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Old 03-22-2011, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
12,940 posts, read 18,504,037 times
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Spinning off from My generation doesn't want to live in the suburbs. , because it's starting to get ugly in there ...

...So for the Y'ers here, if money was no object what would be your ideal living environment? What do you want from the world around you? What do you reject that past generations embraced, and what do you like?

Last edited by Chango; 03-22-2011 at 10:40 AM..
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
12,940 posts, read 18,504,037 times
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My ideal place to live would be basically suburban, with widely spaced homes (100-200 ft frontage) on relatively narrow, tree-lined streets. The homes would be relatively large, well designed, avoid the use of faux materials and be well-porportioned (like what what was built in upscale neighborhoods from the turn of the century through the 30's). The homes would be various styles, individually designed (no duplicated styles/floorplans) but never look out of place with their neighbors. They would also all be well-landscaped.

The homes would ring a central business district of various smaller owner operated stores and offices built right up to wide, tree-shaded sidewalks with apartments/condos above and not be more than 3-4 stories high (yes, new urbanist style). There would be lots of park space, museums, public areas and lots of wild open space outside outside of the city. Cars (individually owned gas and/or electric powered) would not be the dominant landscape feature but would still be the main way to get around (since I'm dreaming, how about freeways/ major thoroughfares and parking garages built underground, with narrow winding streets above?) All electrical lines would be underground, maybe even unpleasant industries/sewage treament/power plants on the edges with farmland above supplying the local needs of the city...

Last edited by Chango; 03-22-2011 at 10:33 AM..
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:37 AM
 
Location: The mountain of Airy
5,154 posts, read 5,008,196 times
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I think I would like to live in a nice and updated rowhouse. Kind of like some of the houses in Society Hill in Philly, the Fan in Richmond, Bolton Hill in Baltimore, etc.

Here's what I mean: http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...6.77,,0,-10.97

The house would have an updated kitchen, bathroom, 2 - 3 bedrooms and a porch/deck out back with some vegetables/fruit. I would also upgrade the insulation, furnace and Central Air to be efficient/low-cost. I'd want to get the house and make the upgrades myself, as I'd want it done exactly as I imagine it to be.

Note: I want to apologize for being one of the main causes for the last thread to be closed. I'm sorry to have broken up the discussion.
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:38 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,615 posts, read 10,324,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
I think I would like to live in a nice and updated rowhouse. Kind of like some of the houses in Society Hill in Philly, the Fan in Richmond, Bolton Hill in Baltimore, etc.
.
All three of which nabes were undergoing renovation in the 1980s
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
12,940 posts, read 18,504,037 times
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...The entire fantasy city of mine would have free wireless internet access. There would be a diversity of races/cultures, very low crime, lots of public gatherings/events, weekly farmers markets, flea markets. There would be a good mix of ages, but as a whole my fantasy city would put a high priority on the well-being and acceptance of children.
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:41 AM
 
Location: The mountain of Airy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
All three of which nabes were undergoing renovation in the 1980s
Yes, now they're all out of my price-range. My wife and I are looking at neighborhoods in Philly where we can do what was done to those houses. The struggle is to know which nabes are stable enough to invest in like that (not for an ROI, but for long-term enjoyment).

EDIT: Now that I think about it, the Fan in Richmond, VA really happened more in the 90s (I believe). The 80s saw some serious de-investment and a lot of crime.

Also, I may be wrong, but Bolton Hill may still be on its way. Not sure if the revitalization occurred in the 80s or not.
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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I'm not a Gen Y but I want to apologize too, for my role in getting the other thread closed. I think this is a good thread.
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:47 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,615 posts, read 10,324,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Yes, now they're all out of my price-range. My wife and I are looking at neighborhoods in Philly where we can do what was done to those houses. The struggle is to know which nabes are stable enough to invest in like that (not for an ROI, but for long-term enjoyment).

EDIT: Now that I think about it, the Fan in Richmond, VA really happened more in the 90s (I believe). The 80s saw some serious de-investment and a lot of crime.

Also, I may be wrong, but Bolton Hill may still be on its way. Not sure if the revitalization occurred in the 80s or not.

Bolton hill was a huge gamble in the 1980s. With rising crime and generation succession (the fear was that since their were fewer Gen xers than boomers, when the boomers headed to the suburbs or uptown nabes, gentrification would roll back) there was fear that North Bolton Hill would be lost. The nabe assoc hired private security guards IIUC (I moved to Canton in 1989), and held on till the arts college expanded.
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:50 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,615 posts, read 10,324,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Yes, now they're all out of my price-range. My wife and I are looking at neighborhoods in Philly where we can do what was done to those houses. The struggle is to know which nabes are stable enough to invest in like that (not for an ROI, but for long-term enjoyment).

EDIT: Now that I think about it, the Fan in Richmond, VA really happened more in the 90s (I believe). The 80s saw some serious de-investment and a lot of crime.

Also, I may be wrong, but Bolton Hill may still be on its way. Not sure if the revitalization occurred in the 80s or not.

I moved into the freshly renovated Old Friends Apt in summer of 1986 - no one had lived in my unit before - I actually visited the building while construction was going on - the old floor of the school gym was still visible. The beethoven had been renovated shortly before that. I dont recall any individual houses being worked on in BH proper (as opposed to Eutaw Street) but I am pretty sure there were some (there were many that had been renovated, and several new developments, just before I got there), and I know boomers who were buying there then.
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:56 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,757 posts, read 39,792,550 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Yes, now they're all out of my price-range. My wife and I are looking at neighborhoods in Philly where we can do what was done to those houses. The struggle is to know which nabes are stable enough to invest in like that (not for an ROI, but for long-term enjoyment).
The area SW of UPenn is recently gentrified and probably much cheaper. Nice looking rowhouses, treelined streets. Remember visiting friends there and liked it. We walked to a nice brunch place nearby.

philadelphia,pa - Google Maps

philadelphia,pa - Google Maps
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