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Old 06-06-2012, 09:25 AM
 
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The classic 1920's and 1930's style?

Of course the skeleton of these structures would be modern but will retain the classic exterior style.

I was thinking about Downtown LA, and felt that if I was in charge of adding density, I'd require that type of architecture in order to replace destroyed classic buildings. And art deco sky scrapers aswell would be nice.

Too many glass buildings is a sign that we lost sight of what real art it architecture is. Nice from afar but plain glass up close. And lets avoid the 70's and 80's box buildings.
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Old 06-06-2012, 09:29 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Wasn't deco revival kind of popular in the 80s?
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Old 06-06-2012, 09:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Wasn't deco revival kind of popular in the 80s?
IDK, all I know that came from that was tall rectangles with no definition whatsoever..
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Old 06-06-2012, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Naaah...I'm good with the steel and glass design of new urbanism.
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Old 06-06-2012, 06:14 PM
 
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only if its in the Miami style. I don't like the big standalone structures such as the Chrysler building.

Art deco still has a strong presence in Miami. And not just one or two standalone buildings. There are hundreds of these buildings in the city, designed to fit together to form entire cohesive neighborhoods that are mixed-use development patterned on traditional neighborhood design. Call it old urbanism or new urbanism, its all the same. Though of course one is heavily influenced by the other.












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Old 06-07-2012, 11:20 AM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,005,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicano3000X View Post
The classic 1920's and 1930's style?

Of course the skeleton of these structures would be modern but will retain the classic exterior style.

I was thinking about Downtown LA, and felt that if I was in charge of adding density, I'd require that type of architecture in order to replace destroyed classic buildings. And art deco sky scrapers as well would be nice.

Too many glass buildings is a sign that we lost sight of what real art in architecture is. Nice from afar but plain glass up close. And lets avoid the 70's and 80's box buildings.
Critics have been claiming we've "lost sight of what real art [is]" for as long as we've been calling anything art.

An interesting and cohesive neighborhood design is more important to me than any particular style.
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Old 06-10-2012, 04:28 PM
 
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They should bring back Art Deco definitely, but one thing I want them to use is the real materials they used for the old actual 1920 or 30s style architecture. Like if they used limestone, they should use that too for new buildings and not use glass or brutalist concrete style. However for every city though, they should focus on saving and restoring destroyed classic buildings rather than demolishing them and building something in their place, irregardless of whether or not it be modernist glass boxes or *new* Art Deco architecture.
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Old 06-10-2012, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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How could anyone not like the Chrysler building???
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Old 06-10-2012, 08:35 PM
 
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I'm not fond of very tall buildings. Looking up at them makes me queasy. The Chrysler's exterior also has a gray concrete brutalist appearance. And I detest concrete. It's supposedly made of brick (with a steel frame) but looks a lot more like concrete.
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Old 06-12-2012, 08:31 AM
 
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The downtown where I live has a lot of apartment buildings like the second to last--an Art Deco facade, 2-4 stories high, especially close to the state capitol, some seemingly inspired by some mid-height Art Deco state buildings constructed in the WPA era. I like them a lot--they represent an amicable density that doesn't overpower the single-family homes nearby, and they were built in order to facilitate having nearby housing for the state's workforce. Only a decade or two later, the balance of new development was spreading out to the suburbs and, instead of encouraging nearby apartments, the city started demolishing downtown housing. The decline of our downtown started shortly thereafter.
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