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Old 12-13-2012, 12:53 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
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I agree with the article. I think green/planted street medians and/or green buffers between sidewalks and streets really enhance the visual appeal of a location.
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Old 12-13-2012, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
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1.61803398875 is considered the most pleasing ratio, also known as the golden ratio
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Old 12-13-2012, 01:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
1.61803398875 is considered the most pleasing ratio, also known as the golden ratio
While I agree with the article, I'm sure I wouldn't go as far as to apply a precise ratio to a species whose brain does not do precision. I'm of the belief that each individual will have a preference for any given space at any given moment and that preference will be vague/imprecise and unique to that individual for that time and place.
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Old 12-14-2012, 03:37 PM
 
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ideal urban design!:


from: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-MbPvhP5PTm...n+Street+2.jpg
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dweebo2220 View Post
I think the width of the street would invite too much and too fast of traffic, thereby discouraging pedestrians. Otherwise, yes.
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
I think the width of the street would invite too much and too fast of traffic, thereby discouraging pedestrians. Otherwise, yes.
Lol. I think that's Disneyland.
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
Lol. I think that's Disneyland.
I noticed that it was Disney. The Mickey balloons might have been the giveaway. But I was referring to it as if it was a real street.
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Old 12-14-2012, 07:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
I noticed that it was Disney. The Mickey balloons might have been the giveaway. But I was referring to it as if it was a real street.
Gotcha.

In an urban design sense, the street is not wide enough I'd say. No room for parking spaces, any kind of divider, and certainly no room for a bike lane.

The sidewalks are wide enough, but any kind of outdoor seating would make walkability difficult.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post

The sidewalks are wide enough, but any kind of outdoor seating would make walkability difficult.
This is the second widest street in Dubrovnik's walled city.
Dubrovnik, Croatia - Google Maps
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Old 12-14-2012, 10:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by memph View Post
This is the second widest street in Dubrovnik's walled city.
Dubrovnik, Croatia - Google Maps
It's beautiful for sure. I'm not sure that kind of development is realistic in the US. Because new development and New Urbanism is usually confined to places where people need autos.

Here's one with a good ratio, matching facade, setback, building height, with ample parking and use of one way streets to save space...

Google Image Result for http://www.realestatecharlestonarea.com/xSites/Agents/AgentOwnedRealtyCo4/Content/UploadedFiles/cityCharlestonSC_KingSt.jpg
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