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Old 12-14-2012, 12:41 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Im not clear - are there no spots at Dublin station, or were they all taken by earlier parkers?


Where transit authorities provide parking, having all spots full seems to me to imply the parking prices are too low. We have situations like that WMATA (DC metrorail) stations, and its caused by a policy of fixed parking rates around the system, I think.
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Old 12-14-2012, 12:42 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
I get this. It's the reality of transit in the Bay area. But am I the only one who thinks, in abstract terms at least, that it's odd to complain about transit not being car-friendly enough?

its all about intermodalism - transit isnt necessarily always for an auto free commute (though it can be)
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Old 12-14-2012, 02:20 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
I get this. It's the reality of transit in the Bay area. But am I the only one who thinks, in abstract terms at least, that it's odd to complain about transit not being car-friendly enough?
Skimming google maps, it seems like the design of those stations was under the assumption that the station was meant to be driven to.
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Old 12-14-2012, 02:33 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Sounds like a parking garage is in order.
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Old 12-14-2012, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Skimming google maps, it seems like the design of those stations was under the assumption that the station was meant to be driven to.
I've read a few articles that talk about how BART is forever defined by its construction in the 70s. Very car oriented and only acts as intra-city transit for a short while in Oakland, Berkeley and San Francisco. Still pretty helpful for commuting and the occasional trip into the city or from city to city, but not something I'd love to regularly rely on.

For example, the Berkeley subway stations were not part of the original plan - the line was actually supposed to follow the highway closer to the Bay along the right of way and be more like the park and ride station seen elsewhere in the East Bay. Berkeley ponied up the money for the subway stops that are closer to Cal.
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
Im not clear - are there no spots at Dublin station, or were they all taken by earlier parkers?


Where transit authorities provide parking, having all spots full seems to me to imply the parking prices are too low. We have situations like that WMATA (DC metrorail) stations, and its caused by a policy of fixed parking rates around the system, I think.
Lots of parking - a fairly large parking lot and at least one multi-level parking structure. Still not enough apparently.
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Old 12-14-2012, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
I get this. It's the reality of transit in the Bay area. But am I the only one who thinks, in abstract terms at least, that it's odd to complain about transit not being car-friendly enough?
I'm sure you're not. Most transit proponents seem to view transit and cars as inherently adversarial as do many car proponents. In a case of something like BART which is predominantly a commuter service, that's really not that true. I mean, if you live in a lala land with the assumption one would live in the East Bay since it's mostly not transit friendly because cars don't exist... maybe.

For people that view public transits as a means of providing transportation rather than some ideological lifestyle agenda, I'd say you're one of a few. The majority of BART stations in the East Bay are really only accessible by driving unless you're withing walking distance which is rare given the spacing.
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Old 12-14-2012, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
I'm a proponent of carpooling but I'm interested to know how you arrived at this conclusion.
Follow the BTUs. My car gets 112 pmpg or 1070 BTU/ppm. BART uses 2400, although you can get that lower by only considering a 1 hour window of time and by restricting the area to the busiest portions. Might make sense if you live there, but I can tell you BART is never full at Concord or Pleasanton. And BART's probably, all things considered, the most environmentally friendly option there is. NYC might be a bit more energy efficient, but then they also burn a lot of coal whereas only 18% of our energy comes from coal. Natural gas accounts for about 50% of our (BART's) power.

But as I said, BART's particularly good. Most systems, Chicago, LA, Boston, Phily, DC, are all no more energy efficient than the average car or worse.
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Old 12-14-2012, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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It is really the "last mile" so to speak that makes transit difficult in many places. You can get to transit, but not the final destination of your home or office.


I am on my phone, please forgive the typos.
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:38 AM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,759,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Follow the BTUs. My car gets 112 pmpg or 1070 BTU/ppm. BART uses 2400, although you can get that lower by only considering a 1 hour window of time and by restricting the area to the busiest portions. Might make sense if you live there, but I can tell you BART is never full at Concord or Pleasanton. And BART's probably, all things considered, the most environmentally friendly option there is. NYC might be a bit more energy efficient, but then they also burn a lot of coal whereas only 18% of our energy comes from coal. Natural gas accounts for about 50% of our (BART's) power.

But as I said, BART's particularly good. Most systems, Chicago, LA, Boston, Phily, DC, are all no more energy efficient than the average car or worse.
But the BART trains are going to be consuming whatever energy they're consuming regardless of whether you use it or not, so you could argue that you're not increasing the energy consumption of BART at all. This is mostly true for carpooling too, although whoever you're carpooling with might have to make a small extra detour to pick you up/drop you off that they otherwise wouldn't have made.
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