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Old 12-04-2012, 09:37 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Eh, these buses were provided to those in the suburban counties who really didn't have any other buses to choose from. It didn't matter, they just drove. Private bus companies run service to games from parking lots, too.
The MTA adds extra commuter rail for games and events. Not sure if subway frequency is increased.

MTA LIRR - Barclays Center

In a way, the extra trains are subsidizing the stadium, though yes, all transit is subisdized.

Quote:
RTD is a pretty comprehensive system. It's also more expensive than ours and has a better farebox recovery rate. The state views our system as charity only, for the most part.
Yet it's ridership is no higher, maybe a bit lower than Baltimore's.

RTD weekday ridership:

Rail: 63,000
Bus: 212,000

Maryland Transit weekday:

Rail (all types): 109,000
Bus: 250,000

Maryland Transit is statewide but it looks like the bulk of the ridership is in and around Baltimore. DC's suburbs are covered by local agency or the WMATA and other parts of the state look like they have their local bus service. The Baltimore metro has a similar population to the Denver metro as well. From playing around with google maps, the RTD looks like it covers everywhere rather well. Perhaps Baltimore's transit is highly concentrated in a few areas with gaps elsewhere?
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Old 12-04-2012, 11:56 AM
 
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Interestingly, in the early days of L.A. train transit, it was the Red Car that lobbied Los Angeles' jitney service out of business.

LA's war against jitneys - LA Observed
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Old 12-04-2012, 02:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abqpsychlist View Post
What if bus stops had buttons you push to summon the next bus like you press the button at an elevator? I think something like this could work, especially in cities that aren't very dense and don't have a constant demand to justify fixed routes that carry few passengers.

Has anything like this already been introduced or implemented anywhere?
In cities that aren't very dense what is the point of public transportation at all?
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Old 12-05-2012, 02:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunjee View Post
Interestingly, in the early days of L.A. train transit, it was the Red Car that lobbied Los Angeles' jitney service out of business.

LA's war against jitneys - LA Observed
Wait, so the streetcars had it coming then?
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Old 12-05-2012, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
instant on-demand transit?
I think they already have something like that. its called a taxi.
Precisely.
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Old 12-05-2012, 04:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFi View Post
In cities that aren't very dense what is the point of public transportation at all?
That's a question that could be applied to anything public. In some areas, the public schools are so bad that most people opt for private schools, and the only ones who go to the public ones are those who can't afford the alternatives. Since these schools are underperforming, what's the point in spending all this money on them?

The same thing goes for public transportation. There are bus routes used mainly by those who absolutely have no viable alternative. For most people, it's not worth the extra time needed to commute by bus, and therefore choose their private vehicle. Since these 'coverage-oriented' routes serve such a small minority, is it worth spending any money on them at all?

Some people argue that the less popular routes should be scrapped and more attention should be placed on those that already have reasonable usage. Reallocating those resources to the popular lines would increase frequency and improve service. I think, though, that if we adapted a different model for less popular/less dense routes to make them more accessible and dependable, it would create more demand for the busier routes which could, in turn, increase their frequency as well.
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Old 12-05-2012, 06:28 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post

Maryland Transit is statewide but it looks like the bulk of the ridership is in and around Baltimore. DC's suburbs are covered by local agency or the WMATA and other parts of the state look like they have their local bus service. The Baltimore metro has a similar population to the Denver metro as well. From playing around with google maps, the RTD looks like it covers everywhere rather well. Perhaps Baltimore's transit is highly concentrated in a few areas with gaps elsewhere?
Yes MTA is a state agency but really only serves Baltimore with regular transit (it also operates commuter rail). Baltimore's transit is heavily concentrated with gaps elsewhere, correct. It's seen primarily as a charity service by those who operate it. Their attempts to move into the 21st century (tracking, alerts, MORE THAN 4 ROUTES THAT SKIP STOPS, placing stops more than 2 inches apart, etc) have been laughable. Great new buses running the same ancient routes, many adorned with the same route numbers as their 50-years-dead streetcar ancestors.


The average income of an RTD rider is probably $30,000 more than in Baltimore.
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