U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-19-2011, 03:52 PM
 
35 posts, read 144,761 times
Reputation: 78

Advertisements

I was reading a article about how if Americans continue their present lifestyle then 1/3 will be diabetic by 2050. It got me to thinking about how much the landscape of a cities plays into the public health. Cities that are denser and more pedestrian friendly allow for its citizens to be more active, while ones that are more sprawled out discourage its citizens from being active. With this in mind it would seem that reducing sprawl should not be just an enviornmental or economic issue, but also a public health issue. Thoughts?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-19-2011, 04:26 PM
 
6,435 posts, read 9,955,147 times
Reputation: 7993
Quote:
Originally Posted by itwhite View Post
I was reading a article about how if Americans continue their present lifestyle then 1/3 will be diabetic by 2050. It got me to thinking about how much the landscape of a cities plays into the public health. Cities that are denser and more pedestrian friendly allow for its citiz ens to be more active, while ones that are more sprawled out discourage its citizens from being active. With this in mind it would seem that reducing sprawl should not be just an enviornmental or economic issue, but also a public health issue. Thoughts?
That is not true. Think logically for a second. Cities are FILLED with cars and buses and all types of congested automobiles. Major cities are always the ones with high levels of toxic fumes and pollution in the air. What makes you think most of them are pedestrian friendly and good for your health? I know for a fact most of the sprawled suburban communities are MORE pedestrian friendly than cities because I've lived in them and they are FILLED with sidewalks and trails and parks EVERYWHERE. And plenty of people go running and jogging and getting their exercise on. With clean air to breathe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 05:47 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,999 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Agreed, it's not true. This has come up before on CD. The highest rates of obesity are in the inner cities. I believe I have posted links about this in the past.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 07:09 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,101,267 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by itwhite View Post
I was reading a article about how if Americans continue their present lifestyle then 1/3 will be diabetic by 2050. It got me to thinking about how much the landscape of a cities plays into the public health. Cities that are denser and more pedestrian friendly allow for its citizens to be more active, while ones that are more sprawled out discourage its citizens from being active. With this in mind it would seem that reducing sprawl should not be just an enviornmental or economic issue, but also a public health issue. Thoughts?
I think there is some truth to that, but not much. Wealth is a much clearer predictor of health. Yes higher density and low car ownership means more walking but in my city, where obesity, heart disease, diabetes and HIV are remarkably prevalent, walking doesn't seem to make a dent in the problem.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 07:15 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,101,267 times
Reputation: 3117
Maybe it would be useful to examine if wealthy cities are healthier than suburbs of comparable wealth? The problem with this comparison is that crushing poverty, and its related health problems, is not as prevalent in suburbs as in inner cities and rural areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 07:40 PM
 
1,682 posts, read 2,721,264 times
Reputation: 713
The obesity rates in inner city ghettos have little to do with development and everything to do with poverty when looking at truely urban, walkable cities.

Most urbanites get their recomended minimum daily exercise simply by living. By comparison most suburbanites spend their time at single locations, driving between them. From bed, to car seat, to office chair, to car seat, to couch, to bed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 08:03 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,999 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
The obesity rates in inner city ghettos have little to do with development and everything to do with poverty when looking at truely urban, walkable cities.

Most urbanites get their recomended minimum daily exercise simply by living. By comparison most suburbanites spend their time at single locations, driving between them. From bed, to car seat, to office chair, to car seat, to couch, to bed.
Not this tired old canard again!

What does the urban guy do? Please describe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 08:10 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,265,973 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenk893 View Post
That is not true.
Uh, yes it is.


A typical street in the big city looks like this, filled with people walking around:





While a typical street in the suburbs looks like this:

Do you see anybody walking around?
No, because they are all inside their homes watching tv or playing video games.


http://www.****/suburban-s...umb8749884.jpg

Last edited by nei; 12-19-2011 at 08:29 PM.. Reason: copyright violation
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 08:31 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Maybe it would be useful to examine if wealthy cities are healthier than suburbs of comparable wealth? The problem with this comparison is that crushing poverty, and its related health problems, is not as prevalent in suburbs as in inner cities and rural areas.
I remember finding a study that did just that and posted it a while back. I could dig it up, but it'd take a bit of work. I think it found cities slightly healthier once you controlled for demographics, but the difference was small, and other factors could overwhelm it easily.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 08:34 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
@cisco kid

Not even midtown Manhattan is typically that full of people, except maybe in a few spots around rush hour. In that photo, there are so many people there it would be hard to walk at a good speed. You can see people overflowing onto the road because the sidewalk isn't big enough.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
What does the urban guy do? Please describe.
Walk more instead of drive everywhere for transportation. At least that's the idea.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top