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Old 12-08-2012, 10:20 AM
 
Location: The City
19,370 posts, read 16,823,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
What the cities need to do, above all else, is improve their schools if they want to attract families with children. This may not be a problem in Canada, but it's a huge problem here in the US.

Just curious, what is done to make condos more kid-friendly?

Your bolded is true, plus crime outside of that there are many aspects of cities that can add to a childhood, also aspects of the burbs that can as well. i split time between an urban and suburban setting growing up. Both have their pluses and minuses but inner city schools can stand to improve greatly and this woul make the cities more attractive to families.

In Philadelphia the difference of a few blocks makes a huge difference at times. In Queen Village families specifically locate within the Meridth elementary school encatchment to have their kids go to one of the best elemetary schools, just across the street the family draw can drop dramatically due to th school effect.

In fact real estate agents market properties in this area as a huge selling to prospective families with schol age children

Best Places to Raise Kids: Great Philadelphia Schools | Philadelphia Magazine Articles
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Old 12-08-2012, 10:42 AM
Status: "Snow is coming for Christmas!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,177 posts, read 60,983,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
Katiana, I think your point about outsiders is well taken. Given the demographics of Greenwich Village and the New York suburbs around 1960, the outside kids were likely to be from more affluent families, not poorer ones. I believe both groups would have been heavily White, maybe a few Black kids living in the Village.
It's not just racial, it's "Oh those kids from *** are all bad" type thinking. I doubt the kids from the burbs were any more of "troublemakers" than the locals. That's how it usually works, IME.
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Old 12-08-2012, 10:53 AM
Status: "Snow is coming for Christmas!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,177 posts, read 60,983,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Your bolded is true, plus crime outside of that there are many aspects of cities that can add to a childhood, also aspects of the burbs that can as well. i split time between an urban and suburban setting growing up. Both have their pluses and minuses but inner city schools can stand to improve greatly and this woul make the cities more attractive to families.

In Philadelphia the difference of a few blocks makes a huge difference at times. In Queen Village families specifically locate within the Meridth elementary school encatchment to have their kids go to one of the best elemetary schools, just across the street the family draw can drop dramatically due to th school effect.

In fact real estate agents market properties in this area as a huge selling to prospective families with schol age children

Best Places to Raise Kids: Great Philadelphia Schools | Philadelphia Magazine Articles
I think it behooves the urban school districts to work to improve ALL the schools, to keep situations like this from getting out of hand.
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Old 12-08-2012, 11:06 AM
 
10,166 posts, read 15,008,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It's not just racial, it's "Oh those kids from *** are all bad" type thinking. I doubt the kids from the burbs were any more of "troublemakers" than the locals. That's how it usually works, IME.
I can sort of see both sides. While on the one hand I think it's true that there has long been a history of blaming "outsiders" (of whatever type) for problems, on the other hand, sometimes the complainers have a point. I don't know about GV specifically, so can't comment on their historical problems. But in some places, especially when an area becomes a destination known for its nightlife, it does attract a lot of rowdy, loud people from other places. It unfortunately seems to be human nature (for some people, anyway) that people are more prone to poor behavior when not on their home turf. The kids who grow up in a neighborhood know that their parents, family friends, nosy neighbors, etc., all know who they are and where they live -- and worse, how to contact their parents to let them know that junior was misbehaving. That provides some additional incentives to tone it down and not do anything too embarrassing, at least not while in their own neighborhood.
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Old 12-08-2012, 11:10 AM
 
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Originally Posted by semiurbanite View Post
Do you feel like your suburbs have more children than your cities, or is it the other way around? From what I can see here in Boston it depends how you measure it. As a percentage of total population, our urban areas here in Boston have a slightly lower percentage of children. However - I decided to calculate the children per square mile for some urban and suburban areas, and it tells a very different story. Once you consider the density, the number of children 14 and under per square mile is far higher in the more urban areas.

So, while some may have this dreamy idea that all the kids are playing in the yards of suburbia, the number of kids living close to you in the more urban areas is far higher. Which explains why the playgrounds are more vibrant, and why its so much easier to walk to more of your friends houses without being chauffeured by parents.

Anyways, just sharing the findings because even I was surprised by how drastically different the numbers are.


City Children per sq mile Type of Area
Lexington 405 Suburban
Newton 816 Suburban
Arlington 1220 Dense Suburban
Cambridge 1780 Semi-Urban
Boston 2031 Urban
Somerville 2359 Semi-Urban
I think ultimately it comes down to neighborhood. My current neighborhood (within city limits) has far more children than do some of the suburban neighborhoods around here. There's a huge range in terms of children (even if looking at per capita and not per square mile) within the suburbs, as well as within city limits. That's been true of other cities we've lived in, too. But if your point is that some city neighborhoods are overflowing with kids, then yes, I agree. (just as some suburban neighborhoods don't have many kids, in part because of aging demographics.)
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Canada
3,679 posts, read 3,603,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Just curious, what is done to make condos more kid-friendly?
Usually through the amenities. I've seen buildings with private playgrounds, either on the roof or in a common courtyard, where all the building's kids can come and play, like a big communal backyard. Some buildings also have large daycare centres, and including a lot of greenspace in an urban area at the municipal level encourages people with kids to consider the area.

Agreed about the school issue, it's the biggest problem for cities in the USA. Personally, I think the unequal funding model for public schools that lead to this situation is the awful, awful gift that keeps on giving in the realms of poverty, crime, and sprawl. It entrenches class. Wealthy people who move to the cities will, I suppose, put their kids in private school, but you're right that they're a huge limiting factor for millions of Americans.
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
28,730 posts, read 15,017,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Usually through the amenities. I've seen buildings with private playgrounds, either on the roof or in a common courtyard, where all the building's kids can come and play, like a big communal backyard. Some buildings also have large daycare centres, and including a lot of greenspace in an urban area at the municipal level encourages people with kids to consider the area.
Requoting from a previous post, wasn't sure if any saw it on that thread...

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
This American mother living for a years in Copenhagen found courtyards in a big plus:

The Courtyards of Copenhagen | Sightline Daily

But I discovered that Copenhagen, though far denser than Seattle, is also dramatically more friendly to children. Like much urban housing in the City of Cyclists, our apartment overlooked a green and spacious courtyard. Gated where it met the sidewalk and shared only with others in our building and adjacent buildings on our block, it had play equipment, benches, chairs, and barbeques set amid gardens, lawns, and full-grown trees.

some American courtyard examples:

Montgomery Park | Community Greens

Still won't be as much nature as a suburb, though suburbs with small lots don't really have much nature anyway. Parents would have to make an extra effort to get out if the want the kids to experience nature.
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Old 12-08-2012, 01:26 PM
 
6,495 posts, read 5,435,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I think it behooves the urban school districts to work to improve ALL the schools, to keep situations like this from getting out of hand.
Often enough, when you work to improve all of the schools, none of them end up improved.
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Old 12-08-2012, 01:27 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 744,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Requoting from a previous post, wasn't sure if any saw it on that thread...
My family stayed in a building like that in Stockholm and it was very nice for our then young daughter.
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Old 12-08-2012, 01:35 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
1,991 posts, read 2,339,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retroit View Post
I never though about it, nor do I think it matters. What matters is quality of life for the children. The suburbs win hands-down.
More like the suburbs win for SOME and the urban wins for others. In South Carolina I prefer the burbs to the urban but when I lived in Atlanta I concluded its urban beats its suburban, and likewise for Nashville's modern urban environment. To me in cities where gentrification has been well underway the city beats the burbs, and it's only where the city is just starting to see the influx shift or hasn't seen it yet that the burbs wins hands down.
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