U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-01-2011, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Baltimore Suburbs
2,583 posts, read 1,857,015 times
Reputation: 1320

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
Well, since this is CITY data forum, not SUBURB data forum, you'd expect to get a lot more city lovers than suburb lovers now, wouldn't you?
When people in 'city' data talk about talk about their city's metro population, remember that those "suburb lovers" make up the majority.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-01-2011, 01:59 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
12,474 posts, read 7,685,376 times
Reputation: 6930
Quote:
Originally Posted by LongIslandPerson View Post
Well, when I said "reality", I was referring to city people who often use it in that context.
Yes i know what you mean, Thanks again
I guess we all have different views on living in reality.
reality for some people is to live in a quiet suburb and commute to the city to go shopping, bar hopping, out to eat, go to work etc..

someone said today "all those suburbs are good for is hiding from reality"
Lol i guess the suburbs have large walls around them and no one can leave
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Duarte, CA
5,167 posts, read 5,398,934 times
Reputation: 3332
Not sure if other people see it this way but to me, there's little difference between cookie-cutter-ness of suburban houses, malls, big-box stores and the cookie-cutter-ness of communist housing:



VS:

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 02:12 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
12,474 posts, read 7,685,376 times
Reputation: 6930
Not all suburbs look like that
Where i grew up the houses actually had a yard, plenty of room in the back front and side yards
Woodbury, MN - Google Maps
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 02:19 PM
 
Location: KCMO, returning to Indy in 2012!
121 posts, read 57,657 times
Reputation: 79
Not all suburbs are created equal.

Personally, I really enjoy most inner-ring suburbs and older streetcar-era suburbs, they have as much quality and character as most urban neighborhoods do. I also like many edge cities, which may be mostly made up of traditional suburban sprawl neighborhoods but also have very lively and dense urban cores that serve as the hub of the community.

The ones I do not care for are the completely car-centric sprawling burbs that are so common in America. If there's no "there" there, then I don't really want anything to do with it. That said, many people prefer that lifestyle and that's great, to each their own. I'm glad they have that option. Just not my cup of tea.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2011, 12:38 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,926 posts, read 3,226,385 times
Reputation: 1206
That horrible picture of the suburbs isn't even close to the suburbs I know and used to live in. Those houses and lot sizes would be more typical of a city - people crammed in. The suburbs (or exurbs) that I think of feature minimum of half acre lots, large, new houses and big garages and back yards. The suburbs I like are the ones that the urbanists are always complaining about.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2011, 01:11 AM
 
Location: Chicago
11 posts, read 9,133 times
Reputation: 21
people from the suburbs claim to be from the city their town surrounds and never the place they are actually from, annoying from the city side
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2011, 06:35 AM
 
Location: now nyc
1,460 posts, read 2,060,563 times
Reputation: 1159
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
Not sure if other people see it this way but to me, there's little difference between cookie-cutter-ness of suburban houses, malls, big-box stores and the cookie-cutter-ness of communist housing:



VS:
You know those generic Communists housing blocks ARE in cities, right?

Plus, most cities (well, at least in the Northeast and Midwest) have entire sections of their city consisting of only rowhouses, and rowhouses are usually to each other [cookie-cutter].
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2011, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Chicago
1,279 posts, read 816,843 times
Reputation: 1383
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobMarley_1LOVE View Post
I hear people talk so much trash about the suburbs in there metro region for some reason. People in the Twin Cities diss our suburbs over the internet but in person if they meet someone from the suburbs there all friendly and nice.

Chicago seems to diss on there suburbs too. epically Schaumburg (which actually seems like a really awesome suburb)

But really all i hear is "Your cookie cutter homes are too boring" "Everyone in the suburbs are sheltered and boring"

I grew up in a Suburb and i loved the Homes with large yards and Large shopping centers. I moved to a city mostly because its more convenient for me. I do like the public transportation and how i can walk a couple blocks to University Ave where i can do all my shopping and get food.
It's basically two different lifestyles, some people choose the suburb lifestyle and enjoy it, they prefer to have more room live more spread out and not dense.
Here's what I find puzzling: People don't like the city (for whatever reason) and move to the suburbs. Fine. I get that. But the problem is when those people who don't want to live, or generally associate with the city, and the type of life that entails, continue to use the city in daily life.

Work, shopping, entertainment, etc.

My family moved from the city to a suburb/town "to get away from the city". But you know what happened? My dad still worked in the city. We still went to our church in the city. We still do a vast majority of our shopping in the city. If we wanted to eat at a restaurant that wasn't fast food, we went into the city. Concerts, movies, and sports were all reasons why we left our suburb/town to go into the city.

And when you factor in how most people get into the city, Interstates, the amount of congestion and delays by having everyone living outside, and heading in everyday, makes for terrible driving conditions for all involved.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2011, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Chicago
415 posts, read 383,722 times
Reputation: 373
My big problem is that I just consider them way overrated and not for me. Every single aspect that people argue with in favor of suburbs from bigger yards and houses and easier parking just makes me yawn. I am a city person to the core and that will never change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top