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Old 03-19-2011, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
135 posts, read 209,753 times
Reputation: 89

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No McMansions for Millennials - Yahoo! Real Estate

 
Old 03-19-2011, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,602 posts, read 98,048,506 times
Reputation: 31048
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Einstein View Post
Neither did mine, supposedly. I'm an older Boomer.
 
Old 03-19-2011, 08:37 AM
 
48,521 posts, read 80,400,774 times
Reputation: 17954
So don't move there;simple answer. But i see alot fo them moving in really.
 
Old 03-19-2011, 09:18 AM
 
8,322 posts, read 13,962,854 times
Reputation: 4008
Neither does mine!

Settle Down Now: Is community the new frontier for Generation X? |
 
Old 03-19-2011, 10:42 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 10,656,965 times
Reputation: 3092
Around here, the willingness of millenials to move to/stay in the city is partially because our generation tends not to see people unlike us as a threat.
 
Old 03-19-2011, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,602 posts, read 98,048,506 times
Reputation: 31048
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Around here, the willingness of millenials to move to/stay in the city is partially because our generation tends not to see people unlike us as a threat.
Please get over yourselves. I'm fed up with these "moral superiority" arguments for things that are actually personal preference.
 
Old 03-19-2011, 11:52 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 10,656,965 times
Reputation: 3092
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Please get over yourselves. I'm fed up with these "moral superiority" arguments for things that are actually personal preference.
Katiana, you can just get over yourself and not take everything as a personal attack against you, the suburbs or your (excessively entitled) generation. Lots of young people who are now buying homes here (in Baltimore, which remember, is much different from Denver) come from parents who fled the city for the burbs after race riots, blockbusting, red lining, the collapse of industry, etc. Why? We don't want to drive everywhere (yes, I know you have very easy commutes in your suburb), we want access to transit (yes, I know RTD runs in your suburb), we appreciate the architecture (yes, I know your 30-year-old Pulte home is fantastic) and we have a vested interest in revitalizing a place that was once left for dead.

Remember I was describing what it is like "here," and not whatever suburb of Denver where you live. Which is much different from where I live or any suburbs surrounding this city. The realtionship between suburbs and city in Denver is pretty symbiotic, whereas in Baltimore and a few other places back east, it can be parasitic. Most suburbs here have poor access to transit, fewer minorities, much higher home values, and not much in the way of entertainment. There are people who like it for all these reasons and great ,they can live there.

Remember, us 22-30 year olds aren't exactly in a great job market. So when we want to buy, and the cost is half as much in the city as it is in the safe, free-of-minorities suburbs, what do you think is going to happen? And again - this is different from the way it is in Denver. I know that. Remember, please, just one thing: Cities are different from one another.

I welcome you to take your blinders off and realize that people on here describe their own situations and not your own.
 
Old 03-19-2011, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,043 posts, read 56,785,625 times
Reputation: 51737
Ah, yes. I remember those golden days when my contemporaries and I were going to save the world, too.



"McMansions" and suburbs do not necessarily go hand in hand. Y'all will soon learn that the world is not black and white. Good luck to you.
 
Old 03-19-2011, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,602 posts, read 98,048,506 times
Reputation: 31048
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Katiana, you can just get over yourself and not take everything as a personal attack against you, the suburbs or your (excessively entitled) generation. Lots of young people who are now buying homes here (in Baltimore, which remember, is much different from Denver) come from parents who fled the city for the burbs after race riots, blockbusting, red lining, the collapse of industry, etc. Why? We don't want to drive everywhere (yes, I know you have very easy commutes in your suburb), we want access to transit (yes, I know RTD runs in your suburb), we appreciate the architecture (yes, I know your 30-year-old Pulte home is fantastic) and we have a vested interest in revitalizing a place that was once left for dead.

Remember I was describing what it is like "here," and not whatever suburb of Denver where you live. Which is much different from where I live or any suburbs surrounding this city. The realtionship between suburbs and city in Denver is pretty symbiotic, whereas in Baltimore and a few other places back east, it can be parasitic. Most suburbs here have poor access to transit, fewer minorities, much higher home values, and not much in the way of entertainment. There are people who like it for all these reasons and great ,they can live there.

Remember, us 22-30 year olds aren't exactly in a great job market. So when we want to buy, and the cost is half as much in the city as it is in the safe, free-of-minorities suburbs, what do you think is going to happen? And again - this is different from the way it is in Denver. I know that. Remember, please, just one thing: Cities are different from one another.

I welcome you to take your blinders off and realize that people on here describe their own situations and not your own.
Why has it become a stock response on CD to say, "don't take it personally"? Is that an attempt to trivialize the conversation? I think the younger generation should get over this idea that they "discovered" tolerance, racial harmony, and the like. I don't believe I said anything that could be considered "defensive". Nor did I mention transportation, entertainment, commuting or Pulte homes. The idea that living in "the city" is a mark of moral superiority is very repugnant to me.

OTOH, you are complaining about the job market, etc. You might sit down and talk with your parents and find out what the job market was like when they entered it. Very few people had it easy.

I don't live in a Pulte home, and why is that an object of derision anyway? Do you think all those rowhouses in Baltimore were hand built individually when they all look alike?
 
Old 03-19-2011, 01:20 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,632 posts, read 16,824,863 times
Reputation: 29366
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Ah, yes. I remember those golden days when my contemporaries and I were going to save the world, too.



"McMansions" and suburbs do not necessarily go hand in hand. Y'all will soon learn that the world is not black and white. Good luck to you.
Well, we almost saved it, didn't we? If some fanatics hadn't taken things to the extreme whereupon it became ridiculous and harmful we could have succeeded.

To Gen Y--most of us struggled too and didn't have it easy. Our parents moved us to the suburbs to get away from crime. That's not so say that the suburbs were that great either but at least when I was 7 years old I wasn't getting jumped on the way home from school like I was in the city.

I'm glad that people want to move to cities again and to get things cleaned up and made safe. It's just that for most of my life, cities were scary places to go. I admire the beautiful architecture of the buildings in so many cities here in the northeast and I always get sad to see it all in a deteriorating condition. It's been like that for most of my life.

McMansions are ugly. I think most people would agree on that. When were they built--in the 90s? Well, that's not what suburbia is about. Suburbia was for safety and for yards for kids to play in, good schools.

Your style of house is sure different though -- most of my generation is happy with a 3 br Cape or ranch, at least where I come from. Some Yuppies want the McMansions but they are show offs, keep up with the Joneses, not typical boomers.

Life without a bathtub would just about kill me--LOL. Nothing like a good soak after a long day. I still enjoy a somewhat formal living room so there's another difference. I have zero desire for a home theater or a place to play computer games so big difference there. I love having a car--even if it's an oldie--because I love to get away on a nice day and get off the beaten path. Maybe that's possible with public transport too but that's another example of the generational differences.

BTW, my generation was never entitled. That makes me mad when people say that. A few made loads of money but most went through divorces and had to start all over again. All of my friends have been divorced at least once and don't have money. Whether it's a man or a woman, they lose out after a divorce and often it's the woman who does worse after a divorce. Usually the husband had a great lawyer and a better job and isn't tied down with kids. (Sometimes the woman wins out if she gets to keep their house and he gets stuck with huge child support payments.)

So anyway, I hope your generation succeeds in reclaiming the cities and that you establish your own style of living. Fewer cars on the road would help with pollution and rehabbing the cities would be a great improvement over what they are now.
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