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Old 04-21-2011, 10:22 PM
 
8,322 posts, read 13,962,854 times
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I don't attend the symphony, unless death metal counts.
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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I live in the suburbs and do attend the sympony. I don't watch AI or DWTS.
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Old 04-24-2011, 11:51 AM
 
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I don't watch American Idol of Dancing With The Stars. I don't even have cable, so I really don't even watch TV anymore. I am only in the suburbs because it's cheaper. Atlanta is getting more expensive inside of the city.
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Old 04-24-2011, 03:00 PM
 
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Generation Y wants the city because there is more nightlife. When they have children they will want the good schools and move to the suburbs. Their children will find them "boring" as teenagers and yearn to move to the city. It happened with the boomers.
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Old 04-24-2011, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
3,391 posts, read 4,062,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'm not a Gen Y but I want to apologize too, for my role in getting the other thread closed. I think this is a good thread.
I agree, this is an interesting thread.
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Old 04-24-2011, 05:33 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo
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I think what we meant to say about the suburbs is that Generation Y wants to live in downtown or dense living situations. Alot of Gen Y wants to be where things are happening.

I am a rarity and fine with a smaller city, slower pace of life with a couple suburban amneties to get by.
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Old 04-24-2011, 05:34 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 22,629,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Generation Y wants the city because there is more nightlife. When they have children they will want the good schools and move to the suburbs. Their children will find them "boring" as teenagers and yearn to move to the city. It happened with the boomers.
That doesn't seem to be happening these days, though. When I look at the urban neighborhoods around here they are now filled with kids, and many of my city friends grew up in the suburbs, moved to the city, and are actively choosing to raise their kids in an urban environment. I think that, in many places, the idea that the natural progression is move to the 'burbs when you have kids is an outdated idea. Even in cities with "bad" public schools there are increasing numbers of parents who are actively fighting to make them better. The older members of Generation Y have kids reaching school age, and many of them are not going to make the move. Or, if things like schools are the issue, they're increasingly trying to move to suburbs that fit the "urban" model. Many don't want to live in boring neighborhoods with only housing. They want to be able to walk places with their kids.
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:11 PM
 
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I don't buy into the "people only live downtown to go to nightclubs" thing. I'm in the generation between the Boomers and GenY (that grumpy GenX bunch) and while I still make it to nightclubs once in a while, I am not a full-time clubber by any means. But I still like urban living--for walkability (to work, services, goods and entertainment), community, and access to amenities of city living like research libraries, museums, city parks, transportation hubs, and obscure foodstuffs. And a lot of suburbs seem to be trying to mimic urban amenities, walkable town centers etcetera in order to retain their own residents' interest.
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:22 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo
4,809 posts, read 10,459,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
I don't buy into the "people only live downtown to go to nightclubs" thing. I'm in the generation between the Boomers and GenY (that grumpy GenX bunch) and while I still make it to nightclubs once in a while, I am not a full-time clubber by any means. But I still like urban living--for walkability (to work, services, goods and entertainment), community, and access to amenities of city living like research libraries, museums, city parks, transportation hubs, and obscure foodstuffs. And a lot of suburbs seem to be trying to mimic urban amenities, walkable town centers etcetera in order to retain their own residents' interest.
Exactly. People live in downtown not just for nightclubs, but transportation, walkability, places to go to besides shopping or parks, and ethnic places to eat and unique shops.

I think the uniqueness of downtowns and the urban feeling conditions is what draws Gen Y and some of X.

Most people complain all suburban or sprawl areas look the same and are boring and require you to drive everywhere.

Oh, and thinking back to the city and suburb thing. Technically, there is usually municipalities (cities, towns, villages, etc...) and then communities which are governed by county governments.

The name of a community/place, rather you live in a city or town, really seems un-important. It's just a name and has different meaning for each state and nation out of the usa.

I think people usually refer to "city" as a downtown or dense urban area. And I think the USA government needs to make definitions for urban, suburban, and rural.

So I think Gen Y wants to be in urban where the boomers wanted to be in suburban. Rural I think is for people escaping the city and also for retiring boomers.

I still like suburban though. I like big box centers, suburban churches, parks, picnics, family bbqs, cruising down bouelavards, and the well-known national retailers such as Costco, Macy's, Target, Home Depot, Trader Joes, and Sear's. And I know some other Gen Y that want to return to their hometowns and raise families like their parents.
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