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Old 03-24-2011, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Toledo, OH
830 posts, read 1,385,329 times
Reputation: 699

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
One difference is that for folks in their twenties, a 1950s Mid-Century or International Style building often counts as an "old house" in the same way as a Craftsman bungalow or a Queen Anne. A lot of Silent/Boomer/Greatest preservation advocates I know simply can't stand the multitude of 40s-60s apartment buildings, many of which demolished beautiful 19th century homes, but to Xers and Yers, they were affordable apartments that are now old enough to have a certain level of funkiness, especially for those with an appreciation for boomerang tables, Melmac tableware and Googie artifacts."

I think a Craftsman bungalow is my ideal.



I wonder what will happen if the trend grows, and all of the old historical homes with character in nice old neighborhoods are bought up. What will the same type of people (most of us here) wind up settling for?

I wonder if at any point in the future, we will straight up dig into our pockets and "build em like they used to", completely like the originals were. Create new neighborhoods, that resemble and function like the old ones were so fond of. I know theres lots of new urbanist developments and what not, but I havent really seen much out there where anyone puts the effort into all the little decorative details and what not on the houses. Maybe we just dont value that enough as a society anymore in our architecture. At least not enough to spend the extra money.
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Old 03-25-2011, 12:04 AM
 
10,630 posts, read 22,836,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chango View Post
There are a couple people who mentioned they like historic buildings/neighborhoods.

I'm an old house junkie and it warms my heart to see the younger generation appreciates them. I felt like I was the only one...
No, you're not the only one. I don't think I mentioned that in my response, but upon reflection, that might have been because I assumed it was a given!

That said, we're considering putting in an application for a 1960s apartment (if we stay here); in this case, location is everything, and while this particular building lacks any historic charm (even most of its 1960s-esque traits have been remodeled out of it) the location is great, and the area has a great blend of some of the best architecture Minneapolis has to offer. If we do end up there, it will be the newest place we've ever lived in.
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Old 03-25-2011, 02:40 AM
 
Location: A circle of Hell so insidious, infernal and odious, Dante dared not map it
623 posts, read 1,012,976 times
Reputation: 472
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chango View Post
...So for the Y'ers here, if money was no object what would be your ideal living environment? What do you want from the world around you? What do you reject that past generations embraced, and what do you like?
I'm Y-ish... I think. I was born at the cusp of X and Y, but would probably be considered a Y.

Anyway, after 14 years in Phoenix I can definitely say it is not what I want in a living environment... and is quite possibly the poster child of what I would avoid in a city. Ideally, I'd prefer a cooler and wetter climate. I really would prefer to live in a denser building, possibly a townhouse as close to the central city as possible; i.e. San Francisco proper, Manhattan, etc.

I really want the diversity, availability, energy, proximity, etc. of living in the city. I really don't like to drive, so I would most prefer to live somewhere I could walk or take public transportation to/from wherever I need to go, or at least a short taxi ride. I feel kind of cheated living where I do now, because I love the aesthetic value of cities and also the feel unique neighborhoods have... none of the above of which are really to be found here. In any case, my goal is to get to a city where I would be happier.

Things I could never embrace my parents do: living in the most far-flung suburban area in town, buying everything as big and gas-guzzling/energy-sucking as possible, road trips, living near family, familiar foods... and I can't really think of anything we all embrace.
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Old 03-25-2011, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,329 posts, read 57,548,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
especially for those with an appreciation for boomerang tables, Melmac tableware
Have you been to my house?!?? Although I don't have a lot of Melmac ... LuRay pastels and Fiesta are more my style. Way back in the 80s when all this 1950s stuff was dirt cheap and languishing in Goodwills, my mom would screech at me: "I threw away that ugly stuff when you were a baby!" LOL
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Old 03-25-2011, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,747,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Have you been to my house?!?? Although I don't have a lot of Melmac ... LuRay pastels and Fiesta are more my style. Way back in the 80s when all this 1950s stuff was dirt cheap and languishing in Goodwills, my mom would screech at me: "I threw away that ugly stuff when you were a baby!" LOL
i have clung to melmac bowls that were a wedding gift to my parents. i have broken 2 and have only 2 left, one of which has a crack such that i should throw it away. i'm going to be crushed when i finally break the last one.
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Old 03-25-2011, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,787 posts, read 7,371,312 times
Reputation: 4321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tobias C View Post
I think a Craftsman bungalow is my ideal.



I wonder what will happen if the trend grows, and all of the old historical homes with character in nice old neighborhoods are bought up. What will the same type of people (most of us here) wind up settling for?

I wonder if at any point in the future, we will straight up dig into our pockets and "build em like they used to", completely like the originals were. Create new neighborhoods, that resemble and function like the old ones were so fond of. I know theres lots of new urbanist developments and what not, but I havent really seen much out there where anyone puts the effort into all the little decorative details and what not on the houses. Maybe we just dont value that enough as a society anymore in our architecture. At least not enough to spend the extra money.
From my point of view, it's hard to believe that will ever happen. In Youngstown, these kinds of homes are being demolished at a steady rate.

Admittedly, many of these demolished houses aren't in "nice" neighborhoods anymore, but that's beceause there is a shortage of urban pioneers to help gentrify the neighborhood, and make it "nice" again. This is true for most rust belt cities, I think.
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Old 03-25-2011, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,747,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
From my point of view, it's hard to believe that will ever happen. In Youngstown, these kinds of homes are being demolished at a steady rate.

Admittedly, many of these demolished houses aren't in "nice" neighborhoods anymore, but that's beceause there is a shortage of urban pioneers to help gentrify the neighborhood, and make it "nice" again. This is true for most rust belt cities, I think.
Agreed. The fundamental housing problem in the midwest is one of supply. unlike in growing western and southern towns, our suburbs serve almost entirely to drain the population of the city, not to supplement it. we are so oversupplied with the houses of those who have moved to the suburbs, it's crazy.
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Old 03-25-2011, 10:09 AM
 
8,325 posts, read 14,114,016 times
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While demolition still occurs, houses being "bought up" is a temporary problem--people still decide to move out, retire, find bigger or smaller quarters, so they always come back on the market. Historic homes are like any other collector's item, they're more expensive and harder to find because they are rare and unique, but for the persistent there's always another opportunity for a score. My advice to the GenY fan of historic homes is to get a cheap mid-century apartment or condo in (or close to) the historic neighborhood where you want to live, save up a down payment (or save up equity) and keep an eye on house listings. In the meantime, read up on how to fix up old houses. When the opportunity comes, use your savings or equity to leverage yourself into your dream house.
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Old 04-03-2011, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Austin
4,095 posts, read 7,216,158 times
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Gen Y here... My ideal would be one of two things-- An apartment or rowhouse in a city or town, or some land in the country with some friends-- perhaps a main house with several tiny houses (or heck, even trailers), and a large area for gardening and animal husbandry. My least ideal situation would be a development of glued-together modern suburban homes off of a freeway access road.
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Old 04-04-2011, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
26,936 posts, read 28,311,155 times
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I am either an old y or a young x. I grew up in the suburbs: in a big metro area and a small one.

I am looking for a complete neighborhood. Walkable "center" with all the important neighborhood amenities: restaurants, bars, theaters, dry cleaners, groceries, farmers markets, city services, drug stores, offices, schools and green space. Housing should be a mix of single family, condo, apartment in all sizes and density in the same neighborhood. Everyone in the area should live less than .75 mi from the center of town and fee safe traveling there by foot/bike or transit. I also hope the spaces are flexible: the school playground turns into the neighborhood park after hours. Businesses with dedicated parking, open up their spots after hours for neighborhood patrons. Job centers do not need to be directly in town, but it should be easily accesible by car or transit.

Density levels? I think 15-25k/sq mi would be about right. We need a bit more density here to support the sie of town center I envision. I'd also like, in the "town center" residential and commercial on top of ground floor retail. With buildings of about 6 floors, it would be feasible to offer below grade parking, 1-2 levels of space for offices and then residential. Multi-use development is required. As you move away from the town center, I envision the density decreasing a bit, but the blocks would be mixed with single family/town homes and smaller garden apartment complexes. The townhomes and larger complexes would offer some green space and each resident could have access to a little plot of land to use for a personal garden. The neighborhood would have outdoor spaces with benches, playgrounds and bbqs. I'd hope every big building could grow a portion of their produce with an herb garden, lettuces, tomatoes and a few fruit trees for the community. And the community could be more self sufficient: solar panels and grey water for the landscaping.

I live in a neighborhood that is pretty close to this right now. The streets mix apartments, single family homes, multi-family homes and 3-4 story condos on each block. I've also seen some houses with big yards, and some with smaller yards. It is eclectic but also keeps the streets pretty busy. Transit in my current neighborhood could improve. We don't have much in the way of theaters, but restaurants and services are abundant. I'd like a slightly shorter walk to the commercial area.

I think one thing that many gen y-ers appreciate is the ability to walk places. Many of us grew up in the burbs where you had to rely on a private auto to get anywhere. We felt trapped, and didn't have any concept of personal freedom until we were of driving age. Especially if your parents did not feel the streets were safe enough to roam freely. As a result, we are looking for places with good access, for all ages.
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