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Old 05-02-2011, 07:45 AM
 
4,728 posts, read 4,393,967 times
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Default What do you think are the "Urban" style, "Suburban" style, and "Urban/suburban" style cities in the USA?

I think these are all the urban style cities in the USA: New York , Chicago, San Francisco, Washington DC, Philadelphia, Boston.

Seattle, Los Angeles, Portland, and San Diego to me still seem like urban style cities but expressed a bit differently from the ones above.
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I think all the suburban style cities in the USA are Phoenix, Sacramento, San Jose, El Paso, Indianapolis, Orlando, Tampa, San Antonio, and Memphis.
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I dont know whether to put Houston, Austin, Dallas, Atlanta, Minneapolis, Honolulu, Miami, and Denver in the urban or suburban style cities. They seem like they are both at the same time so I will also include an "urban and suburban style" at the same time category for these cities. But these cities definitely seem more suburban than the cities that are exclusively in the urban style categories.

Does everybody agree those are urban style, suburban style, and urban/suburban style cities in the USA?
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Old 05-02-2011, 07:56 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,476 posts, read 5,339,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Does everybody agree those are urban style, suburban style, and urban/suburban style cities in the USA?
Agreement? On this forum?!?

I think your lists are pretty good, if not incomplete.
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Old 05-02-2011, 08:12 AM
 
4,728 posts, read 4,393,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Agreement? On this forum?!?

I think your lists are pretty good, if not incomplete.
Well if you agree with my list, can you give me a +1 rep point then.
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Old 05-02-2011, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,516 posts, read 14,721,921 times
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why don't you look up a definition of Urban and suburban and then go from there

ur·ban

In, relating to, or characteristic of a city or town
- the urban population

Denoting or relating to popular dance music of black origin
- a party that features the best in urban music

Denoting popular black culture in general

Urban is a common name, from the Latin urbanus (from the city).



sub·ur·ban
Residential areas of a large city, or separate residential communities within commuting distance of a city.

whether density freaks like it or not, all cities are urban centers because if they were not they would not be cities, because that is what urban means it means relating to the city. It does not mean packed in like sardines type of city.

suburban does not mean low density single family homes either. Suburban means areas that are primarily residential without a major economic center.

all the freaking cities on your list are urban style because they are all cities, and this have things related to cities and thus are all urban.

At the same time all of them have suburban areas.

the only difference between them is density, and as I mentioned before urban is not a synonym for density
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Old 05-02-2011, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,094 posts, read 2,946,454 times
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merely from my experience (ie only to cities i have experienced first hand)

suburban style:
dallas, atlanta, phoenix

suburban style, but more hybrid:
SLC, columbus, indianapolis, albuquerque, detroit, omaha, denver

urban style
nyc, seattle, cincinnati, cleveland, chicago, pittsburgh, st louis, kansas city, washington
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Old 05-02-2011, 09:18 AM
 
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All of those cities have suburban neighborhoods. All of the "suburban style" ones have some remnant of an urban core. It's not either/or, nor hybrid--perhaps a continuum, a matter of degree.
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Old 05-02-2011, 09:22 AM
 
Location: The City
18,512 posts, read 14,507,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
All of those cities have suburban neighborhoods. All of the "suburban style" ones have some remnant of an urban core. It's not either/or, nor hybrid--perhaps a continuum, a matter of degree.

I agree to me the level of urbanity is typically the maintained and cohesive aspect on the continuum - density factors only as a ticket of entry (not the defination just a qualifier so to speak) for the areas but it is in the cohesion on the continuum that distinquishes places.

People will post a definition of urbanity but there are different shades so to speak and to believe the level of urbanity is equal in all cities is very short-sighted. It does not make one place better or wrose as these are subjective qualities but it absolutely is a distinguisahble feature.
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Old 05-02-2011, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,516 posts, read 14,721,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
I agree to me the level of urbanity is typically the maintained and cohesive aspect on the continuum - density factors only as a ticket of entry (not the defination just a qualifier so to speak) for the areas but it is in the cohesion on the continuum that distinquishes places.

People will post a definition of urbanity but there are different shades so to speak and to believe the level of urbanity is equal in all cities is very short-sighted. It does not make one place better or wrose as these are subjective qualities but it absolutely is a distinguisahble feature.
I didn't post a definition of urbanity posted one of urban. Two different things, look it up.

Urbanity has different levels, but urban is urban. wburg was right in his analysis, you are merging the two words together.

urbanity refers to characteristics and traits of the city, which do come in different levels.

Urban relates to anything of cities.

when you are comparing densities you are comparing urbanity, when you are comparing living in the city or living alone on a mountain, you are describing urban life. Two different words.



urbanity

- the quality or character of life in a city or town;

ur·ban

In, relating to, or characteristic of a city or town
- the urban population

Urban is a common name, from the Latin urbanus (from the city).


sub·ur·ban
Residential areas of a large city, or separate residential communities within commuting distance of a city.

cit·y
1. A center of population, commerce, and culture; a town of significant size and importance.
2.
a. An incorporated municipality in the United States with definite boundaries and legal powers set forth in a charter granted by the state.
b. A Canadian municipality of high rank, usually determined by population but varying by province.
c. A large incorporated town in Great Britain, usually the seat of a bishop, with its title conferred by the Crown.
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Old 05-03-2011, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Seattle Area
624 posts, read 639,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
merely from my experience (ie only to cities i have experienced first hand)

suburban style:
dallas, atlanta, phoenix

suburban style, but more hybrid:
SLC, columbus, indianapolis, albuquerque, detroit, omaha, denver

urban style
nyc, seattle, cincinnati, cleveland, chicago, pittsburgh, st louis, kansas city, washington
Umm, sorry no
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Old 05-03-2011, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,094 posts, read 2,946,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtownboogie View Post
Umm, sorry no
yeah, i think you must not know those cities very well then. cincinnati mostly developed decades before the car was invented, e.g.
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