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Old 12-05-2011, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,955 posts, read 18,761,493 times
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Do we really need all the freeway space that was so popular in the recent past?

Cities are re-thinking that point and some have come to the conclusion......maybe not.
" In fact, the dirty secret of freeways is that they don’t reduce traffic, they create it. Ask any urban planner: Give people more roads, and more of them will drive. "

Are freeways doomed? - Dream City - Salon.com
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Old 12-05-2011, 05:18 PM
 
Location: bend oregon
971 posts, read 928,017 times
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i dont think theres any way around it, unless you had good transit
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Old 12-05-2011, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drum bro View Post
i dont think theres any way around it, unless you had good transit
Most definitely.

Another thing is that there are some freeways that are redundantly place and some that are useful for connecting areas far apart. But I'd bet most cities have redundant routes. There can't be too many positives for having freeways parallel each other in the same direction.
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Old 12-05-2011, 08:10 PM
 
Location: NYC
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Freeways have come down. The Embarcadero is a good example of that. The West Side Highway, as well.
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Old 12-05-2011, 08:24 PM
 
Location: The City
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In the 50s and 60s Spring Garden street was identified as part of an inner loop freeway system, these are the new plans today

How Green Is Your (Spring) Garden (Street)? | Hidden City Philadelphia
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Old 12-05-2011, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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There's been a lot discussion about the Gardiner Expressway, which is the only highway into downtown Toronto. Some want to bury it or get rid of it entirely (especially since it's getting old) since they feel it blocks off the city from the waterfront. However, if it does act as a barrier to the waterfront, it's more psychological than physical, because at least within downtown, it's elevated.

Others have accepted that the Gardiner is there to stay and are looking at ways of beautifying it. I think the Gardiner is not that much of a barrier as this point. I think Lakeshore Boulevard, a high speed arterial which often has two pairs of crossing lights (one to the median, to the other side of the road) is the real barrier with the railway underpass being just as much of a barrier as the Gardiner.

Since the Gardiner/Don Valley Parkway goes through the downtown waterfront, you could argue that it could be terminated at either end of downtown with any crosstown traffic being redirected to highway 401. I'm not sure about that though, I think I might prefer having all those cars elevated more or less out of sight than dumped onto city streets.
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Old 12-06-2011, 01:06 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
5,601 posts, read 8,661,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Freeways have come down. The Embarcadero is a good example of that. The West Side Highway, as well.
The Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle- Buh bye, and good riddance when its completed (the removal of it)
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Old 12-06-2011, 01:21 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
46,078 posts, read 45,803,671 times
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Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
The Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle- Buh bye, and good riddance when its completed (the removal of it)
Yea. That really didn't belong in the downtown. Killed the waterfront in some ways.
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Old 12-07-2011, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, Canada
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Both with Toronto and Seattle it seems that city planners weren't aware of the value of waterfront.

It's peculiar to put a great big elevated highway in what should be the desirable, showcase part of the city. Seattle's waterfront looks a lot worse-off for it compared with Vancouver, despite having scenery that's just as good in total and a comparatively larger stalk of historic buildings downtown. Seattle should be prettier than it is.
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Old 12-07-2011, 08:14 AM
 
Location: NYC
7,312 posts, read 11,956,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CairoCanadian View Post
Both with Toronto and Seattle it seems that city planners weren't aware of the value of waterfront.

It's peculiar to put a great big elevated highway in what should be the desirable, showcase part of the city. Seattle's waterfront looks a lot worse-off for it compared with Vancouver, despite having scenery that's just as good in total and a comparatively larger stalk of historic buildings downtown. Seattle should be prettier than it is.
When the viaduct was constructed Seattle's downtown was a working seaport. Not exactly glamorous. now the port is further south.

Even with the Viaduct in place Seattle did provide great access to the waterfront via walkways. Yeah, the highway seemed out of place and its removal will be an improvement, but I didn't find the viaduct too intrusive when I lived in DT Seattle.
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