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Old 06-23-2012, 12:02 AM
 
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Not all cities are the same. There can still be huge variation in what certain cities have, their character, what they offer, and how they express it in all of their neighborhoods.

I would like to focus on the type of cities that have the most extreme differences within city limits, almost making it appear like a tale of two cities/two entirely different worlds in the same place.

I also would like to focus on cities that are opposite to that and have the most few differences within all the neighborhoods it has, being evenly distributed with the investment, character, and activity those type of cities have with it being rather similar in the entire city.

These are some cities that appear to have the most extreme differences in the neighborhoods it has (Based on investment/character/activity):

Chicago Illinois USA
Los Angeles California USA
San Francisco California USA
New York City USA
London UK/England
Paris France
Hong Kong China

These are some cities that appear to have the most few differences in the neighborhoods it has (Based on investment/character/activity):
Stockholm Sweden
Copenhagen Denmark
Amsterdam Netherlands
Vienna Austria
Tokyo Japan
Seoul South Korea
Singapore
Portland Oregon USA
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Old 06-23-2012, 12:04 AM
 
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There is a paradox involved with the most extreme and most few differences in all the neighborhoods cities have.

A city that has very few differences between the neighborhoods it has can easily still be a city with a lot of excitement, character, activity, and a wide variation of options for what someone can do there. It just means all the neighborhoods are rather similar with how they have that.

Also, cities with extreme differences between neighborhoods can sometimes be bad and conflicting, causing tension and mixed messages in that city.
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Old 06-23-2012, 12:41 AM
 
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I have never seen a city that was entirely homogenous in density or physical form...so, I'd say, all of them.
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Old 06-23-2012, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Well, they're all the same because they're all different.

You might want to work on that title, too. 'Most few differences'? Say what?
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Old 06-23-2012, 08:56 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,985 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Well, they're all the same because they're all different.

You might want to work on that title, too. 'Most few differences'? Say what?
Agreed! Cities, like suburbs, come in lots of different shapes and sizes. Agree about the title, too.
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Old 06-26-2012, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Los Angeles has some pretty wild fluctuations in its neighborhoods, maybe some of the most I've seen. Though I do agree every city has some variation to its neighborhoods.
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Old 07-03-2012, 06:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Well, they're all the same because they're all different.
That appears to be an excessive not proper generalization and a contradicting statement.

There is a difference between a proper adequate generalization vs. a not proper and excessive generalization.

I will say a proper adequate generalization right now that is more specific, with more value, and substance that I said earlier for part of this thread topic:

“Not all cities are the same. There can still be huge variation in what certain cities have, their character, what they offer, and how they express it in all of their neighborhoods.”

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
You might want to work on that title, too. 'Most few differences'? Say what?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Cities, like suburbs, come in lots of different shapes and sizes. Agree about the title, too.
I was writing a lot of posts with very limited time on that day when I wrote this thread topic.

It is very rare for me to have wording and grammar mistakes because my writing and the ideas I express is almost always perfect, impeccable, fascinating, and impressive.

I admit I could have worded the thread topic title a bit differently for two words such as “least differences” and not “most few differences.” Everyone is susceptible and vulnerable to wording and grammar mistakes happening at least a few times.

Why are you only focusing on the thread topic title? There was so much more to the thread topic and post than just that. Both of you did not have to attempt to ruin this thread topic just because of a small wording and grammar mistake.

Look at the other parts of this topic, and focus on the meaning, and value of it. Don't obsess over the most trivial and frivolous things.

Last edited by Thepastpresentandfuture; 07-03-2012 at 06:32 PM..
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Old 07-03-2012, 06:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
I have never seen a city that was entirely homogenous in density or physical form...so, I'd say, all of them.
You would say all of them for what?

It is true all cities/towns are not entirely homogenous in density and physical form but lots of cities/towns have a lot more variation/fluctuations/differences between all the neighborhoods it has compared to other cities/towns. That can happen to the extent where it can qualify for a thread topic such as this to be created with categorizing and observing certain places based on the thread topic question.

For one example, Chicago/Los Angeles/San Francisco/New York City/London/Paris/Hong Kong are some cities that appear to have the most extreme differences in the neighborhoods it has based on investment, character, and activity.

For the relative opposite, Stockholm/Copenhagen/Amsterdam/Vienna/Tokyo/Seoul/Singapore/Portland/ San Jose/Minneapolis are some cities that appear to have the least differences in the neighborhoods it has based on that.

There is a paradox involved with the most extreme and least fluctuations in all the neighborhoods cities have.

A city that has very few differences between the neighborhoods it has can easily still be a city with a lot of excitement, character, activity, and a wide variation of options for what someone can do there. It just means all the neighborhoods are rather similar with how they have that.

Also, cities with extreme differences/fluctuations between neighborhoods can sometimes be bad and conflicting, causing tension, and mixed messages in that city.

Last edited by Thepastpresentandfuture; 07-03-2012 at 06:35 PM..
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Old 07-03-2012, 06:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Los Angeles has some pretty wild fluctuations in its neighborhoods, maybe some of the most I've seen. Though I do agree every city has some variation to its neighborhoods.
Some cities/towns have so much more variation than others between all the neighborhoods it has. One example out of many possible examples is Los Angeles vs. Portland.

Los Angeles does have some of the most conspicuous fluctuations for any city. Chicago also appears to qualify for that and some other places too.

Portland is the opposite of that and has some of the least fluctuations between all the neighborhoods it has with plenty of other cities/towns that is similar with that too.
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Old 07-03-2012, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,364 posts, read 59,796,813 times
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Forgive me, Nei ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
That appears to be an excessive not proper generalization and a contradicting statement.
A little irony is good for your blood.

Quote:
Why are you only focusing on the thread topic title?
Because it was shorter than the actual post itself. Every city is going to have extreme differences in its neighborhoods. It's not a topic that merits much discussion because the answer will always be ... yes.

Have you actually been to any of those cities you listed?
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