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Old 03-14-2012, 12:21 PM
 
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Why is Canada into highrise apartments ?

I'm shocked that many cities big and small and also in the suburbs have so many highrise apartments .

Most cities in US are not into highrise apartments it is 2 ,3 or 4 story apartments in the US.

What is strange is many of the highrise apartments are not in the down town area but in the suburbs .

Many cities in Canada have highrise apartments .

Ottawa

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Edmonton

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Brantford a population of 90,192 that is a sprawl very small city town has this too !!


Brantford - Google Maps


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Thunder Bay population of 122,907 out in no where no other cities or towns close by and out in no where has this too !!

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Even Hamilton ,London ,Kitchener has this too !!

Toronto and the Toronto suburbs has many highrise apartments.


Note alot of the highrise apartments are in the suburbs above with low density sprawl !!!


I believe most of the highrise apartments where built in the 60's and 70's and litte in the late 50's and early 80's but not much. In the past 10 years and 6 years for sure there is trend for highrise condos in Canada and very much so Toronto even in the suburbs.


This is very alien for most US cities even in some parts in New York city does not have this and the density in US cities like low ,medium, high or very high density seems to match more in the US cities. Not putting some high density building in with low density sprawl that looks out of place.

I know close to water in Miami and Fort Lauderdale have highrise condos but that is understandable do to high demad and prime location. But away from the water in Miami and Fort Lauderdale this not the case.
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Old 03-14-2012, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Syracuse, New York
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When people immigrated from Asian countries to Canada, they brought their love of high rise apartments with them.
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Old 03-14-2012, 12:43 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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zoning restrictions might prohibit high rises in most American suburbs, though that probably won't explain all of the difference
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Old 03-14-2012, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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I think it's more of the opposite. Something like most Canadian cities encourage dense development or something like that. Though I wouldn't know without looking more into it.
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Old 03-14-2012, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SyraBrian View Post
When people immigrated from Asian countries to Canada, they brought their love of high rise apartments with them.
The first wave of highrises, the 60s-70s rental towers happened before substantial immigration from Asia. Even now, new condos downtown might have a lower percentage Asians than the city as a whole, although the old suburban towers have quite a lot Asians currently. I'm not sure what the new suburban condos are like.

I'm not especially familiar with how this trend started in the 50s/60s since that's well before I was born, but I think part of it was that the vision for the future was based on modernism and the garden city, but not limitted single family housing.
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Old 03-15-2012, 04:20 PM
 
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A better question would be why are Americans so vehemently against density/high-rises.
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Old 03-15-2012, 04:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
A better question would be why are Americans so vehemently against density/high-rises.

These apartments are not in density area 90% of the time !! They are in sprawl suburbs with very low density.

In Boston , Chicago or New York it would fit in nice do to the density of those cities but not in suburbs of Boston , Chicago or New York .

Some of these highrise apartments are in very small cities and tows and static cities with no growth. So supply and demand go out the window here.

Place by the water or high demand and low supply or lack of land make alot more logic to build up but this is not the case here.
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Old 03-15-2012, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Purgatory
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I don't know for sure, but I love high rise apartments. The only place in the US that has something similar is Miami and of course, New York. It beats endless urban sprawl and helps keep the heart of the city alive. Miami has done a great job with this. When I first went there 10 years ago, the downtown was dead, now it's buzzing and is mixed residential and commercial. Definitely the way to go, as high rise & condo living is attractive to many people who want to live within walking distance of work and who don't want to live in the suburbs.
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Old 03-15-2012, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Brantford looks like public housing, at least some of it does. I've always been a fan of tower in the park architecture... although it does make more sense it high density areas. I can see the appeal of Waverly Towers in Thunder Bay definitely. It stands out from the neighborhood, but that's not a bad thing.
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Old 03-15-2012, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Oh, I can tell you what this is all about, it has to do with differences in the geography of urban wealth and race relations. So essentially, the spread of suburbia in the USA wasn't just about expanding the city in what was then considered the modern way, a way that took advantage of automobile technology and gave people the option of single family houses. It took on racial nuance in the phenomenon known as "White Flight." In the post war period, when America was building these new additions to cities, they consciously built them as middle class neighbourhoods where you needed the money to invest in your own home. This precluded Blacks moving into the neighbourhoods, who were largely renters, which increased the desirability for whites, which meant they'd pay more to live in these areas. White Flight's destruction of the inner city also meant all that real estate was totally devalued, so poor people had these abandoned inner cities to go to for affordable housing options. Canada at the time was basically racially homogenous and the racial history we did have with the tiny numbers of urban African Canadians, largely descended from 19th century African Americans involved in the railroad industry in Central Canada (the Maritime ones were more likely to be of Black Loyalist descent), was less acrimonious. As such, when we built suburbs the developers sometimes put those high rises there because they made money. They were rented to people who couldn't afford the houses and with that density the developers made lots of money from them. Building for more of a range of incomes is actually a good way to maximize profits in some real estate markets. There was also more of a market for new rental units because the inner cities only suffered from people being attracted to suburbs, not fleeing to them. As such they never got so bad and there wasn't a glut of affordable housing for the urban poor. As more Canadians became middle class through 80's and 90's (not that these were ideal economic periods but we certainly weren't shrinking economically) the demand for new rentals decreased as the low income demographic remained fairly static and the middle class that could afford a modest home grew.

That's how the first wave happened. The second wave has to do with our exploding real estate prices and efforts to contain sprawl. Urban areas like Greater Toronto and Greater Vancouver are now protecting the farm land outside the city to contain sprawl, but people are still piling into these cities, which means the price of single family homes has gone up beyond what people can afford. To deal with that the market is building tons of condos so that middle class people can afford homes. Zoning is flexible in letting developers build tall in some locations, and highrise is what makes economic sense in this particular real estate environment where demand is high and it's tough to get one's hand on a suitable piece of land. NIMBYs can't stop it in the same way since suburban highrises have always existed in these suburbs, especially in areas like Greater Vancouver that tries to create "Town Centres" in the suburbs out of mostly highrises so that each can have have a walkable city centre (or two) of it's own. Unlike the old towers, new towers are aimed at those who are solidly middle class and they're very attractive with lots of amenities. People don't worry about them bringing in the bad element, and they get built in the suburbs because although huge numbers of condos get built in the downtown cores those condos are very expensive. People buy in the suburbs and commute to save money.

Last edited by BIMBAM; 03-15-2012 at 07:24 PM..
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