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Old 08-01-2012, 06:08 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,888,606 times
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I noticed in the biggest city near me (45,000 population) that most of the development is suburban development. More suburban homes on the southwest and southest part of town (technically sprawl) are being developed. Also, there are plans for the city to work with the county government to annex an old ranch into the city to build a 500,000 sq. ft. lifestyle center-big box center combo.

Also, I can't help but read about Wal-Mart Markets and Grocery Outlet opening new stores. And also plans for new Wal-Mart stores.

On a side note, some things I notice to be in urban areas are:
-larger high schools (1,800+students)
-one concentrated poor area
-concentration of homeless
-concentration of upper middle class and middle class or middle class and working class
-Various religious groups
-Regional serving amenities (airports, car dealerships, colleges, malls, regional big box stores)
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:13 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,098,346 times
Reputation: 3117
Most of the west was settled after the invention of the car.

/the end
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:44 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,888,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Most of the west was settled after the invention of the car.

/the end
I guess because ppl like houses and the ease of using the car.

I never hear of urban communities being built. I mean, I think of Orange County, and gated communities and planned suburban communities for families.
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Old 08-01-2012, 09:00 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,410,475 times
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The West has plenty of urban infill projects. No idea about your specific city, but it could just be that you don't notice the new projects within existing urban areas because they are more likely to be smaller in scale. Instead of an entire new subdivision and shopping center, for example, it's new multi-use buildings scattered across a neighborhood or the city.
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:34 AM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,558,119 times
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Do you actually read any sites or blogs having to do with urban development or architecture, the city? Urban communities build things all the time, from individual infill sites to whole neighborhoods, all over the country and the world. And even more important is the repair and rehabilitation of existing cities.

You probably see more suburban development where you live because there is more cheap greenfield to build on, and the economics of sprawl favor building cheap things--like suburbs.

And remember, the car is pretty useless without roads--the roads came first, and it wasn't due to consumer choice.
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Old 08-02-2012, 07:17 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,098,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
I guess because ppl like houses and the ease of using the car.
.
Whether they like it is irrelevant. It was already the norm when hordes started moving to California. Of course the built environment is going to incorporate the popular technology of the times.

If you rented an apartment, you wouldn't expect to have a telegraph in it, right? No, you'd expect wireless internet.

Contrast that to the eastern cities, which were populated before the invention of the auto, and there is a reason as to why they are more dense and "urban."

Once again though, you've lost me on all the talk of stores.
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Old 08-02-2012, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,917,166 times
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Two things to consider.

1. Local zoning, even in "cities" may prohibit urban development, through things like setbacks, height requirements, parking requirements, etc.

2. High-density construction is, generally speaking, more expensive to build than single-family housing. Therefore it only really makes sense to build in areas where property values are high, as well as demand.
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Old 08-02-2012, 08:57 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
I guess because ppl like houses and the ease of using the car.

I never hear of urban communities being built. I mean, I think of Orange County, and gated communities and planned suburban communities for families.
I'm not sure what you're getting at. Most housing developments built these days in my part of the west (metro Denver) are built with parks, trails, land available for future retail (there do have to be customers before the retail can go in), land available for future schools (again, there have to be students before the school get built). Generally, these days, apartment and condo buildings are included in the housing mix.
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,070,870 times
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I'm confused. Your idea of urban building is being able to walk to Wal-Mart?
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:23 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
I'm confused. Your idea of urban building is being able to walk to Wal-Mart?
Who are you addressing this to?
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