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Old 01-26-2012, 06:38 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/26/ar....html?ref=arts
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Old 01-26-2012, 11:34 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Good article, though the NYC example isn't technically public housing. It's a co-op designed to be affordable, not government built and run (Battery Park City is a tower park complex and government built and partially run. So was the adjacent World Trade Center) . Stuyesant Town is another Manhattan example that uses a design and style identical to tower in the park housing projects (they look very similar, though Stuyesant Town is bigger than any project) and is desireable.

I think tower in the park designs have been blamed as more failures more than is accurate.
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Old 01-26-2012, 11:40 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Good article, though the NYC example isn't technically public housing. It's a co-op designed to be affordable, not government built and run (Battery Park City is a tower park complex and government built and partially run. So was the adjacent World Trade Center) . Stuyesant Town is another Manhattan example that uses a design and style identical to tower in the park housing projects (they look very similar, though Stuyesant Town is bigger than any project) and is desireable.

I think tower in the park designs have been blamed as more failures more than is accurate.
Good point about the co-op. The article says that the units sold for $3,000 apiece when new. Perhaps an ownership-based scheme like that could work with social housing today (though a lot of cities have given up on building housing projects, I think). Guaranteed credit with 20% down and a purchase price way under market value, say $20,000. Of course this would need to be subsidized to a degree that nothing is anymore.
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Old 01-26-2012, 02:16 PM
 
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Tower-in-the-park can contribute to but is not a cause for failier. That would be highly concentrated isolated poverty. The primary culpret.
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Old 01-27-2012, 08:03 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Pruitt Igoe: 33 buildings 11 stories high. From the air they look a bit menacing:



from

File:Pruitt-igoeUSGS02.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Penn South in the article isn't really a big tower in the park development; it didn't destroy the street system. Instead, here's Stuyesant town in Manhattan, 56 buildings with 25,000 people:

http://www.bloomberg.com/image/if.FTfjsi3Oc.jpg

a bit bigger and less out of place. Both were meant to alleviate urban overcrowding.
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Old 02-01-2012, 06:35 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Out of curiosity, how easy is it in other US cities for a visitor inadverently to walk near or next to a housing project? In NYC it's not hard to do. I'd assume housing projects are rare in western cities, but what about other northeastern or midwestern cities? Do they tend to be tucked away in bad neighborhoods most outsiders would never go or scattered around?
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Old 02-01-2012, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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^^Nei, in Cincinnati, it's a little of both. Some are smaller-scale and mixed among privately owned housing, along well-traveled streets; others are huge housing developments not really isolated, but set apart with one or two accesses from a main street, not unlike a modern gated subdivision. Those huge public housing developments became their own bad neighborhood.

In Erie, Pa., the public housing that I know of is small-scale and scattered throughout the city, and most is located along well-traveled streets. There's a mix of high-rises (mostly for elderly residents), townhouses, and low-rise apartment buildings.
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Old 02-01-2012, 09:23 AM
 
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Where I live, they look like this:

sacramento, ca - Google Maps

sacramento, ca - Google Maps

Both of these examples were WPA projects completed in 1942. They are located next to neighborhoods that were industrial at the time (canneries and mills) and I think they were used as worker housing for those canneries (I have met a couple people who lived there and either they or their parents worked in the nearby canneries.) Now they're kind of isolated by freeways but not all that remote. Both have elementary schools nearby.

Here's a 1960s/70s project in all its Brutalist glory:

sacramento, ca - Google Maps

There are a few of these in the central city, primarily senior housing.

Here's a 1990s project:

sacramento, ca - Google Maps

Both of these are in Midtown, the mixed-use neighborhood next to downtown Sacramento.

And here's a 21st century housing project:

From the air--
sacramento, ca - Google Maps

And from the ground--
sacramento, ca - Google Maps

It's a gated, suburban-style community but each building is a fourplex. A friend lives there, it's pretty quiet. WalkScore is 42--car-dependent. I have a friend who lives there and doesn't have a car, he depends on a couple of friends with cars who take him shopping because walkability there is garbage.
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Old 02-01-2012, 10:33 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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I actually like the brutalist building, but the houses nearby are much nice looking. I'm always impressed by much treed your Sacramento streets are while still dense. The 1940s complex looks very sterile.

Are all those Sacramento "public housing projects"? As in a government built, owned run housing development, intended for low income people and subsidized with all their negative connotations. Often tower in the park, like the St. Louis one, though they don't have to be, as Ohiogirl mentioned.

What I meant were low-income housing projects that in or near the city center or at least well traveled streets that a visitor could stumble upon them. For example, this large housing project (4000-5000 people) is right next to the Brooklyn Bridge, and a tourist walking might end up passing it by mistake. Also is not far from city hall.

new york,ny - Google Maps

(Projects on left) I meant someone who said her grandmother lived in one of those. Said the inside of her apartment was decent, the common areas were a bit wrecked (pee in the elevator?) from tenants with social problems.
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Old 02-01-2012, 10:40 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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edgar allen poe house - Google Maps

The Edgar Allen Poe house and attached row of projects. This was not planned; nobody knew the historical significance of the house and it due to be razed but was "saved" at the last minute. It doesn't get many visitors, as one could imagine, and is constantly plagued by money troubles.

edgar allen poe house - Google Maps

Southeast Baltimore gentrification has crept up on these. Nobody thinks they'll be there in 20 years.
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