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Old 03-10-2011, 09:05 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,891,130 times
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I have seen many threads lately mentioning the problems in suburbia. Well, there were always problems in each type of area as time moved on.

Looking back at rural, people were far away from jobs and not making much other than the basic means of living.

From there, urban or the downtown area in cities was developed. Among problems with urban was the pollution, traffic, and high rise of deaths from crime and traffic accidents.

From there, the suburbs and suburban parts of cities were created. To allow people to work in the city, but live outside of it's problems.

Now, we are in a time where the suburbs and suburban areas are causing traffic, smog, and a lack of sense of community as every one lives in boxes and shops at boxes.

Now, we are all trying to fix the suburban parts and urban parts and rural parts.

I agree the biggest problem with urban and suburban is draining natural resources at a fast pace and the fact both have traffic problems. More massive transit and bus system and "lifestyle center or plaza shopping centers" are fixing the problems in suburbia. Urban parts are attracting the younger crowd and redeveloping run down areas into new high density apartments, places for cafes, and offices.
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Old 03-11-2011, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
187 posts, read 479,674 times
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There is no perfect form of development. People just need to be happy that variety exists. You have a ton of different choices when choosing where to live. I don't think anyone would enjoy living in the "city" or "downtown" if they were forced to live there. Just because you live in a tall building or next to an arts center or coffee shop doesn't make you better than someone who lives a couple miles away and prefers to drive their car to work. People choose to live wherever they live because that's their preference. Personally, I would rather have my own house and a backyard to grow fruits and stuff in while still being able to get in my car and be wherever I need to be within 15 minutes. I could care less about public transit or "urbanity".
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Old 03-13-2011, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,121,705 times
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I have lived in all three types of areas, and certainly, they each have their pros and cons. But I am 26 years old and prefer in order as follows: (1) suburban, (2) rural, (3) urban. I can be happy in any of these, but I have found life to be more comfortable in a suburban/rural area. I don't usually care about arts, entertainment, culture, diversity, restaurants or bars and clubs, since I am a homebody by default. And on the occasion that I do care about these things, I simply get in my car and drive there. I don't think its worth giving up peace, quiet and privacy that is offered by suburban or rural living. I'm glad I had the experience of living in NYC while I was 22-23 years old. It truly made me appreciate suburban living much more than ever. Now I live in a small city, however and feel slightly overwhelmed. I'm hoping to move to a less dense area by year's end.
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Old 03-13-2011, 11:24 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,891,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I have lived in all three types of areas, and certainly, they each have their pros and cons. But I am 26 years old and prefer in order as follows: (1) suburban, (2) rural, (3) urban. I can be happy in any of these, but I have found life to be more comfortable in a suburban/rural area. I don't usually care about arts, entertainment, culture, diversity, restaurants or bars and clubs, since I am a homebody by default. And on the occasion that I do care about these things, I simply get in my car and drive there. I don't think its worth giving up peace, quiet and privacy that is offered by suburban or rural living. I'm glad I had the experience of living in NYC while I was 22-23 years old. It truly made me appreciate suburban living much more than ever. Now I live in a small city, however and feel slightly overwhelmed. I'm hoping to move to a less dense area by year's end.
I can only stand suburban if there is a mall nearby. And what about living in a suburban area with a lack of shopping centers? Or what about a college town downtown urban area?
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Old 03-14-2011, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,121,705 times
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Originally Posted by the city View Post
I can only stand suburban if there is a mall nearby. And what about living in a suburban area with a lack of shopping centers? Or what about a college town downtown urban area?
I hate college towns with a passion. I am so sick of seeing college kids walking around town and in the stores, buying beer and crap. It makes the city feel more childish than it should be.
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Old 03-14-2011, 07:24 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,101,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I hate college towns with a passion. I am so sick of seeing college kids walking around town and in the stores, buying beer and crap. It makes the city feel more childish than it should be.
I know what you're saying. I gotta say though, a lot of college towns in the midwest appeared to be much nicer than in the east. Columbia, Missouri and Lawrence Kansas were favorites of mine when traveling. Certainly more of a balance between the college and those who actually live in the town than places like Oneonta or some of those other SUNY towns.

... edited to add Newark DE. Ugh, horrendous.
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Old 03-14-2011, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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I love to buy beer and crap ...
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Old 03-14-2011, 11:56 AM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,891,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I hate college towns with a passion. I am so sick of seeing college kids walking around town and in the stores, buying beer and crap. It makes the city feel more childish than it should be.
And yet California has 8 well-known college towns-Berkeley, Santa Cruz, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Palo Alto, Chico, Davis, and Isla Vista. The true college towns have alot of natural food markets, many bars in downtown, eateries, and plenty of college aged clothing stores.

But yes I agree I would prefer being away from the college town. It has only caused me heart ache. But yet there is no other place to hang out in my area, so I have to go there. If we had a mall in my area that would change things.

*sigh* Most people prefer college towns over suburban cities.

It's almost like college towns are the opposites of suburban cities:
-anti-sprawl (no shopping centers) or controlled sprawl
-high density suburban homes
-downtowns with taller buildings, tall apartments, good public transportation, bars, eateries, college-aged clothing stores, book stores, coffee shops, art galleries, and playhouses
-large amount of college educated and college students
-an abundance of natural food markets (Whole Foods, Trader Joes, local ones)
-possibly a Costco or at least nearby
-fraternity and sorority rows
-more 24 hr joints

And your typical suburban city:
-usually a mall or lifestyle center (plaza)
-sprawled out with big box shopping centers
-bigger suburban homes
-traditional downtown with some coffee shops and art galleries and playhouses
-places close earlier
-less natural food markets
-more open-space

Last edited by the city; 03-14-2011 at 12:58 PM..
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Old 03-15-2011, 03:06 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,799 posts, read 10,711,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I love to buy beer and crap ...
I would suggest a nice India pale ale as a good match for crap. Or you could go the other way and try a stout with crap.
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Old 03-17-2011, 06:48 PM
 
1,164 posts, read 1,792,749 times
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The best place to live is a small town on the cusp of a big city before it becomes an exurb. But that usually only lasts a decade or so. Where I grew up has always been peaceful and quiet with virtually no traffic. Sprawl keeps coming closer, so now it's really nice because there are actual stores within 20 minutes (Costco, Target, and even a mall). And jobs too. But I bet by 2025 it'll just be another noisy, loud, clogged exurb.
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