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Old 02-22-2011, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 4,058,698 times
Reputation: 1394
Wink The Still Elusive "Return to the City"

Metropolitan area results are beginning to trickle in from the 2010 census. They reveal that, at least for the major metropolitan areas so far, there is little evidence to support the often repeated claim by think tanks and the media that people are moving from suburbs to the historical core municipalities. This was effectively brought to light in a detailed analysis of Chicago metropolitan area results by New Geography’s Aaron Renn. This article analyzes data available for the eight metropolitan areas with more than 1 million population for which data had been released by February 20.

The Still Elusive "Return to the City" | Newgeography.com

It's just a dream from urban planners.Suburbs powaaaaaaaaaaa
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Old 02-22-2011, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
11,254 posts, read 9,608,457 times
Reputation: 10241
Jack up gas prices north of 8 bucks a gallon and you just might get your exodus.
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Old 02-22-2011, 01:54 PM
 
Location: The City
19,060 posts, read 15,829,987 times
Reputation: 5585
I think when looking at cities that core versus non-core city should be taken into consideration. I know for Philly and would imagine for Chicago as well in my time there, there has been a rebirth or growth in the CORE and the peripheral areas are still in decline, is is an inside out movement it seems so in agregate the bleeding has not stopped completely
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Old 02-22-2011, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
27,026 posts, read 13,435,154 times
Reputation: 8581
What other large non-sunbelt cities do we have data for besides Chicago? Newark and Jersey City posted very small increases, but they're not large.
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Old 02-22-2011, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
875 posts, read 836,216 times
Reputation: 593
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
I think when looking at cities that core versus non-core city should be taken into consideration. I know for Philly and would imagine for Chicago as well in my time there, there has been a rebirth or growth in the CORE and the peripheral areas are still in decline, is is an inside out movement it seems so in agregate the bleeding has not stopped completely
This.

I haven't gotten to know Philadelphia *well* until moving here. But we used to drive into Center City all the time.

I don't know if it's just me older now - but when I was a kid I remember thinking Center City was nice. It seems trendier than I remember from childhood. But maybe I just wasn't aware of it.

What I do know is the areas around Center City Philadelphia are greatly improved from back then. When I moved to Philadelphia, my father warned me about all of these places to avoid - and they're all pretty nice places these days. He couldn't even believe it when he saw it.

I'm excited for possible growth in Philly, but if it doesn't happen, it doesn't happen. Philadelphia, as well as all other large cities, may be unsustainbly large anyway.

I think what you are going to see is a continue improvement emanating from the core of cities. If population continue to decline, then it does. For us proponents of the city, it's one piece of data we don't get to use.

The main thing that proponents of the city care about is making cities nicer place. Particularly the old urban cores, which are historically, what we believe, the best way to organize our living (in addition to towns which are strictly towns, and rural areas which are strictly rural). The fact that improvement is happening in these parts - at least in Philadelphia and Baltimore - is what we want anyway. If other people want to live in the suburbs until the gas is gone, that's their decision. We just want nice cities to live in, and we're finally getting them, after a long period of decline.
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Old 02-22-2011, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,847 posts, read 2,655,643 times
Reputation: 1543
You would have to be blind not to see that there is a larger back to the city movement than in the past. Just about any large city in the country has seen an influx of housing and gentrification into it's downtown and core neighborhoods.

And using Chicago as an example is nonsense and shows why arguing with statistics can be misleading. The fact is that the truly urban parts of Chicago have gained population over the last decade. Why? Because those neighborhoods attract people who desire an urban lifestyle. The parts of the city that are losing population are the further out neighborhoods which function more like suburbs (i.e. auto-centric). Those further out neighborhoods are not attractive to those wanting an urban lifestyle, nor are they are attractive to those raising a family (crap schools and often dangerous). Thus you still have large swaths of Chicago losing population; however, that does not take away from the fact that many are moving into the good parts of the city for the amenities of urban living.
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Old 02-22-2011, 04:11 PM
 
371 posts, read 100,844 times
Reputation: 185
Here's an old article. The Wall Street Journal felt that the minor growth in city cores was a blip, and it will likely end as the economy stabilizes.
Suburb Population Growth Slows - Real Time Economics - WSJ

But in this article 39 or 52 cities saw more growth in the suburbs than in the cities.
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Old 02-22-2011, 05:51 PM
Status: "Happy Halloween!" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,179 posts, read 58,353,146 times
Reputation: 19713
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chango View Post
Jack up gas prices north of 8 bucks a gallon and you just might get your exodus.
I love how people are just pining for the day when all of us suburbanites will be SOL b/c of gas prices. I drive 4 1/2 miles to work. The rise in gas prices won't affect me too much. Many people live and work in the burbs. It sure wouldn't do me much good to move 25 miles (or more) to Denver and reverse commute.

Quote:
Originally Posted by randy8876 View Post
Here's an old article. The Wall Street Journal felt that the minor growth in city cores was a blip, and it will likely end as the economy stabilizes.
Suburb Population Growth Slows - Real Time Economics - WSJ

But in this article 39 or 52 cities saw more growth in the suburbs than in the cities.
I like how they lump Aurora's population in with Denver's to get the city pop. Parts of Aurora are suburban by any definition, and none of Aurora could be called high-density urban.
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Old 02-22-2011, 05:59 PM
 
1,146 posts, read 1,087,191 times
Reputation: 704
There's something off about this article. The historical core of Houston, which is maybe 5 square miles, is not denser than New York. It's not even close. But according to this data, there are 400,000 people per square mile.
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Old 02-22-2011, 06:19 PM
 
41,657 posts, read 44,962,926 times
Reputation: 12798
IMO;its like most urban devlop in about every city. They are investors who got sweet heart deals plus federal urban devolpment block grants trying to sell this.Citties hav sepnt untold money paying for urban developemnt studies for deacdes now. If they is federal funds their are devlopers who will go for it.
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