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Old 11-29-2012, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Waterloo, ON
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Maybe most of those duplexes and triplexes in Montreal were built more around 1945-1950 and 1920-1930 rather than 1930-1945, I'm not entirely sure. However, the housing built right after WWII was definitely much less single family than in the US.

Here's a couple aerial photos of the area around Cote des Neiges (they're inverted, so South is up)
1930


1952


from
URBANPHOTO: Cities / People / Place Montreal from Above, 1930


You can tell that certain areas looked new, with what looks like streets under construction and no trees, the light colour and treelessness is similar to aerials of suburban development today.

It looks like development of Outremont in the bottom left of the 1930 photo was just wrapping up. This is the area today:
Cote-des-Neiges-Notre-Dame-de-Grace, Montreal, QC - Google Maps

However, Cote des Neiges looks like it was very new in 1952, this is the area today, it's mostly dominated by apartment buildings, this is the part of Montreal with the most high density along with downtown and Parc Extension. The older Plateau Mont Royal is denser at the neighbourhood level, but it's consistently high density, whereas Cote des Neiges is a mix of medium and very high density.
Cote-des-Neiges-Notre-Dame-de-Grace, Montreal, QC - Google Maps

The Southern part of Notre Dame des Graces was also brand new, although there are single family homes, it's mostly multifamily buildings: Cote-des-Neiges-Notre-Dame-de-Grace, Montreal, QC - Google Maps

Cote Saint Luc wasn't even developed by 1950, it has a lot of the 1950s/1960s style plexes common in Saint-Leonard and Lasalle (I'll just call them Saint-Leonard style homes from now on), large apartment buildings and single family homes:
Cote-des-Neiges-Notre-Dame-de-Grace, Montreal, QC - Google Maps

Snowdon looks like it was a little older than Cote des Neiges, although still built after 1930: Cote-des-Neiges-Notre-Dame-de-Grace, Montreal, QC - Google Maps

Mount Royal, the area with the diagonal streets looks like it was just starting to develop in 1930, but was largely built out by 1952. It was designed as a wealthy railroad suburb, with service beginning in 1917. It has a population of 1800 in 1925, 6,915 in 1948 and 21,282 in 1961. It looks like development came slowly with the start of rail service, and since the photo shows it largely built by 1952, it looks like about 2/3 of it was built from 1948-1952. It's mostly single family homes but there is a significant cluster of 3-4 storey apartments in the middle.
Mont-Royal, QC - Google Maps

Last edited by memph; 11-29-2012 at 08:09 AM..
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Old 11-29-2012, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Waterloo, ON
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The densest neighbourhood built mostly after WWII is Parc Extension. It is also the densest neighbourhood in Montreal with 30,000 residents and a density of 50,000 ppsm. I believe it was mostly built in the 1950s.
Parc Extension, Montreal, QC - Google Maps

Other than Parc Extension, I think the densest neighbourhoods built after WWII are Saint Michel, and the Eastern/Northern part of Montreal-Nord, both of which have a relatively similar built form.
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Old 11-29-2012, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Waterloo, ON
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AFAIK, the first neighbourhood of Toronto that was designed with the car in mind was The Kingsway, with its homes built mostly from 1924-1947. The automobile was mostly accessible to just the upper classes at the time, so it was a fairly exclusive British style garden suburb. The garages are separate from the house, and located in the back, but accessed without a laneway, and the neighbourhood has curving streets with detached single family homes on relatively large lots (for Toronto).
The Kingsway, Toronto, ON - Google Maps

Even less wealthy areas from that time period in Toronto had mostly single family detached and semi detached homes, these were mostly streetcar suburbs, like in Montreal, but still considerably less dense.

New Toronto was a pretty middle class waterfront streetcar suburb.
The Kingsway, Toronto, ON - Google Maps

Fairbank was even less wealthy, it was working class, but even so, it's mostly dominated by single family homes on narrow lots. Fairbank is denser than The Kingsway and New Toronto, but still noticeably lower density than Montreal neighbourhoods from that time, like Villeray, or older Toronto neighbourhoods.
Fairbank, Toronto, ON - Google Maps

In the mid-19th century, the neighbourhoods being built in Toronto were largely rowhouse dominated, except for the upper class areas, in the late 19th century, you had a bit more semi detached homes, and in the period just before WWI, it was mostly 2-3 storey semi detached and detached homes on narrow lots.
Early 20th century neighbourhood: http://goo.gl/maps/IodJq

In terms of the building stock in Toronto, I would say it was a gradual transition from the most common housing type being rowhouses in 1850, to semi detached homes in 1880, to 2-3 storey detached homes in 1900-1910, to narrow lot bungalows in 1940 to larger lot bungalows in 1960, and then 2 storey midsized and even narrow lot detached, as well as semi detached and townhouses starting to make a return in the 70s.

The street grid was also not abandonned quite in 1945, it persisted in Toronto for about a decade after WWII. The era of the shopping mall didn't begin right after WWII either, in Toronto, it only really began when Yorkdale Shopping Mall opened in 1964 and really took off in the 1970s. Between 1945 and 1964, in Toronto at least, the early post-war suburbs had strip malls with neighbourhood oriented businesses, but if you wanted to go shopping, you still went to the department stores downtown. Even the strip mall didn't begin right after WWII, you had a transition period from about 1925-1950 where both strip malls and street fronting retail was being built.

Last edited by memph; 11-29-2012 at 09:38 AM..
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Old 11-29-2012, 12:14 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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I'm not familiar with Canadian development patterns (aside from a brief visit to Toronto), but the general topic about the "break" is a fascinating one to me, and one I've studied somewhat in the US cities I lived in.


Some great comments here (particularly Eddyline's remarks about compression and the dramatic "change" one saw after WWII, and the OPs comment about starting the study period around 1920, which is where one would start to see the imapct of mass automobility).
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Old 11-29-2012, 12:18 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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Quote:
The street grid was also not abandonned quite in 1945, it persisted in Toronto for about a decade after WWII.
These areas may have been subdivided prior to WWII.

That is what happend in Chicago & its suburbs. So much land was sudivided prior to the Great Depression that the 1940s and 1950s was pretty much a decade of "infill" on pre-existing street systems, but these grid block neighborhoods were replatted to larger lot sizes (example is the Chicago suburb of Skokie)...so you have blocks of postwar "ranch houses" on larger lots with the occastional drastically different style house on a smaller lot, from the pre WWII scattered among the postwar houses.
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Old 11-29-2012, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Interesting thread, though I find it hard to get exact dates on when a neighborhood was built.
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Old 11-29-2012, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Waterloo, ON
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This link provides information on most of Toronto's (city proper) neighbourhoods: Toronto Neighbourhood Map and GTA Map

According to it, these little bungalows (similar to those of Chicago's bungalow belt) in the neighbourhood of Glen Park were built mostly in the late 40s. Briar Hill - Belgravia, Toronto, ON - Google Maps

The first homes built after WWII in Toronto, referred to as veterans housing or victory homes were mostly built in the last 40s and are quite small. Only about 30,000 of these were built across Canada by Wartime Housing Ltd, not nearly enough to house the 1 million or so veterans. Here are some pictures of veterans housing in Windsor, the homes in Toronto are basically the same.



Victory Housing | International Metropolis

There were also a lot of house plans sold by Canada's "Central Housing and Mortgage Corporation", in addition to the veterans housing built by their predecessors. I think houses like these were based off those house plans, or at least they were some sort of catalogue housing.
Oakridge, Toronto, ON - Google Maps

The first truly large scale master planned neighbourhood built by a single developer was Don Mills, which was built from 1953 to 1965, that means Toronto (current city limits) grew by about 300,000 people between the start of WWII and the start of the construction of Don Mills, so there would have been a fair bit of smaller scale development after WWII. It seems like a lot of the suburbia still being built in US cities is relatively small developments, unlike in Canada (especially Toronto, Ottawa, Edmonton and Calgary) where there are master planned developments of thousands of homes.

DaytonSux could be right about why the streetgrid was still existant in developments for about a decade after WWII, I don't know when the land was subdivided, mostly just roughly when the homes were built.
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Old 11-30-2012, 09:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
I've heard this style referred to as "match box homes" The Bridle Path, Toronto, ON - Google Maps
Looks a lot like the neighborhood of the McKenzie brothers in Strange Brew.
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Old 12-01-2012, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Waterloo, ON
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Montreal's real estate listings often have the year the home was built, so looking up homes that are typical of a neighbourhood, you can get an idea of when certain areas were urbanized.

Here's when certain areas seem to have been built

18th Century?? Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
These buildings are from the 1860s, area is probably 18th century: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
1875: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
Late 19th C? Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
1890?: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
1900: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
1900s: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
1910s: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
1920s: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
1937: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps (but very little was built from 1931 to 1944)
Late 40s: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
Early 50s: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
Late 50s: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
Early 60s: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps
Late 60s: Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps

Looks like little remains of pre 1880 Montreal, aside from the Old Port. I would estimate that Montreal was only about 5 square miles in 1900, with a population of 260,000. In 1880, the population was only 140,000, so maybe the city was 2-3 square miles, and in 1870, 105,000, so maybe 2 square miles? That's basically the combined size of the Old Port+Downtown, so probably much of the 19th century city was demolished for 20th century downtown developments, including neo-classical buildings around the turn of the century, and then of course post-WWII modernism.

This shows the SW part of Montreal's port in 1920, not much of it is left today except the top left corner.
Aerial View of Montreal Old Port

The area today:
Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, Montreal, QC - Google Maps

The area that was largely demolished/redeveloped was where Irish immigrants settled, starting around 1825. The 1880 to 1940 era saw a lot of expansion with the arrival of streetcars, before that, you had the overcrowded and polluted city, typical of most other North American cities.



http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_kPwFvUVenp...%5B1946%5D.jpg
The upper part of this picture from 1946 shows the crowded pre-streetcar city, the lower part of the picture was I think an English neighbourhood from after 1880. According to wiki, horsecars started to operate in 1861, and electric streetcars in 1892. This was undoubtedly a good thing at the time, the pre-streetcar city looks far more crowded than, say, the Plateau-Mont-Royal neighbourhood built from 1880-1910 mostly, a neighbourhood that's currently one of the densest in Montreal, comparable to Boston's Back Bay or South End or Philadelphia's Southside.

The redevelopment of 19th century Montreal meant that this area is mostly not that dense today, in terms of population density (employment density is high in some areas). Areas from 1910 to 1930 are about as dense as those from 1880-1910, or barely less dense, and then density seems to pick up a bit from 1945 to 1955. From 1955 to 1970, density in the Francophone and immigrant (ex Italian) areas does drop, but remains comparable Toronto neighbourhoods built from 1910 to 1940. Only the anglophone areas built after 1950 or so have significantly lower densities, comparable to neighbourhoods of Toronto from the same period. Only around 1970 does the density of all new developments drop to levels comparable to areas of Toronto of the same time period and before too long, Toronto densities for new development become higher.

Last edited by memph; 12-01-2012 at 01:09 PM..
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Old 12-01-2012, 01:09 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
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I've never been to Canada before, but the city I'm most interested in visiting is Montreal.

The thing that strikes me most about Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver though is that every time I watch an HGTV show where couples are trying to find housing, the prices are astronomical. I'm always surprised as to how much like European large cities Canada's large city housing prices are, and how little like American large cities, save NYC or San Francisco. You would think most Canadian families are house poor, that is, paying so much for housing that they practically have no money left over for anything else. I wonder if it's really that tough in Canada or if the tv shows just pick the expensive places to put on.
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