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Old 07-05-2012, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
I thought Santa Monica was always very wealthy and some of the best of the Los Angeles area for at least 60 years. I had similar opinions for my impressions with the Hollywood neighborhood too such as being a higher density version of Beverly Hills.

The Historic Core seems like a good place to see in Los Angeles.

I am curious what was Culver City, Silver Lake, Inglewood, Van Nuys, and Northridge neighborhoods state of existence over time in the last 20 to 30 years in the Los Angeles area?
I know that Culver City, Silver Lake and Inglewood were not great areas 20-30 years ago. Silver Lake was like Echo Park, a lot of gang-activity and pretty low-income. Obviously now it is one of the "hip" neighborhoods in the city and is very trendy.

I believe the same for Culver City and Inglewood. Culver City just got a station in the Metro system, and it has a lot of trendy restaurants in its little "mini-downtown". It also has a little arts district that mostly has boutique furniture stores, the Helms District. Inglewood has some depressed areas still, though I believe it has improved from a low point in the 80s-90s. The Crenshaw Corridor LRT line might help be a boost to the area. Also the Madison Square Garden group has bought the Forum and will make upgrades, so that could also be a positive.

Van Nuys and Northridge are sort of deteriorating and have seen an increase in gangs. I don't know a lot about either of them, though Van Nuys is sort of the governmental "capital" of the San Fernando Valley. Other than possibly having a light rail line run down Van Nuys Blvd, I don't see much that will spark Van Nuys in a positive way in the near future.

Both Northridge and Van Nuys cover huge swaths of land, so there are still some very nice parts of both neighborhoods.
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Old 07-05-2012, 06:01 PM
 
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North and Clybourn in Chicago. It used to be a neighborhood you'd be scared to be anytime of the day and now it is trendy where many want to live. Also Bucktown. The "West Loop" north of Greektown. Some neighborhoods to the west may be gentrifying soon.
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Old 07-05-2012, 06:27 PM
 
2,881 posts, read 4,617,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
I thought Santa Monica was always very wealthy and some of the best of the Los Angeles area for at least 60 years. I had similar opinions for my impressions with the Hollywood neighborhood too such as being a higher density version of Beverly Hills.

The Historic Core seems like a good place to see in Los Angeles.

I am curious what was Culver City, Silver Lake, Inglewood, Van Nuys, and Northridge neighborhoods state of existence over time in the last 20 to 30 years in the Los Angeles area?
Santa Monica was always pleasant. It was a sleepy, li'l bit funky beach town with a mix of bohemians and longtime residents. It wasn't "nice" until 3rd Street Promenade opened in '89. Then it changed rapidly to an upscale place. That's just over 20 years. I'd go study at the old Santa Monica mall in the early '80s, sitting on the concrete planters. Man, it was a true escape. Westwood was the place to go for fun, not SM.

Venice was the hood. It certainly carries an alternative legacy from the '50s and '60s, a dark hippie Doors-y vibe. Artists have always been drawn there. It was also a really bad ghetto into the '90s. A certain something might still persist in the atmosphere but Venice isn't the same, not that I'm judging one way or the other. It's a place and places change.
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Old 07-05-2012, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Cheswolde
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Default Harlem

I am originally from Europe and grew up there at a time when many countries were far more homogeneous than they are today and when succession -- the sociologists' term for economic and ethnic change -- was a far rarer phenomenon than today. That's why my first encounter with the U.S. in 1964 was such a startling experience.

For reasons that are too complicated to discuss here, I gravitated to Harlem, where I realized that sucession is an integral part of American life.

Harlem started as a Native American village. Then came Dutch and British colonial periods. By the 1870s, it was a village that attracted well-to-do American born whites. Then development began at the earnest, and the subway came. A number of European immigrant groups moved to Harlem, and Oscar Hammerstein II's father bankrolled several schemes there to turn Harlem into the entertainment capital of Manhattan. Think about it, he built what today is the Apollo!

After the 1910s, white abandonment began with the results that Harlem soon became black and Puerto Rican. And since the 1980s, whites have been returning at an accelerating rate.

There are many books about Harlem, the most famous being Gilbert Osofsky's 1971 Harlem: The Making of a Ghetto. Antero Pietila's 2010 Not in My Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City is mostly about succession in Baltimore, but begins in Harlem. He also discusses how one of the consequences of the subprime financing craze was that banks' liberal terms enable whites to get loans in places like Harlem, where loans previously had been difficult to obtain.

This is an all-American phenomenon. You can find historical and contemporary examples in all cities. The most extreme examples in many cities are from the period after 1954 when school desegregation and white suburbanization led to panic in neighborhoods which changed color almost overnight.

Now to the OP's formulation. Urban renewal is a post-World War II phenomenon as a federal initiative. But Pietila's chronicles how Baltimore in the 1910s launched what must have been America's first government-sponsored Negro removal project near City Hall and the courthouse. Copying a London condemnation ordinance, Mayor Preston demolished an entire mixed-race neighborhood in the city that in 1910 had promulgated America's first residential segregation law.

Last edited by barante; 07-05-2012 at 07:05 PM..
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Old 07-06-2012, 05:00 AM
 
Location: Cheswolde
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Default Here is the latest Harlem book

If you have a basic interest in New York City, you need to read this book about Harlem's transformation over the past four hundred years. http://www.amazon.com/Harlem-Hundred...=Jonathan+Gill

I found it fascinating, even though it could have benefited from much tighter editing.

I would also call attention to the transformation that is occurring near Oakland, California, where so many African Americans have moved to surrounding counties -- thanks to the subprime craze -- that blacks account to one third of the population in that once majority-black city. Pietila touches on the resulting tensions in his book, http://www.amazon.com/Not-My-Neighbo...pr_product_top

Of course, examples of gentrification abound throughout the country. Another example is Washington, D.C., where Anacostia is about the only area that has escaped gentrification. One spectacular transition -- considering the low point -- is the U Street corridor. But as nearby Adams Morgan demonstrates, the process takes time. Adams Morgan also demonstrates that "gentrification" may involve different nationalities (in this case Hispanics) and even social classes that may not be that gentry.

Another area in the throes of this process in D.C. is LeDroit Park, the historic African-American elite enclave near Howard .University that was largely abandoned by blacks and now is coming back as a multiracial, multicultural neighborhood.

Last edited by barante; 07-06-2012 at 05:22 AM..
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Old 07-06-2012, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Boston
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I suspect there are many neighborhoods that have done this in either direction, and quite a few that have done both. My neighborhood in Boston (Roslindale) over the course of 40 years went from being one of the most desirable, to being a literally burnt out zone of drug pushers and prostitutes, to now being a desirable location for families. 40 years to crash and burn, rebirth, and thrive.

In the sixties, the neighborhood boasted a thriving commercial district with small to medium department stores, a movie theater, and a number of other interesting features. Then came busing, a suburban mall a few miles to the South, and the people left and the stores closed. Then there was a wave of arson as landlords tried to recoup their losses through insurance scams. As a final indignity, the transit authority announced plans to close the rail line that came through the neighborhood.

Then residents began to organize, and with help from the local city counselor, Tom Menino (now the Mayor), the neighborhood secured the first urban federal Main Streets designation. Money became available to rebuild the store fronts, a few large anchor tenants arrived, activists managed to reverse the decision on the train station, a farmers' market was established, and urban pioneers looking for an affordable place in the city moved in. The movie theater is gone, but the commercial streets are again teaming with active storefronts, and Roslindale has become known as a major destination for foodies. We have 7 bakeries, a handful of specialty food shops, and dozens of top rated restaurants. Often it only takes a few pushes to change the direction of a neighborhood.
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Old 07-06-2012, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Cheswolde
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Default More about Boston

As I pointed out in previous posts, the phenomenon of succession has been with us for a long time. What is different in our times is that neighborhoods once deemed to be doomed -- because of the decrepit housing stock or the socioeconomic and racial characteristics of residents -- now are coming back. And I truly think that the subprime practices, whatever the excesses, helped break a previous taboo -- that once a neighborhood began going black, whites should not be given loans to buy in them.

As Pietila points out in Not in My Neighborhood, this was the credo of the Home Owners' Loan Corporation, the New Deal bailout agency. It redlined 239 American cities, dividing neighborhoods into four color categories depending on the age and condition of the housing stock and the characteristics of residents. The top two rankings were given to Christian neighborhoods where the housing stock was modern; where restrictive covenants banned "inharmonious elements," such as blacks and Jews, and where residents were well-off. Such neighborhoods, HOLC told lenders, were good risks even in the middle of the Great Depression.

Of the two remaining color categories, one denoted "transitional" neighborhoods. They were characterized by older housing; were populated by a mixture of white groups, but did not have the requisite restrictive covenants to "protect" them. The fate of those neighborhoods, HOLC said, was to become RED, or redlined. HOLC told lenders that if any loans were made in those areas which it called "dangerous," they would have to be done on a basis and terms different from those used in the top-rated neighborhoods.

This mapping between 1935 and 1937 is when the federal government gave its imprimatur to a two-tier lending system -- one for well-to-do whites; the other for minorities -- that eventually led to subprime.

Much of core Baltimore was thus redlined. During the Depression and even after World War II it kept deteriorating for the lack of reinvestment because it was seen as doomed. The same happened in many other cities. It is noteworthy that aside from blacks, HOLC also felt that unassimilated white immigrants were a deteriorating force in neighborhoods, although documents show that appraisers praised East Baltimore rowhouses which were occupied by Poles and where marble steps were scrubbed every week in a competition among women. Neverthelss, such blocks also were redlined. One report said that its good featured were canceled by "Negro and Italian infiltration."

The succession phenomenon has been only partially documented and researched. The focus often has been on racial change after 1954. Among such books are two excellent books about Boston, including Gerald Gamm's Why the Jews Left Boston and the Catholics Stayed (1999). The other is The Death of an American Jewish Community by Harmon and someone else.

As the previous poster pointed out, some unlikely neighborhoods have come back in Boston. Similarly, several redlined neighborhoods (which never went black, though) are now among desired Baltimore neighborhoods, including Bolton Hill, Mount Vernon, Federal Hill and Canton, the latter two benefitting from their proximity to the harbor.

Last edited by barante; 07-06-2012 at 09:15 AM..
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Old 07-06-2012, 11:27 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
I had similar opinions for my impressions with the Hollywood neighborhood too such as being a higher density version of Beverly Hills?
This helps keep a neighborhood ungentrified:


Sublime - April 29, 1992 (Rodney King riots) - YouTube
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Old 07-06-2012, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
This helps keep a neighborhood ungentrified:


Sublime - April 29, 1992 (Rodney King riots) - YouTube
The funny thing is, in some ways the riots helped gentrification. A great number of the buildings that burned up were on their last legs, and often condemned. This was the low-point (or high-water mark) in LA's white-flight, so the inner city was pretty bombed out and abandoned to begin with. Obviously this was not the cause of gentrification in Hollywood and Koreatown, but having a fresh palette to work with helped and sped up some of the revitalization (too bad it happened in to 90s and so many strip malls got built!).

Koreatown was pretty much gutted in the riots, so it's gentrification has been pretty rapid. While not completely Williamsburgh-style gentrified, it is a significantly more welcoming place to live.
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Old 07-06-2012, 11:49 AM
 
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Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Koreatown was pretty much gutted in the riots, so it's gentrification has been pretty rapid. While not completely Williamsburgh-style gentrified, it is a significantly more welcoming place to live.
Is it still largely Korean?
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