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Old 12-01-2012, 06:27 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Some of the cities within the Denver RTD have "Call and Ride" which takes people from door to door for the price of a regular local ride. I do not know all the details of how this service works, but I do see the Call and Ride buses frequently at the hospital/medical office complex where I work.

RTD
Yeah we have that here but only for the disabled. You have to get approved by a doctor to use the service. Before fare, the average cost per passenger-trip is a whopping $40. Interestingly this service is contracted out to a non-union company, unlike the fixed route service.

However, I know a few people who are disabled and cannot drive, and this service enables them to continue working. I'd bet the net gain of adding a gainfully employed person to the local economy beats out the transportation cost.

In smaller places where there isn't the demand for much fixed-route service, it's open to everyone. Off the top of my head I can think of a few cities in near appalachia here where that is the case. Very helpful for the rural poor.

To the OP's point, Albuquerque's ability to run efficient transit is hampered by the fact that it is not a very dense city, probably one of the least dense in the US. In the link I posted earlier it explained why DRT does not beat scheduled service when scaled out to the size of a large city. So DRT on Central Ave in ABQ might not make sense, but perhaps way out in NE ABQ or on the west side of the river it would.

Think about this: Where will the buses be staged? At one central garage? Say someone calls for the bus 12 miles away. Well, the bus has to drive all the way out there and pick up the passenger. On local streets that could take 25 minutes. And then say the bus gets a call to pick someone up sort of on the way - perhaps a slight deviation of 2 miles. Then the first passenger is inconvenienced and given the wait for the bus and the pickup time for the other passenger, it's unlikely that there will be any time or cost advantage over scheduled service.

I think the best use for DRT would be within jitney service: Share taxi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. It simply cannot replace scheduled service on a meaningful scale, however.
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Old 12-01-2012, 09:01 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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You have some good points. As I said, I don't know all the details for Call and Ride, but I do know it's for everybody, and it's decentralized, by city/locale. For example, if you live in Louisville, you can only use it in Louisville or to go to the mall in Broomfield. You can't use it to go to Denver, or even to Lafayette. I get the idea the cities pay into this somehow to provide it for people.

RTD
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Old 12-01-2012, 09:17 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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From the list, Denver and Boulder aren't there. Perhaps those cities feel the bus is comprehensive enough, and they don't want to pay for service when most can take a regularly scheduled bus?

My dial-a-ride service is only for people with disabilities as well.

ADA Disabled Information - PVTA Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts Transit Authority

Ditto is true with Boston's (MBTA). As well as NYC's MTA and the bus agency for the county I grew up in Long Island. For the MTA, those with a disability that they can walk short distances may get feeder service to a regular bus/train line rather than paratransit the whole way. Some of the paratransit services are contracted taxis.

Last edited by nei; 12-01-2012 at 09:33 AM..
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Old 12-01-2012, 09:56 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
From the list, Denver and Boulder aren't there. Perhaps those cities feel the bus is comprehensive enough, and they don't want to pay for service when most can take a regularly scheduled bus?

My dial-a-ride service is only for people with disabilities as well.

ADA Disabled Information - PVTA Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts Transit Authority

Ditto is true with Boston's (MBTA). As well as NYC's MTA and the bus agency for the county I grew up in Long Island. For the MTA, those with a disability that they can walk short distances may get feeder service to a regular bus/train line rather than paratransit the whole way. Some of the paratransit services are contracted taxis.
Probably. The U of CO also has a bus service for students in Boulder, so perhaps there wouldn't be much market. Don't really know.
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Old 12-01-2012, 02:24 PM
 
642 posts, read 962,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Think about this: Where will the buses be staged? At one central garage? Say someone calls for the bus 12 miles away. Well, the bus has to drive all the way out there and pick up the passenger. On local streets that could take 25 minutes. And then say the bus gets a call to pick someone up sort of on the way - perhaps a slight deviation of 2 miles. Then the first passenger is inconvenienced and given the wait for the bus and the pickup time for the other passenger, it's unlikely that there will be any time or cost advantage over scheduled service.

I think the best use for DRT would be within jitney service: Share taxi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. It simply cannot replace scheduled service on a meaningful scale, however.
I was thinking this could be adapted to some of the existing routes with lower ridership and less frequent pick up times. The busses (or vans or cars) would be strategically placed throughout the route to quickly respond to the next request. If someone along the way requests a ride then yes, it would stop for that person, but since it would be on a fixed route then there would be no deviation and wouldn't significantly affect the travel time for the previous passenger(s).

It was actually the jitney services in Latin America (combis, colectivos)that made me think of something like this because people there can generally get around their cities without cars since rates of car ownership are much lower than in the States.
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Old 12-01-2012, 02:40 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abqpsychlist View Post

It was actually the jitney services in Latin America (combis, colectivos)that made me think of something like this because people there can generally get around their cities without cars since rates of car ownership are much lower than in the States.
Good point.

I know of only one place in the U.S. with private jitneys, and it's where you'd expect (NY)

Dollar van - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-01-2012, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,897,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abqpsychlist View Post
What if bus stops had buttons you push to summon the next bus like you press the button at an elevator? I think something like this could work, especially in cities that aren't very dense and don't have a constant demand to justify fixed routes that carry few passengers.

Has anything like this already been introduced or implemented anywhere?
Personal Rapid Transit (PRT). It's been around since the 1970s.


Morgantown PRT - YouTube


Morgantown Personal Rapid Transit - YouTube


PRT at Morgantown - YouTube
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Old 12-01-2012, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Some of the cities within the Denver RTD have "Call and Ride" which takes people from door to door for the price of a regular local ride. I do not know all the details of how this service works, but I do see the Call and Ride buses frequently at the hospital/medical office complex where I work.

RTD
But that is not really public transit. Its just a publicly funded / subsidized taxi service. Which IMHO is the worst thing RTD has done. It does nothing to improve Denver's air quality or to reduce congestion.
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Old 12-01-2012, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abqpsychlist View Post
There are a ton of ways this could be implemented. For example, on fixed routes with low ridership they could have busses throughout the route on 'standby' waiting for the signal for pick people up. Might not work perfect but could be better than having empty busses running in loops.
So you would have all these bus drivers parked on the side of the road, getting payed $15+ an hour, to just sit there and wait? Doesn't seem very practical or cost efficient to me.
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Old 12-01-2012, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,091 posts, read 16,121,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abqpsychlist View Post
Nah taxis here would run me $50 to get back probably.
And? Just because you're not paying for the bus doesn't mean no one is.

The on-demand pickups are always extremely limited because they're so costly. If the users were paying the fee, then it wouldn't be a problem. Since they're not, there has to be some other means of restricting people from taking advantage of them. Here it's only accessible for those with ADA certificates or who are outside the coverage area of a transit agency.
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