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Old 02-10-2011, 01:39 AM
 
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Manhattan is known to have mostly mixed use buildings all over with first floor retail. I know Washington D.C. has changed zoning in most places and is building mixed use buildings with first floor retail as far as the eye can see. As cities grow and mixed use buildings are most popular, what cities are building mixed use buildings with first floor retail all over their city with the goal of encompassing all of the city limits with mixed use highrise/lowrise buildings?
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Old 02-10-2011, 08:37 AM
 
Location: The City
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Philly is lucky in that much of the development was always this way, sans the concrete crap built in the 60's, 70's, and 80's

Last edited by kidphilly; 02-10-2011 at 09:27 AM..
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Old 02-10-2011, 09:20 AM
 
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The last part of your question strikes me the wrong way. Many cities are embracing the idea of mixed-use buildings, but so far as I know no cities are planning on encompassing their entire city limits with mixed-use buildings, and the exclusive replacement of the existing building stock.

Where I live, a lot of central city projects (and some in targeted "transit villages" and other selected areas outside the central city) are based on this sort of ground floor retail, residential above model. It used to be very common in this city, and pretty much all American cities, until the early to middle 20th century, and redevelopment destroyed much of it. Now we're realizing it wasn't such a bad idea in the first place.
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Old 02-10-2011, 09:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Philly is lucky in that much of the development was always this way, sans the concrete crap built in the 60's, 70's, and 80's
When visiting philly, always notice the lack of buildings in the neighborhoods. It just looks like row houses in most neighborhoods. Im talking outside of areas near downtown. Places far from downtown.
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Old 02-10-2011, 09:47 AM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
When visiting philly, always notice the lack of buildings in the neighborhoods. It just looks like row houses in most neighborhoods. Im talking outside of areas near downtown. Places far from downtown.

like this

Village at Valley Forge (http://www.mypinwheel.com/accounts/pw_05132001/links/index2.html - broken link)

or this

Master Plan - Philadelphia Navy Yard

or this

About the Piazza

or this
Master plan for Phila. waterfront development nearing | Philadelphia Business Journal



many neighborhoods also have mixed use development intertwined with the rowhouses but there is also new urbanist development
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Old 02-10-2011, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Montco PA
2,053 posts, read 4,170,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
like this

Village at Valley Forge (http://www.mypinwheel.com/accounts/pw_05132001/links/index2.html - broken link)

or this

Master Plan - Philadelphia Navy Yard

or this

About the Piazza

or this
Master plan for Phila. waterfront development nearing | Philadelphia Business Journal



many neighborhoods also have mixed use development intertwined with the rowhouses but there is also new urbanist development
Not as much as there should be. Many Philadelphia neighborhoods are full of NIMBY losers who feel that "tall" buildings have no place in their communities.
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Old 02-10-2011, 04:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Manhattan is known to have mostly mixed use buildings all over with first floor retail. I know Washington D.C. has changed zoning in most places and is building mixed use buildings with first floor retail as far as the eye can see. As cities grow and mixed use buildings are most popular, what cities are building mixed use buildings with first floor retail all over their city with the goal of encompassing all of the city limits with mixed use highrise/lowrise buildings?
Houston. Because there is no zoning, lowrises, midrises - even high rises - can be built wherever. And they don't have to wait a few years for some politician to change the zoning ordinances. Dozens of residential low and midrises, some with retail on the lower levels, some not, have sprung up in several neighborhoods.

BTW, the city isn't building these buildings. Developers are. Cities usually only build arenas, parks, libraries, and other civic things like that. Some cities have dipped into non-civic building, like Chicago, New York, Detroit and Pittsburgh - usually with disastrous results. Now those non-civic buildings are mostly torn down...
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Old 02-10-2011, 07:53 PM
 
Location: The City
22,341 posts, read 32,197,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
When visiting philly, always notice the lack of buildings in the neighborhoods. It just looks like row houses in most neighborhoods. Im talking outside of areas near downtown. Places far from downtown.

Just to be clear are you suggesting every neighborhood in DC will be canvased with mixed use everywhere, seems to me there is street after street of rowhomes in DC too, are these all being torn down for this new urban utopia. DC and the metro do a good job with urban development but is this what you are suggesting?
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Old 02-11-2011, 02:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Just to be clear are you suggesting every neighborhood in DC will be canvased with mixed use everywhere, seems to me there is street after street of rowhomes in DC too, are these all being torn down for this new urban utopia. DC and the metro do a good job with urban development but is this what you are suggesting?
It's happening as we speak. Nice row homes are staying in Georgetown and capital hill but many other places they aren't. Vacant or crumbling row homes are being demolished for 4-12 floor mixuse buildings. The owners are being bought out all over the city. Industrial area's, parking lots etc. are all being redevlopded. I don't know the last time you visited D.C. or if you follow plans for the city, but it will be a short Manhattan at street level in 2020. I guarantee you that. Low rise and high rise buildings are going up everywhere that used to be row homes or industrial area's. Some of these were businesses, others where residencies, but all of them are being demolished. Most of NW east of Rock Creek Park, all of SW, most of SE especially near the water on both sides of the river, and many area's in NE. When the streetcars are done, look for every area in a 1/2 mile radius to change zoning adding lowrises and highrises also.

Last edited by MDAllstar; 02-11-2011 at 02:29 PM..
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Old 02-11-2011, 02:41 PM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,948,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Manhattan is known to have mostly mixed use buildings all over with first floor retail. I know Washington D.C. has changed zoning in most places and is building mixed use buildings with first floor retail as far as the eye can see. As cities grow and mixed use buildings are most popular, what cities are building mixed use buildings with first floor retail all over their city with the goal of encompassing all of the city limits with mixed use highrise/lowrise buildings?
Seattle's building a lot of midrise residential buildings in the inner city. It's a great town for it because it's a small area sandwiched between two bodies of water. Such a concentration makes it feel very urban. Lots of cities are building these types of buildings, but they're very spread out so they don't have the same feel.
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