set of "Groundhog Day". We've gone round about this before, and still are going on about it on some threads on this forum.

I disagreed with the porn definition (which seems to have gotten much looser since that statement was made), and I disagree with this definition of a suburb. Just because an area is new, or G*d forbid has attached garages, or some street layout other than a strict grid, that does not make it a "suburb".
Yes, let's agree to disagree. I disagree with your definition and so do some of the other posters on the forum. You're not convincing me, and I don't think I can convince you. I don't see why city limits matter in defining urban or suburban. There's a thread a while back on what does suburb, rural and urban look like to you. That should give you an idea what we mean. And I chose Cambridge, a city another poster described as a suburb for example of an "urban" neighborhood.

Quote:
Many people on this forum seem to think that "suburb" means and endless sea of new homes on large lots with attached garages on winding streets with no services available for miles around. In fact, I have lived outside large cities almost my entire life, and I've never lived in a place like that.

ETA: I do like your landscaping.
No, a lot of posts have discussed different types of suburbs (new vs. old, streetcar vs auto-centric, etc.)
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Unread 02-13-2011, 09:12 AM
Status: "Snow on the blooming daffodil!" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
65,233 posts, read 51,495,674 times
Reputation: 17800
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Yes, let's agree to disagree. I disagree with your definition and so do some of the other posters on the forum. You're not convincing me, and I don't think I can convince you. I don't see why city limits matter in defining urban or suburban. There's a thread a while back on what does suburb, rural and urban look like to you. That should give you an idea what we mean. And I chose Cambridge, a city another poster described as a suburb for example of an "urban" neighborhood.

No, a lot of posts have discussed different types of suburbs (new vs. old, streetcar vs auto-centric, etc.)
Who's this "we", Kemosabe? Seriously, I hate it when people say that on this forum (not just Urban Planning, all of them). It feels like a group has decided on what is "The Holy Grail", and then seeks to browbeat the few who disagree. Shouldn't we all speak for ourselves? Some other posters have said that Cambridge is definitely a suburb. Since you say most NEers don't know much about Denver (no surprise to me; you guys seem to think we're up to our hips in snow 10 months a year), without looking it up, what is your opinion about Wheat Ridge, Colorado?

Re: your last sentence, it always comes back to "suburbs are this, suburbs are that, people drive 10 miles in an SUV to buy a carton of milk in the suburbs, suburban kids all do drugs", etc.
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Unread 02-13-2011, 09:12 AM
Status: "Make no little plans." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
2,918 posts, read 3,558,975 times
Reputation: 1645
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Now I feel like I'm on the set of "Groundhog Day". We've gone round about this before, and still are going on about it on some threads on this forum.

I disagreed with the porn definition (which seems to have gotten much looser since that statement was made), and I disagree with this definition of a suburb. Just because an area is new, or G*d forbid has attached garages, or some street layout other than a strict grid, that does not make it a "suburb".

Many people on this forum seem to think that "suburb" means and endless sea of new homes on large lots with attached garages on winding streets with no services available for miles around. In fact, I have lived outside large cities almost my entire life, and I've never lived in a place like that.

ETA: I do like your landscaping.
Thanks!

My thoughts are like nei's regarding the rest of your post.
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