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Old 03-20-2011, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Far from where I'd like to be
24,332 posts, read 28,800,579 times
Reputation: 35028
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
when given a choice of places to eat or shop, my Boomer/Silent age parents tend to prefer a chain restaurant or store (ooh, there's a Denny's!) whereas my GenX and Millenial friends tend to prefer independently owned one-off places (ooh, there's a dive bar!)
That's your parents, not a whole generation. And I see plenty of younger people at Friday's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Einstein View Post
and we're an extremely educated generation
Of course you are, Einstein.

Quote:
Originally Posted by le roi View Post
Because the assumption here is that we don't know already, right?
Based on many of the posts on this thread, and others, no, you don't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Einstein View Post
Are you willing to argue previous generations as a whole before us weren't racist?
As a whole? For real?

What was I saying about that black and white thing ... I can't remember ... golly, I must be getting senile ...

 
Old 03-20-2011, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Norwalk, CT
5,449 posts, read 4,129,414 times
Reputation: 3025
This article is nonsense. I lived in NYC and found everyday life to be unreasonably uncomfortable. After a year and a half of true urban living, I was clamoring to be back in the suburbs. It's tiring to walk around everywhere. I'd much rather have a car to go places. Not to mention, walking in the windy, cold streets is NOT fun. The article is true, however, that I don't care to have a large house. Something modest would do fine, but I would like to have plenty of yard space for privacy and doing things outside.
 
Old 03-20-2011, 06:02 PM
Status: "Corn well over knee high!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
67,495 posts, read 55,265,574 times
Reputation: 18808
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Whoa, yeah that's totally the same thing as white flight and forced integration. Try again.
It's racism, brought to us by "your" generation, you know, these highly educated people who know virtually everything there is to know and be known in the world.

Last edited by Katiana; 03-20-2011 at 06:12 PM..
 
Old 03-20-2011, 06:04 PM
Status: "Corn well over knee high!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
67,495 posts, read 55,265,574 times
Reputation: 18808
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Personal preference and taste makes a certain sense--when given a choice of places to eat or shop, my Boomer/Silent age parents tend to prefer a chain restaurant or store (ooh, there's a Denny's!) whereas my GenX and Millenial friends tend to prefer independently owned one-off places (ooh, there's a dive bar!) And yes, that's not a universal, and yes, it has more to do with individual preferences. But that's the whole point here--I get the sense that Boomers feel threatened by opinions that don't confirm their own.

And I suppose I'll get over the assumption that the transfer of power will probably go directly from the Boomers to the Millenials, while we GenXers quietly do stuff and hang out at the (local, independent) coffee shop.
DH and I, both "older" Boomers, have long preferred indy places, even when traveling. DH's brother, also in our age group, prefers chains when traveling b/c "you know what you're getting".

I sure as heck see a lot of Gen X, Gen Y types at the Starbuck's around here, not to mention that a lot of them work there.

In both my hometown and his, chains weren't prevalent in the 50s/60s when we were growing up. "Threatened" my ***!
 
Old 03-20-2011, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Chicago
1,867 posts, read 1,817,473 times
Reputation: 2191
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Around here, the willingness of millenials to move to/stay in the city is partially because our generation tends not to see people unlike us as a threat.
Yeah, that's why everyone my age (26) is making a revolutionary move to cosmopolitan Austin or Portland. "People unlike us," as in "people with different a color iPod."

People have been living around "people unlike them" (I'll use it as I assume you mean it: people of a different race) for a very long time now. Young professionals lived in New York before Sex and the City, you know. They lived with the constant threat of getting mugged and they co-existed with lots of different kinds of people, many of whom no doubt tested their comfort zone, but they did it because they wanted to be in New York. And you want our generation to pat itself on the back why?
 
Old 03-20-2011, 06:40 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,476 posts, read 5,404,345 times
Reputation: 2940
Quote:
Originally Posted by tribecavsbrowns View Post
And you want our generation to pat itself on the back why?
Please identify any sort of prideful remark I made about it.
 
Old 03-20-2011, 07:05 PM
Status: "Corn well over knee high!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
67,495 posts, read 55,265,574 times
Reputation: 18808
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Please identify any sort of prideful remark I made about it.
Back to the source:

Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Around here, the willingness of millenials to move to/stay in the city is partially because our generation tends not to see people unlike us as a threat.
Your generation? The same ones who do stuff like this:

Alvaro Huerta: Racism on Campus

Here's one in Baltimore:

JHU Fraternity Called Racist After Halloween Party - Baltimore News Story - WBAL Baltimore (http://www.wbaltv.com/r/10194299/detail.html - broken link)
 
Old 03-20-2011, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Chicago
1,867 posts, read 1,817,473 times
Reputation: 2191
"Our generation tends not to see people unlike us as a threat."

On a closer reading, it was maybe presumptuous of me to read this as prideful, but even as a pure factual statement, I have big problems with it. It's very simplistic and ignores the fact that so many people who lived in far more diverse areas in the 70s and 80s still ended up in the suburbs. I just bristle at the implication that we're going to be any different because of that. Now, will the suburbs die off because of changes in energy and stuff like that, yeah, I think they might...

There's also the little issue of technology with our generation. Perhaps we don't "see people unlike us as a threat" because we don't see ANYONE as a threat, perhaps because we don't DO ANYTHING outside of our school/work social group because we're on the internet all the time. That's a bit harsh on our generation and I'm rambling, but you get the idea. Saying we love the cities because we're down with the brown is pretty laughably simplistic.
 
Old 03-20-2011, 07:16 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,476 posts, read 5,404,345 times
Reputation: 2940
I guess next time I'll just write a term paper about it. Of course I didn't mean it is an absolution. Jesus.
 
Old 03-20-2011, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Toledo, OH
668 posts, read 686,455 times
Reputation: 529
Quote:
Originally Posted by KC6ZLV View Post
The economic crash had nothing to do with valuing home ownership. The problem is they didn't look at a house as a home. They looked at a house as an investment. A home is a place to live in. A secure place. A place you could pay off in 15 to 30 years. You bought a house and paid it off because it secured retirement. That is what people did prior to about 2000. Give it some time. Gen Y will be looking for houses. Gen Y is still young. Most people don't think about buying a house until they get married, or in the case of my generation (Gen X) which was the first to have any real amount of single people buying houses, I expect Gen Y to start looking at buying a house in their early 30s, although I think they will be searching for smaller houses.
I agree with this. I believe im Gen Y? (24?) and I personally have no use for a huge home. I admit that I dont know how my priorities might change as I have children and get older, but I have no intentions of having anymore than 2, tops, in which case I doubt ill need a large home. Im against wasting space like that. Ideally, I just want a medium sized, older home, big on character, in a walkable neighborhood with as many amenities as possible nearby. I want a small yard in back as well but could do with out. I cant afford that house though at this time and im completely fine with that. Im most likely going to be buying a rather boring, small, 2 bedroom home, in a relatively inner city neighborhood (not ghetto, yet at least), because its affordable. Even if I could get a big enough loan to buy a typical McMansion-esque home or even a more modest suburban home in the same style....I wouldnt care to. Ill use the money that im not spending on a ridiculous McMansion to pay for private school for my kids in the future, if the public schools arent up to par for me.

I think plenty of Gen Y people will still be flocking to the burbs though. Thats definitely not a dying trend in my opinion. But I know for sure, the amount of people trying to be in the city, is on the rise, I being one of them.
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