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Old 06-23-2012, 12:19 AM
 
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The time frame for changing rapidly is within 5 to 15 years.

Other than going into specifics for those neighborhoods, this is also about other neighborhoods that stayed the same/similar for a long time and didn't get easily influenced.
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Old 06-23-2012, 12:39 AM
 
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Not really sure what you're asking for here...case studies? Examples? Just a list of neighborhoods?
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Old 06-23-2012, 11:13 AM
 
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Hollywood has certainly changed fast. We moved there in the mid-2000s and saw it change even in the few years we were there. And we were there after it had already significantly gentrified. Since then it has changed even more.

I can think of any number of neighborhoods in my old city of Minneapolis that have basically stayed the same for decades. Others (like the Mill District downtown) have dramatically grown -- in that case a ton of new condos and apartments and businesses and cultural destinations (museum, theater, etc.) in an area that was once mostly industrial and old mill ruins. There are also a number of Minneapolis neighborhoods that have drastically changed in character within a ten year time period thanks to a big influx in immigration. Cedar-Riverside is now sometimes called Little Somalia, and many of the neighborhoods along East Lake Street now sport blocks of businesses catering to Hispanic residents. They've really breathed some new life into that street. Whittier neighborhood was pretty sketchy 20 years ago; these days it still has some crime issues, but thanks also to a combination of immigrants and hipsters is actually a pretty happening (and still affordable) place.
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Old 06-23-2012, 02:43 PM
 
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"Urban renewal/gentrification" seems like a very odd pairing to me. The two are completely unrelated, why are they combined here?
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Old 06-23-2012, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
Hollywood has certainly changed fast. We moved there in the mid-2000s and saw it change even in the few years we were there. And we were there after it had already significantly gentrified. Since then it has changed even more.

I can think of any number of neighborhoods in my old city of Minneapolis that have basically stayed the same for decades. Others (like the Mill District downtown) have dramatically grown -- in that case a ton of new condos and apartments and businesses and cultural destinations (museum, theater, etc.) in an area that was once mostly industrial and old mill ruins. There are also a number of Minneapolis neighborhoods that have drastically changed in character within a ten year time period thanks to a big influx in immigration. Cedar-Riverside is now sometimes called Little Somalia, and many of the neighborhoods along East Lake Street now sport blocks of businesses catering to Hispanic residents. They've really breathed some new life into that street. Whittier neighborhood was pretty sketchy 20 years ago; these days it still has some crime issues, but thanks also to a combination of immigrants and hipsters is actually a pretty happening (and still affordable) place.
From 1995 to 2010 Hollywood is probably one of the most changed neighborhoods in the US. Adding heavy rail was probably a huge factor.
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Old 06-24-2012, 08:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
From 1995 to 2010 Hollywood is probably one of the most changed neighborhoods in the US. Adding heavy rail was probably a huge factor.
I can attest that the changes made it a pleasure to sell our Hollywood condo in 2003. Among other things - H&H, the renovation of the El Capitan, Egyptian theaters, which reflected a growing desirability for people to relocate into an area which still wasn't WeHo& BevHills expensive, but had alot more going for it than say pre 1999. I like to drive through that neighborhood to see the ongoing revitilization!
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Old 06-28-2012, 09:32 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
Hollywood has certainly changed fast. We moved there in the mid-2000s and saw it change even in the few years we were there. And we were there after it had already significantly gentrified. Since then it has changed even more.

I can think of any number of neighborhoods in my old city of Minneapolis that have basically stayed the same for decades. Others (like the Mill District downtown) have dramatically grown -- in that case a ton of new condos and apartments and businesses and cultural destinations (museum, theater, etc.) in an area that was once mostly industrial and old mill ruins. There are also a number of Minneapolis neighborhoods that have drastically changed in character within a ten year time period thanks to a big influx in immigration. Cedar-Riverside is now sometimes called Little Somalia, and many of the neighborhoods along East Lake Street now sport blocks of businesses catering to Hispanic residents. They've really breathed some new life into that street. Whittier neighborhood was pretty sketchy 20 years ago; these days it still has some crime issues, but thanks also to a combination of immigrants and hipsters is actually a pretty happening (and still affordable) place.
I thought before Hollywood was always an upscale, high-income neighborhood that expressed it similarly for a long time, so that is news to me.

My current guess is Hollywood might have changed in density levels, business/commercial store activity, public transportation friendliness, and integration of residents from other parts of Los Angeles metro at least visiting that area easily and being able to live there more easily.

What are your opinions for Santa Monica and Venice Beach neighborhoods state of existence over time?

My impressions is that Santa Monica and Venice Beach might be some neighborhoods in the Los Angeles metro area that stayed the same/similar for a long time and didn't get easily influenced in the past 4 to 6 decades.

Minneapolis did appear to me to have a lot of neighborhoods that stayed the same/similar for a long time and didnít get easily influenced. However, it was inevitable for Minneapolis to have at least a few neighborhoods change drastically because of all the economic growth, and increased diversity Minneapolis had for the past 10 to 20 years.

That is interesting and fun that you experienced living in both Minneapolis and Los Angeles, quite different cities at least based on first impressions, their regional location, and outside scenery. Both Minneapolis and Los Angeles have their benefits/pros and cons.

In the USA, I lived in both Seattle and New York City.
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Old 06-28-2012, 09:35 AM
 
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For Seattle, it appears that a lot of neighborhoods stayed the same/similar for a relatively long time such as Capital Hill, University District, Fremont, Queen Anne, and West Seattle.

However, some neighborhoods there did still have rapid substantial changes not that many years ago. One example is Downtown from the 1980s to 1990s where it received a lot of new investment, high rises, and increased density to the extent where it changed many people’s opinions about Seattle between the 1980s to 1990s.

Ballard might have rapid changes some people say, but I would say they are exaggerating those claims for Ballard.

For New York City, the East Village certainly changed so much between the 1990s to 2000s because of urban revitalization/gentrification/renewal where it went from a ghetto neighborhood to avoid to an extremely desirable neighborhood.

For the South Bronx it expressed substantial changes in the opposite direction from the East Village. The South Bronx actually used to be very middle class, a bit upscale, and not bad in the 1950/1960s. From the 1960s to 1970s/1980s/1990s it went downhill for the South Bronx because of urban neglect/decay. In the 1990s to 2000s the neighborhoods in the South Bronx (Fordham, Tremont, Morisannia, etc.) had noticeable improvements, but it is still a ghetto not desirable area and needs more investment and change of character.
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Old 06-28-2012, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
I thought before Hollywood was always an upscale, high-income neighborhood that expressed it similarly for a long time, so that is news to me.

My current guess is Hollywood might have changed in density levels, business/commercial store activity, public transportation friendliness, and integration of residents from other parts of Los Angeles metro at least visiting that area easily and being able to live there more easily.
Hollywood hit its nadir in the mid 90s after decades of free-fall. It sounds like Uptown Urbanist moved there in the early to mid 00s, when change was beginning (Hollywood/Highland Center, Red Line subway). Hollywood has always been one of the more dense neighborhoods in Los Angeles - the building I live in was built in the 20s and has 120 units and many of the surrounding buildings are from that time period. The wave of gentrification is starting to spread outwards towards East Hollywood as well.

I'm not an expert on Santa Monica, but I believe it too has gentrified pretty significantly (well past the level that Hollywood is at - many would say SM over-gentrified).

Another Los Angeles neighborhood that has seen rapid improvement is the Historic Core (bounded by Olive St, Los Angeles St, 1st St, 9th St). This can be credited to the adapt reuse policies in the neighborhood that let old warehouse and office building be converted into apartments and lofts. The reduction of LAs ludicrous parking minimums also made "redevelopment" (more accurately, reuse) much easier to accomplish.
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Old 07-03-2012, 06:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Hollywood hit its nadir in the mid 90s after decades of free-fall. It sounds like Uptown Urbanist moved there in the early to mid 00s, when change was beginning (Hollywood/Highland Center, Red Line subway). Hollywood has always been one of the more dense neighborhoods in Los Angeles - the building I live in was built in the 20s and has 120 units and many of the surrounding buildings are from that time period. The wave of gentrification is starting to spread outwards towards East Hollywood as well.

I'm not an expert on Santa Monica, but I believe it too has gentrified pretty significantly (well past the level that Hollywood is at - many would say SM over-gentrified).

Another Los Angeles neighborhood that has seen rapid improvement is the Historic Core (bounded by Olive St, Los Angeles St, 1st St, 9th St). This can be credited to the adapt reuse policies in the neighborhood that let old warehouse and office building be converted into apartments and lofts. The reduction of LAs ludicrous parking minimums also made "redevelopment" (more accurately, reuse) much easier to accomplish.
I thought Santa Monica was always very wealthy and some of the best of the Los Angeles area for at least 60 years. I had similar opinions for my impressions with the Hollywood neighborhood too such as being a higher density version of Beverly Hills.

The Historic Core seems like a good place to see in Los Angeles.

I am curious what was Culver City, Silver Lake, Inglewood, Van Nuys, and Northridge neighborhoods state of existence over time in the last 20 to 30 years in the Los Angeles area?

Last edited by Thepastpresentandfuture; 07-03-2012 at 06:38 PM..
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