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Old 01-06-2012, 07:21 AM
 
Location: the future
1,748 posts, read 3,202,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
Yes, what happened to the DC suburbs? Everyone says they are so affluent, but that is lying with statistics. There is a core 10% of people who make millions which gives the impression that everyone is rich but in reality an ever increasing number of people in the Washington DC suburbs are poor. Their wages (income) may be higher than people in lower cost areas but because housing is so expensive the average middle class person in the DC suburbs is really struggling far more than the typical person is a regular town like Nashville or Tulsa.
You work too much hence that blatant generalizations. Have you been to DCs suburbs pg county included? How do you figure I'm or we're struggling compared to someone who lives in Nashville, or Oklahoma of all places even when the stats say otherwise?
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Old 01-06-2012, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Old Hyde Park, Kansas City,MO
1,145 posts, read 1,959,483 times
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I think Gentrification in Oakland and San Francisco has pushed a lot of crime out Richmond and Vallejo
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Old 01-08-2012, 11:37 AM
 
8,575 posts, read 8,743,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
I am talking about all suburbs and cities
I am not sure how you answer a question with a one size fits all answer. Certainly smaller older cities like Pittsburgh have gentrified to the point where the city is wealthier than the immediate suburbs. But in another state, those suburbs would be part of the city itself.

You see around NYC that small industrial towns within a 100 miles of the city have absorbed a lot of the poor from the city. But they are too far away to be considered suburbs by the conventional definition.

While gentrification certainly forces some of the older population out, if they go beyond the city limits is a function of the size of the city.
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:30 PM
 
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This is an interesting question.

I've noticed that core cities in the west (USA) are hardly ever among the worst, yet the metropolitan areas themselves can just as easily rank among the most violent as further east.
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Old 01-12-2012, 02:16 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
6,151 posts, read 11,297,246 times
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I tend to not believe the hype about suburbia declining. Logically the European model doesn't make sense. Wouldn't richer people want a larger house on a larger piece of land, more quiet, privacy,and open space rather than live downtown? Subsidized health care and education aside, this is why the quality of daily living in the US is better than Europe or Asia, because the average person in America is able to live in a suburban single family home. Downtown London, Paris, or Rome may be nice to visit, but I would rather live in a suburb with open lawns, shopping centers and Walmarts where I can park for free and lots of open space and not have to crowd with a thousand other people on a crowded train or sidewalk. Actually some of the richest people in Europe actually are buying suburban homes. I think in most British cities, its also the inner city thats bad.
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Old 01-12-2012, 02:17 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
6,151 posts, read 11,297,246 times
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And also, I always wonder why suburban areas aren't doing more to resist Section 8 housing. And while its not true in all cities, in Baltimore the construction of mass transit and bus lines into the suburbs has led to increases in crime there. In fact the Light Rail is called the Loot Rail by many suburban residents. The malls near the stops have seen a spike in theft, and also a rise in violent crime in all these areas.
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Old 01-12-2012, 08:35 AM
 
4,945 posts, read 8,106,642 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
Yes, what happened to the DC suburbs? Everyone says they are so affluent, but that is lying with statistics. There is a core 10% of people who make millions which gives the impression that everyone is rich but in reality an ever increasing number of people in the Washington DC suburbs are poor. Their wages (income) may be higher than people in lower cost areas but because housing is so expensive the average middle class person in the DC suburbs is really struggling far more than the typical person is a regular town like Nashville or Tulsa.
Let me help! I think DC doesn't have the ubber rich like NYC but what it does have is an enormous base of upper middle class residents that no other city (maybe SF/Boston) can compete with. People in DC are much better off than a lot of places where the economy is in the tank.
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Old 01-12-2012, 08:54 AM
 
Location: The City
21,885 posts, read 30,081,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
Let me help! I think DC doesn't have the ubber rich like NYC but what it does have is an enormous base of upper middle class residents that no other city (maybe SF/Boston) can compete with. People in DC are much better off than a lot of places where the economy is in the tank.

Can you say Federal Funds
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Old 01-13-2012, 11:43 AM
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Location: New York / Long Island, NY
45,499 posts, read 38,307,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
Logically the European model doesn't make sense. Wouldn't richer people want a larger house on a larger piece of land, more quiet, privacy,and open space rather than live downtown?
You're projecting your tastes and culture to others. The ideal living preferences vary a lot depending on place. Someone else might find all that privacy and open space strangely isolating. One think that might be constant is that rich people tend to prefer to live where other rich people live.

Going back to the OP, in the NYC metro, as the city got better, the suburbs did not decline; in fact they got a bit better. Many didn't grow, but that was because anti-growth policies. At least in NYC metro, most of the suburbs (except ones already poor) were too wealthy for the poor to move in. One poor suburb (Hempstead) got an influx of poor people but they were fleeing severe urban decay. When New York declined (mostly 1970s), a lot of the suburbs had similar but smaller declines (NYC had a 10% population decline in the 70s; a neighboring suburban county decline by 7.5% and other suburbs did something similar). It was an economic decline in the whole metro area, similar to a rust belt city though not as severe or for as long.

What about Seattle? Boston? San Francisco? Didn't they get the suburb and city grow together?

When the center city does better, it gives a boost to the whole metro area. Job growth in the center city boosts the suburbs and the center city gets more attention to the whole metro area which increases the reputation of the whole area.
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Old 01-13-2012, 12:33 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,551 posts, read 10,067,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
The building of mass transit into the burbs has also done much to increase crime here.

Transit Stations May Actually Cut Down on Crime - Commute - The Atlantic Cities
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