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Old 04-04-2012, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
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I've been wondering what is the technical term for a couple of different housing styles.

This one: 16 Trantor Place, New York, United States - Google Maps (the homes on the right if you're going north)

This one: 218 Charles Avenue, New York, United States - Google Maps
(A while back, I said that the style looks like something in a Rust Belt city)

This one: 309 South Avenue, New York, United States - Google Maps
(I thought the technical term was a duplex, but I looked it up, and it's something different. I've called them motel-type apartments, but there's got to be a better term. This style of housing is common in low-income areas in Miami. For instance: 3415 Plaza Street, Miami, Florida, United States - Google Maps and Northeast Miami Place No 2, Miami, Florida, United States - Google Maps)

This one: 120 Van Pelt Avenue, New York, United States - Google Maps
They're not really rowhouses. There's probably a better term for them because it doesn't seem as if they were intended to be attached. There are other homes in the area with that style that aren't attached, such as this one: 154 Morningstar Road, New York, United States - Google Maps
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:16 PM
 
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The Trantor Place one looks like a vernacular farmhouse, like the others around it, with what look like later additions--the enclosed porch on the front and the wing on the side. Not really any particular architectural style to it.

The Charles Avenue house looks like it has also had its porches enclosed--that bi front-gabled dormer is kind of out of proportion, the house form is kind of like a "foursquare" but narrower. Hard to nail down a particular style on that one either.

Not really much in the way of discernible style in that South Avenue apartment building either--a lot of buildings were designed by contractors who didn't give too much thought to style.

The Van Pelt houses I'd call row houses--row houses do not have to be attached. The one on the corner may have been commercial at some point. The cornice and corbels on the corner building give it a bit of Italianate look but there isn't really much in the way of particular style there either, other than it being a small example of a "two-part commercial" building.

Weird how the cornice is kind of "boxed" on the left-hand building, and in all of the photos of the last link. Haven't seen that before, maybe it's an east coast thing?
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Nomenclature is going to vary with locality. A row house in some areas will be called a townhouse in others. A Cape Cod in Cleveland is not the same thing as a Cape Cod in Cincinnati.

Is the Charles Avenue home a two-family? In some places, that would be called a duplex. In other places, a duplex is a semi-detached home.

In Philadelphia, a row house isn't a row house unless it's attached to its neighbors. A semi-detached house is called a twin.

Some of those houses, I'd call ugly.
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:18 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post

Some of those houses, I'd call ugly.
I don't really like any of them, either. The Charles Ave ones could be nice looking if they were landscaped better and the fences were removed.

While the OP said they looked like they could be from the rust belt, they don't look too out of place in New England. This street in eastern Massachusetts looks kinda similar, though some are two family:

119 Adams Street, Somerville, MA - Google Maps

kinda sorta, they look upstate NY ish the most to me.
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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All of them--with the exception of the motel/apartment building--would look better if their original details weren't covered with aluminum/vinyl siding.
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:52 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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So here are two more "motel-style" apartments in my area. Think they are close to the ones the OP showed.

west st northampton,ma - Google Maps

west st northampton,ma - Google Maps

Second one is a bit hard to see; it's to the right and a bit ahead but most of it is out of view. I like these much better:

Clark Avenue, Northampton, MA - Google Maps

well maintained looking, nice combination of density and greenery.
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Old 04-05-2012, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
The Trantor Place one looks like a vernacular farmhouse, like the others around it, with what look like later additions--the enclosed porch on the front and the wing on the side. Not really any particular architectural style to it.
Interesting. I never really thought of those as having enclosed porches. I mean, there are a lot of homes in the area built like that, and I wouldn't think that an enclosed porch would be part of the original design.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Is the Charles Avenue home a two-family? In some places, that would be called a duplex. In other places, a duplex is a semi-detached home.

In Philadelphia, a row house isn't a row house unless it's attached to its neighbors. A semi-detached house is called a twin.

Some of those houses, I'd call ugly.
I don't think the Charles Avenue homes were designed as two-families, but that area has a lot of doubling-up going on, so in practice, it might be a two-family.

In any case, I actually like the Trantor Place ones. I don't particularly care for the Charles Avenue style, but it looks alright. The Van Pelt Avenue, Morningstar Road, and South Avenue ones are just ones I pass by often and I was just curious about them. The South Avenue one I actually don't think is too bad asthetically, but I'll definitely agree with you over the first two.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I don't really like any of them, either. The Charles Ave ones could be nice looking if they were landscaped better and the fences were removed.

While the OP said they looked like they could be from the rust belt, they don't look too out of place in New England. This street in eastern Massachusetts looks kinda similar, though some are two family:

119 Adams Street, Somerville, MA - Google Maps

kinda sorta, they look upstate NY ish the most to me.
I always thought the area had more rowhouses. I mean, I always thought that the style would've originated in the Rust Belt because you see a lot of homes in cities like Buffalo, Cleveland and St. Louis that look like that. But I guess there's nothing saying that the style could've developed in two areas at once.
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Old 04-05-2012, 07:23 PM
 
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The Charles Avenue one is a Queen Anne, I believe -- similar to the ones on either side. But the porches have been covered so all the architectural detail is lost. Now it's just a box.
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
The Charles Avenue one is a Queen Anne, I believe -- similar to the ones on either side. But the porches have been covered so all the architectural detail is lost. Now it's just a box.
Makes sense.
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:42 PM
 
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Could be--the pillars are similar to the ones on the Queen Annes, but most likely none are original (Queen Annes generally had turned pillars, these look more like they were intended to mimic thicker, square Craftsman pillars.) The hipped roof kind of throws things, it looks more like the house two doors to the left, or the ones two houses to the right (although those lack that big projecting gabled dormer, with smaller hipped dormers instead.) Foursquares are generally lumped a little more in with Colonial Revival or Neoclassic, depending on details--a lot of foursquares were standard patterns that you could get with Colonial Revival, Classical Revival or even Craftsman details added to the same basic box.
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