U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-16-2012, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,453 times
Reputation: 199

Advertisements

I was reading a thread on here when I came across a post that mentioned Nebraska is 70 percent urban. That caused me to look up my state as well and others, sure enough my state is at 70 percent as well.

First of all I don't think of my state as a heavily urban state, suburban towns don't really scream urban to me in Michigan. Around the Detroit area you can see what is/was or could be, but it's just different.

When I think of urban living, Chicago, NYC, Philly and other cities come to mind as a real urban experience. Technically, the small town near me can be called urban, but it just isn't in reality. It is just a small homely town. Which there are a lot of in this country.

So, what is urban?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-16-2012, 11:19 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,032,489 times
Reputation: 3599
This subject has been beaten to death on these boards...but it's sure to be a never ending debate.

Also, that could be percent of population that lives in an urban area. That definition is more broad and generally just means a highly developed area. Usually measured by census tracts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2012, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,760,961 times
Reputation: 1616
Well there's basically two definitions of urban. One involves dividing the country into two areas, rural and urban areas, with urban areas including cities their suburbs and I think often smaller towns (urban clusters), urban in this case more or less means the "built up area"... even though some of the least dense suburbs aren't very built up.

The other definition involves separating urban areas into suburban and urban.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-17-2012, 06:21 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
The census definition uses urban to mean "not rural". They don't distinguish between urban and suburban. Urban according to the census requires a population cluster of at least 50,000 people, in contiguous census tracts of 1,000 people per square mile. If a census tract is surrounded with census tracts of that density or above on all sides it is counted as urban even if its density is lower. This is to count preserved city/suburban parkland, industrial land with low population as urban.

An urban cluster is the same but with 2500-50,000 people may get counted as small city. Usually lumped in with rural, but historically was counted as urban.

2010 Urban and Rural Classification Main Page - Geography - US Census Bureau
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2012, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,453 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The census definition uses urban to mean "not rural". They don't distinguish between urban and suburban. Urban according to the census requires a population cluster of at least 50,000 people, in contiguous census tracts of 1,000 people per square mile. If a census tract is surrounded with census tracts of that density or above on all sides it is counted as urban even if its density is lower. This is to count preserved city/suburban parkland, industrial land with low population as urban.

An urban cluster is the same but with 2500-50,000 people may get counted as small city. Usually lumped in with rural, but historically was counted as urban.

2010 Urban and Rural Classification Main Page - Geography - US Census Bureau
Ah, so I see urban in this case is basically just developed. Very loose meaning then, I've always thought of urban as like the main city in a state or something along those lines.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top