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Old 05-06-2012, 01:27 PM
 
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I see some bad cases in Boston and New York. gentrification going to these places, and bad neighborhoods become expensive by having upscale condos built. while the pros are that the neighborhood are safer, the bad is that there are some hard working low income people that never did a crime, they are being forced out.

the thing is, where are people going to move to if they are being priced out? the suburbs? what if the suburbs are also expensive? move to another city?
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Old 05-06-2012, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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They're usually "herded" into housing projects. Which of course is the easy solution to a hard problem.
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Old 05-06-2012, 01:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
They're usually "herded" into housing projects. Which of course is the easy solution to a hard problem.


true, but isn't there a long wait list for that? I'm asking this question because i have a friend in NYC that knew a family that paid 1600 for a 1 bedroom apartment in brooklyn, while 6 people lived there, dad worked, mom stayed home to take care of 2 kids and her parents. they wound up moving to another cheaper city.
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Old 05-06-2012, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
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Quote:
Originally Posted by civic94 View Post
I see some bad cases in Boston and New York. gentrification going to these places, and bad neighborhoods become expensive by having upscale condos built. while the pros are that the neighborhood are safer, the bad is that there are some hard working low income people that never did a crime, they are being forced out.

the thing is, where are people going to move to if they are being priced out? the suburbs? what if the suburbs are also expensive? move to another city?
Well, in the case of the big Boston gentrification push that started around '98, most people either moved out to burbs like Framingham, Bedford, Burlington, etc. or they left Mass altogether. A lot of people went to Providence, or to New Hampshire.
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Old 05-06-2012, 01:59 PM
 
Location: where people are either too stupid to leave or too stuck to move
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they move to the next cheapest place until the area that they once lived is so expensive that the 1st wave of gentrifiers move to take their place again, and the cycle goes around and around until they are all priced out or something changes it.
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Old 05-06-2012, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
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Quote:
Originally Posted by civic94 View Post
true, but isn't there a long wait list for that? I'm asking this question because i have a friend in NYC that knew a family that paid 1600 for a 1 bedroom apartment in brooklyn, while 6 people lived there, dad worked, mom stayed home to take care of 2 kids and her parents. they wound up moving to another cheaper city.
Jeez, can't blame em. What a horrible situation to live in... but then, you see that quite a bit in big cities. NYC is probably the worst example, since it's the most expensive, but you see it too in LA - when I first moved here in '02, there was an apartment exactly like ours across the courtyard. Blinds were always drawn but I saw inside once; mother, father, three kids, grandma, uncle, aunt, two cousins, in a freakin' 750 sq ft. 1 bedroom. The father and uncle were gardeners, I think the mom and aunt were housekeepers but one was always at home to tend to the kids, the oldest of whom was a daughter who was in her teens. Felt bad for em; I'd order pizza for the kids some times... Rent there was only $700/mo at the time.

Public housing is impacted pretty heavily in most major cities. SF is horrible; the need for affordable housing drastically outpaces what's available, and it's really hands-off in terms of administration: once you're in, you're in, and you can go ahead and make way more than you're supposed to, no one will check (I have a friend who got into public housing when he couldn't find work some years earlier - fast forward and he was working from home successfully, had that place furnished like a Crate and Barrel showroom and had just bought a BMW 335ci. Three years after the fact, no one's checked up on his income). NYC has a lot more public housing blocks than SF or LA do, but then, it's also way more expensive.

A few years back in LA, they closed down the Mar Vista projects - evicted people who'd been there for decades, because it was during the real estate boom and some goons wanted to turn it into condos. The city was complicit in the matter... fast forward six years, the whole thing has become mired in red tape and lawsuits, and the projects are still there, with electricity going to them still, completely vacant. Kind of eerie to walk or drive through.

The West Coast cities seem to prefer Section 8 vouchers, where you basically get a monthly stipend to pay for rent at a private building, rather than outright building projects.
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Old 05-06-2012, 02:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
Blinds were always drawn but I saw inside once; mother, father, three kids, grandma, uncle, aunt, two cousins, in a freakin' 750 sq ft. 1 bedroom. The father and uncle were gardeners, I think the mom and aunt were housekeepers but one was always at home to tend to the kids, the oldest of whom was a daughter who was in her teens. Felt bad for em; I'd order pizza for the kids some times... Rent there was only $700/mo at the time.

10 people in a 1 bedroom place, I'm very sure that the parents of the 3 kids probably did not have any time to get it on. My uncle in boston rents a 350 sf studio for 1000 a month, with 2 kids. It didnt take too long for me to figure out the sex issue, dad gets home at nightime when the kids are home, and mom leaves with the kids to school, then goes to work after dropping them off.

if they get a 1 br place, it would cost 1300.
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Old 05-06-2012, 02:55 PM
 
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Many move to more affordable areas. Up here, we've had people from NYC and Newark move here. I know many people from NYC moved to other Upstate NY areas or to Pennsylvania. Some go Down South too.
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Old 05-06-2012, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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In many metro areas, they tend to move into the downward-trending first-ring suburbs. First-ring suburbs, after all, usually lack everything desirable on both ends. They usually don't interest modern suburbanites, because the houses are small and dated. And they don't interest gentrifiers, because the neighborhoods are built around car usage and lack easy access to city amenities.
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Old 05-06-2012, 08:15 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Many of the old timers in New York have rent stabilization. They're not directly displaced, per se. They just can't afford to get deferent apartment in the same neighborhood.

It's first- and second-generation gentrifiers who are displaced. They're not in poverty, they just can't afford the new rents.
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