U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-06-2011, 07:10 PM
 
8,325 posts, read 14,058,543 times
Reputation: 4018

Advertisements

Here's the "smaller and compact" Catholic church we have in downtown Sacramento:

Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, Sacramento - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It doesn't have a parking lot, having been built before the automobile, but it's right next to several forms of public transit and a parking garage is a block away--but a neighborhood church generally doesn't need much of a parking lot. There are a couple of smaller Catholic churches within a mile or so--one Portuguese, one Spanish-speaking congregation, and another near Sutter's Fort. While they don't rival this cathedral, they are quite distinct and well-designed architecturally in their own right, as are many of the other neighborhood churches.


In the suburbs, I tend to notice a lot of churches cropping up in strip malls, and mega-churches with huge parking lots that basically look like a Wal-Mart that sells religion instead of cheap plastic crud. In fact, it takes a moment to tell the difference between a big-box church and big-box retail...

Last edited by wburg; 04-06-2011 at 07:47 PM.. Reason: replaced "mega-churches" for "mega-malls"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-06-2011, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,960 posts, read 98,795,031 times
Reputation: 31371
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
In fact, it takes a moment to tell the difference between a big-box church and big-box retail...
That's because some of them once were big box retail. Here, an old Wal Mart is being converted into a mega-church.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2011, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Nipomo
4,818 posts, read 10,530,365 times
Reputation: 1269
Saddleback Church which is one of the largest churches and if not the largest in California is located in suburban Orange County

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2011, 09:14 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 22,744,640 times
Reputation: 6687
As far as churches go, big or small, is that really an issue for most Gen Y members? Not many attend church (or other houses of worship) to begin with. I've seen different statistics, but all of them have one thing in common: most younger people do not attend church on a regular basis. Maybe some of them will in the future, and obviously religion is a huge factor in the lives of some of this generation, but I doubt the vast, vast majority of Gen Y'ers are choosing their location based on religious institutions, regardless of their size.

As far as size goes, I'm not a church-goer myself, but I've been to a number of different churches in cities, suburbs, and small towns. Some have been big places, some have been small -- the biggest have mostly been in the city (grand old early 20th century churches, mostly, built to replace smaller buildings as congregations increased), with a few exceptions. I've been to small churches in all three settings. My favorite have been the smallest ones -- if I were religious I think I would be attracted to the smaller feeling of community or family in one of those places -- but the grand big ones certainly are impressive, too. I haven't been to a modern mega-church.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2011, 10:18 PM
 
8,325 posts, read 14,058,543 times
Reputation: 4018
Actually, I know one local congregation that is primarily people in the Gen-Y age demographic--they are very small (they rent a room in a local Masonic hall) and appeal primarily to young churchgoers (weekly services are normally preceded by a coffee/social hour, and start late enough for people who stayed out at a club until 2 AM.) If anything, GenY folks seem to value the sense of connectedness and community that a neighborhood can provide--and is the sort of role that those little neighborhood churches (like those little neighborhood stores) once provided, before they were superseded by giant mega-churches (like the neighborhood stores got superseded by mega-malls.)

the city: How can you tell that's a church and not a casino or something?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2011, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
26,867 posts, read 28,137,614 times
Reputation: 25975
I went to a Church in Manhattan that was skewed towards young people. It was in a theater/concert venue. They had food: bagels and coffee. And they had a rock band. IT was full of the under-40 set and hipsters. They also had lots of programs to help the community. I think the average gen-y person doesn't want to sit and listen. They want to participate, and smart churches are giving them the opportunity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2011, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
12,899 posts, read 18,446,350 times
Reputation: 13734
Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
As far as churches go, big or small, is that really an issue for most Gen Y members? Not many attend church (or other houses of worship) to begin with. I've seen different statistics, but all of them have one thing in common: most younger people do not attend church on a regular basis. Maybe some of them will in the future, and obviously religion is a huge factor in the lives of some of this generation, but I doubt the vast, vast majority of Gen Y'ers are choosing their location based on religious institutions, regardless of their size.

As far as size goes, I'm not a church-goer myself, but I've been to a number of different churches in cities, suburbs, and small towns. Some have been big places, some have been small -- the biggest have mostly been in the city (grand old early 20th century churches, mostly, built to replace smaller buildings as congregations increased), with a few exceptions. I've been to small churches in all three settings. My favorite have been the smallest ones -- if I were religious I think I would be attracted to the smaller feeling of community or family in one of those places -- but the grand big ones certainly are impressive, too. I haven't been to a modern mega-church.
I was gonna say, how many Y'ers even think about going to church? I wouldn't want to darken the door of a church with my presence unless I'm there to look at the architecture.

I would NEVER consider going to any modern mega church. McChurch sounds...stupid?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2011, 11:12 AM
 
10,630 posts, read 22,744,640 times
Reputation: 6687
Oh, I know there are churches specifically targeted towards younger people, but I think they've come around in part because such a relatively small percentage of younger people attend religious services.

Religion Among the Millennials - Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2011, 03:39 PM
 
7,323 posts, read 8,981,942 times
Reputation: 8377
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Here's the "smaller and compact" Catholic church we have in downtown Sacramento:

Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, Sacramento - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It doesn't have a parking lot, having been built before the automobile, but it's right next to several forms of public transit and a parking garage is a block away--but a neighborhood church generally doesn't need much of a parking lot. There are a couple of smaller Catholic churches within a mile or so--one Portuguese, one Spanish-speaking congregation, and another near Sutter's Fort. While they don't rival this cathedral, they are quite distinct and well-designed architecturally in their own right, as are many of the other neighborhood churches.


In the suburbs, I tend to notice a lot of churches cropping up in strip malls, and mega-churches with huge parking lots that basically look like a Wal-Mart that sells religion instead of cheap plastic crud. In fact, it takes a moment to tell the difference between a big-box church and big-box retail...

Reminds me of the gargantuan cathedrals built in older cities like Boston, NYC, and especially Chicago and Milwaukee, which seem to have great numbers of old 19th-century ornamental stain-glass edifices built by Catholic immigrants from Europe; they may be somewhat large for today's attendees, but they're still quite grand..

A mega-church in a converted Wall Mart? Count me out..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2011, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,725,886 times
Reputation: 2058
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post

A mega-church in a converted Wall Mart? Count me out..
I haven't seen this, but i would be impressed if I did. If done well, the facility would be no worse than a typical mega church box and it would show the congregation was serious about fighting neighborhood decline and minimizing its footprint on the planet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top